front line security group, LLC

13275 park street
apartment 3
alden, new york 14004

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
FEBRUARY 21, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4363732

County
ERIE

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
GREGORY S. KELLOGG, JR.
13275 PARK STREET
APARTMENT 3
ALDEN, NEW YORK, 14004

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - FRONT LINE SECURITY GROUP, LLC









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • TSA Security Lines: Changes Coming at the Airport
    Wednesday May 24, 2017

    Soon travelers will have to pull out more than just laptops from carry-on bags at airport security lines. Food and books may also end up in separate bins, per a TSA experiment. WSJ's Tanya Rivero and Middle Seat columnist Scott McCartney explain the changes ahead.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Travel
  • First Alleged iPhone 8 Part Leaks Surface
    By Juli Clover - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    Our first glimpse at components that could be destined for the much-rumored 5.8-inch "iPhone 8" and its 4.7 and 5.5-inch companion devices surfaced this morning in a post on reddit. The images are said to be sourced from a case manufacturer who received them from a glass supplier in China.

    The first photo depicts what is said to be the front and back panel of the iPhone 8, with the front panel featuring a super thin bezel around all sides along with a top bar that could perhaps house a front-facing camera, microphone, and speaker. There's been some question on how Apple will handle the front-facing camera and mockup devices and renderings haven't offered a clear picture.


    Some design renderings have shown a section at the top of the device similar to the front panel in this image, while others seem to feature a bar that extends fully across the top of the device.

    The rear panel features a vertical dual-lens camera and a separate protruding lens component, with no rear Touch ID in sight, in line with rumors suggesting Apple has indeed figured out how to build Touch ID into the display of the device.

    A second photo depicts the two alleged iPhone 8 components next to alleged components for the 4.7-inch iPhone 7s and the 5.5-inch iPhone 7s Plus, two devices that are rumored to be launching alongside the OLED iPhone 8. All three rear shells are said to be made from glass in order to support wireless charging, and that all three devices will get wireless charging is a rumor we've heard before from KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.


    While these images are in line with many rumors that we're heard about Apple's upcoming devices, there's no way to verify their authenticity. They could very well be from a clone device or a dummy device created based on the iPhone 8 design leaks and rumors that have circulated.

    Even if fake, these panels are based on supply chain information and rumors and do perhaps provide an idea of what actual iPhone 8 components might look like. Still, it's best to view these leaks with some skepticism until we begin to see more part leaks to corroborate the design.

    Related Roundup: iPhone 8

    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Debt Collector Accused Of Taking Money From People Who Didn’t Owe Anything
    By Ashlee Kieler - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    As part of its ongoing efforts to crack down on unscrupulous debt collectors, the Federal Trade Commission has accused a North Carolina company of running a “phantom” debt collection scheme that went after people for money that they did not actually owe. The FTC announced today that it had filed a complaint accusing ACDI Group LLC and Solutions to Portfolios …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • iMac Pro May Feature Intel's Server-Grade 'Purley' Processors, ARM Coprocessor
    By Joe Rossignol - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Apple earlier this month unveiled the iMac Pro, a workstation-class desktop computer with up to an 18-core Intel Xeon processor, top-of-the-line Radeon Pro Vega graphics, up to 4TB of SSD storage, and up to 128GB of ECC RAM.


    Apple didn't specify exactly which processors will be included in the iMac Pro, but if the blog Pike's Universum is to be believed, it could be powered by Intel's next-generation server-grade Skylake-EX and Skylake-EP processors, which are based on a platform codenamed "Purley."

    The blog, which appears to be sourcing its information from firmware files in the macOS High Sierra developer beta, said the iMac Pro will use Intel's new server-class LGA3647 socket, not its high-end, desktop-class LGA2066 socket.

    If the information is accurate, it suggests the iMac Pro could have truly server-grade Xeon processors, rather than using Intel's recently announced Core-X series of Skylake and Kaby Lake chips that still use the LGA2066 socket.

