foundation information services & technology ltd.

1355 east 18th st 1 d
brooklyn, new york 11230

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 29, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4437421

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - FOUNDATION INFORMATION SERVICES & TECHNOLOGY LTD.









Buffer



submit to reddit

Telephone
n/a

Fax
n/a

Website
n/a

Email address
n/a

LinkedIn
n/a

Facebook
n/a

Google+
n/a

Twitter
n/a

Pinterest
n/a

Instagram
n/a



  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Everyone Is Sharing Passwords And Streaming Services Know It
    By Ashlee Kieler - Wednesday Jul 12, 2017

    They say sharing is caring, and that’s apparently continues to be true when it comes to login information for streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, HBO Now, and other services. In fact, a new report suggests that more than one-fifth of young adults borrow passwords to watch their favorite shows on the services. A new poll from Reuters and Ipsos found …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Lenovo Reaches Tentative Settlement Over Superfish PC Adware
    Tuesday Sep 5, 2017

    Lenovo Group Ltd. has reached a tentative $3.5 million settlement to resolve accusations that it had installed on some consumer laptops a type of ad-injecting software that could give criminals a way to steal consumers’ personal information.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Technology: What's News
  • Bezos Family Foundation Awards $25 Million to NYU Langone – Brooklyn
    By webmaster@philanthropynewsdigest.org (Kyoko Uchida) - Monday Jul 24, 2017

    Source: Philanthropy News Digest (PND)
  • China clamps down on holes in ‘Great Firewall’
    By Joe McDonald - Friday Jul 21, 2017

    BEIJING — As part of a crackdown on Web surfers who evade censorship, China is tightening control over foreign companies’ Internet use — a move that some worry might disrupt their operations or jeopardize trade secrets.In a letter to corporate customers, the biggest Chinese Internet service provider says virtual private networks, which create encrypted links between computers and can be used to see sites blocked by Beijing’s Web filters, will be permitted only to connect to a company’s headquarters abroad.The letter from state-owned China Telecom Ltd. says VPN users are barred from linking to other sites outside China, a change that might block access to news, social media or business services that are obscured by its “Great Firewall.”Authorities have tried to reassure companies they won’t be affected, but if the rules in the China Telecom letter are enforced, they could hamper activity ranging from gathering information for business deals to employees working on business trips.The crackdown reflects President Xi Jinping’s vision of “Internet sovereignty,” or Beijing’s absolute right to control what people can do and see online.Control over information is especially sensitive ahead of a party congress late this year at which Xi is due to be appointed to a second five-year term as leader.Beijing has repeatedly pressured foreign companies to hand over technology, encryption know-how and other trade secrets in exchange for access to its huge and growing market.In a survey by the American Chamber of Commerce in China last year, 79 percent of companies that responded said Web filters hurt them by blocking access to information and business tools.President Trump said in April he would temporarily set aside disputes with Beijing over market barriers and currency while the two sides cooperated over North Korea’s nuclear program.A Western diplomat who asked not to be identified further due to the sensitivity of the issue said companies have told his government they worry the controls might lead to weaker data security and trade secrets being leaked to Chinese competitors.China Telecom and the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, which announced the January crackdown, did not respond to requests for information about the letter.[...] companies increasingly limit VPN access to employees such as media managers “with a critical business need” to see a banned website, according to Jake Parker, vice president of China operations for the U.S.-China Business Council.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Business and Technology News
  • The High Value of Your Nonprofit’s Values
    Wednesday Jan 25, 2017

    I was delighted to participate as a steering committee in the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s inaugural Spark Prize, an exciting new grantmaking initiative. I was truly impressed with how the Foundation integrated its values into every aspect of this project and leveraged them as a strategic decision-making tool in the grant review process, so I asked their fabulous DIrector of Communications, Liane Stegmaier, to write about it.  - Sarah Durham

    This month, Brooklyn Community Foundation marks the third anniversary of Brooklyn Insights—an extensive Brooklyn-wide community engagement project launched shortly after our President Cecilia Clarke joined the Foundation, which ultimately produced a bold grantmaking strategy that has since garnered national recognition.

    And coincidentally, on this anniversary we are announcing the recipients of our new Spark Prize—one of the Foundation’s highest-profile grantmaking efforts to date, awarding 5 outstanding Brooklyn nonprofits with no-strings-attached grants of $100,000 each in recognition of their service to Brooklyn, commitment to equity and justice, strong organizational values, and dynamic vision for the future.

    While we’re often asked about the major themes surfaced through our 1,000-plus Brooklyn Insights’ community conversations, the core grantmaking strategies we’ve since focused on, or our new institution-wide Racial Justice Lens—in this blog, we’re going to focus on the set of values that emerged during Brooklyn Insights that not only helped the Foundation determine our new direction, but continue to guide us and inform new initiatives like the Spark Prize.

    Of course, we knew three years ago that creating a community-led strategy might also lead us to change our mission statement and vision. But what we didn’t fully appreciate at the time was that while mission and vision are critical for moving us forward, strong institutional values are necessary to define who we are as an institution and how we hold ourselves accountable to these pursuits each and every day.

    Over the six months of listening to Brooklynites tell us about the challenges they faced in their communities, the opportunities they saw for change, and the roles we as their Community Foundation could play, we also heard loud and clear a call for us to be a different kind of institution: one that wears its values on its sleeve, keeps the doors open, and always positions community voices at the fore of its work.

    This call led us to articulate five new values for Brooklyn Community Foundation:

    • Courage. We believe in fearlessly identifying barriers to change and we fight for solutions that help overcome injustice.

    • Creativity. We believe that the power of imagination is greater than the challenges we face. We celebrate what works. We pursue the new. We learn as much from failure as we do from success.

    • Honesty. We are committed to being open and trustworthy in all we do and seek partners who share our values.

    • Collaboration. We believe in creating solutions together, harnessing the diversity of Brooklyn, and partnering with the community to spark change and produce results.

    • Respect. We believe in every resident’s dignity and basic human rights, and honor diversity of race, gender and background.

    We’ve come to refer to these values at every test in our decision-making, we talk about them in our Board meetings, staff meetings, and annual staff reviews, and they’ve informed our ongoing racial justice and equity trainings.

    And with the new Spark Prize, we are spotlighting the importance of strong values, and celebrating 5 Brooklyn nonprofits for their exemplary values-driven work. The first-ever recipients of the Spark Prize are Audre Lorde Project, Common Justice, Make the Road New York, MoCADA, and Neighbors Together.

    A committee of approximately 30 Brooklyn civic, business and philanthropic leaders (including Big Duck’s own Sarah Durham!) selected the 5 organizations from an applicant pool of over 150. They were chosen on the basis of a 1,000 word essay, followed by in person interviews where each spoke to the role their values play in their organization and how they align with the Foundation’s values.

    In their application, Audre Lorde Project stated that their values are rooted in transparency, wellness, transformation, cultural work and coalition building. “Collaboration with other social justice organizations is central to ALP’s intersectional, movement-building work.”

    Make the Road wrote that their values are why their