    The blog added that the new iMac Pro appears to be coming with a Secure Enclave, suggesting it will have an ARM coprocessor like the MacBook Pro with Touch Bar for added security. It would also open the door to Touch ID on the iMac Pro, but Apple made no mention of the feature when introducing the computer.


    Pike's Universum revealed some of the iMac Pro's tech specs in April, two months prior to it being announced, including that it would have Xeon processors, ECC RAM, faster SSD storage, AMD graphics options, and Thunderbolt 3 ports, but some of the specific details proved to be inaccurate.

    Apple said the iMac Pro will be available to order in December, starting at $4,999 in the United States.

    Related Roundup: iMac Pro
    Tag: Intel

    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • 5 Things Fundraisers Should Report On After A Donor Visit
    By Sophie Penney - Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    You’ve heard it from a multitude of sources: fundraising success depends on contact with donors. Picking up the phone, scheduling the appointment, then having a meaningful visit all matter. But what about after the contact has been made? What information did we learn that matters with regard to moving the […]

    Author information

    Sophie Penney, Ph.D is President of i5 Fundraising and the Senior Program Coordinator/Lecturer for the Certificate Program in Fundraising Leadership at Penn State University. She has nearly 20 years of experience as a front-line fundraiser, regularly facilitates workshops and has authored numerous articles published in Advancing Philanthropy.

    Source: Bloomerang
  • Supply Chain Evidence Mounts for Advanced 3D Sensing Abilities Coming to iPhone 8
    By Mitchel Broussard - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    Ahead of the iPhone 8's predicted September announcement date, supply chain reports over the past few days have indicated a ramp up of 3D sensing components that are predicted to be destined for augmented reality and biometric security applications in 2017's high-end iPhone 8. In a research note by BlueFin Research Partners, "winners" for iPhone 8 component production are said to include Finisar and Lumentum for 3D sensing modules and Broadcom for wireless charging components (via Barron's).

    Reports began building last week when iPhone camera component supplier Largan Precision confirmed that it will ship lenses for 3D sensing modules in the second half of 2017, while refraining from directly mentioning Apple and iPhone 8. In a recent quarterly earnings report, supplier Finisar made remarks that heavily suggested it will be "one of two or three suppliers" of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) in the iPhone 8, according to LoupVentures.

    iPhone 8 rendering by Benjamin Geskin

    Such technology could be implemented into the iPhone 8's rumored 3D sensing module and help "enrich the augmented reality experience" in the next-generation iPhone. Apple and CEO Tim Cook earlier this month detailed plans to back AR and its potential as an indispensable future technology with the reveal of ARKit, a developer platform that will provide the building blocks for consumer AR iPhone apps.

    Likewise, Lumentum has announced that it expects to see volume shipments for its VCSEL lasers begin in the second half of 2017, timed with the annual production ramp up of iPhone manufacturing.
    On last nights earnings call, Finisar management did not mention Apple by name, but they highlighted they expect to see volume VCSEL orders in their second fiscal quarter, which is the October quarter end of this calendar year. The company anticipates shipping “millions” of units during the quarter, but management also went on to say they anticipate unit shipments to be in the “10s of millions” in future quarters, which gives us further confidence 3D sensing and AR applications will be one of the focus features in the next generation of iPhones. In May of this year, Lumentum was the first VCSEL supplier to announce they anticipate volume shipments to begin in the second half of 2017.

    We also want to highlight Finisar acknowledged they are shipping VCSEL lasers to multiple customers, but one customer (aka Apple) is accounting for the majority of total demand. We believe Finisar and others supplying VCSEL lasers are supply constraint and shipping everything they can manufacture. We believe Apple has secured a high percentage of all VCSEL lasers created, which we view as a large competitive advantage and will make Apple a leading AR player in the smartphone space.
    LoupVentures further suggested that the significantly updated iPhone 8 will have a front-facing, low-end VCSEL laser and a rear-facing, high-end VCSEL laser, meaning that AR applications could take advantage of either camera. A long-running rumor for the iPhone 8 has been a dual-lens rear camera that could provide increased separation between the two lenses and allow for a greater difference in perspective, helping fuel better AR experiences. A front-facing dual-lens camera has been suggested as a possibility in the new iPhone as well.

    In estimating the iPhone 8's cost, the site believes that Apple will add around $100 onto the cost of the smartphone specifically due to incorporating 3D sensing modules. That price comes to around $950 (with no storage tier size references), and largely falling into line with the new iPhone's predicted "premium" status.

    For its part, Broadcom is said to have a predominant place in the supply chain for wireless charging components of the iPhone 8, a feature fellow supplier Wistron recently confirmed will be coming to at least one of 2017's iPhone models. iPhone 8's wireless charging is expected to be fueled by inductive technology, because long-range wireless charging for an iPhone is still expected to be years away from feasibility.

    In total, reports surrounding iPhone 8 component manufacturing have been increasing recently, with Apple said to be dominating the NAND memory chip supply chain and increasing shortages for an already strained section of component supplies.

    Related Roundup: iPhone 8
    Tags: ARKit, augmented reality

    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Facing limits of remote hacking, Army cybers up the battlefield
    By Sean Gallagher - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Army prepares for a less friendly electronic battlespace, embeds cyber in units.

    Source: Ars Technica
  • Teardown of New 4K 21.5-inch iMac Reveals Removable RAM and Modular CPU
    By Tim Hardwick - Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    iFixit has published a teardown of the new 4K 21.5-inch iMac, which reveals that – surprisingly – Apple's smallest all-in-one desktop machine has both removable RAM and a Kaby Lake processor that's not soldered onto the logic board.

    iFixit made the discovery by disassembling Apple's $1,299 mid-range 3.0GHz stock option, which includes 8GB of 2400MHz DDR4 memory, a Radeon Pro 555 graphics card with 2GB of VRAM, and a 1TB 5400-RPM hard drive.


    After slicing through the adhesive that secures the 4K display to the iMac's housing and removing the power supply, hard drive, and fan, iFixit discovered that the memory modules aren't soldered onto the logic board like previous models, but instead sit in two removable SO-DIMM slots.

    Similarly, after detaching the heatsink and removing the warranty voiding stickers on the backside of the logic board, iFixit found that the Intel SR32W Core i5-7400 Kaby Lake processor sits in a standard LGA 1151 CPU socket, making it possible to replace or upgrade the CPU without a reflow station.

    As iFixit notes, an upgradeable iMac is a big shift in direction from Apple. The last 21.5-inch iMac with expandable memory was the 2013 model, while the last to include a modular CPU came in 2012. iFixit speculates that the change to a socketed processor may be because Intel's desktop class Kaby Lake line-up currently lacks any permanently mountable chips, but it's conceivable Apple could have requested one if it so chose.


    It's important to note that Apple officially considers these parts non-user-replaceable, which is easy to see given the relative difficulty accessing them – compare the work involved in accessing the 21.5-inch iMac's RAM slots, with the external memory hatch found in the 27-inch iMacs, for example. That said, the fact that replacing these components is practically possible will come as music to the ears of tinkerers armed with the right tools and instructions.

    Despite the upgradeable RAM and CPU, iFixit awarded the 2017 21.5-inch iMac a 3 out of 10 for repairability (10 being easiest to repair) because of the challenge involved in accessing the components. Still, that's an improvement on the 2015 model, which was given a 1 out of 10 for repairability.

    Other minor changes of note discovered in the teardown include a single microphone below the iMac's LG-manufactured display (where previously there were dual mics), a replaceable CMOS battery, and an upgradeable 3.5-inch SATA hard drive, but no SSD connector.

    Check out the full teardown on the iFixit website.

    Tag: iFixit

    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors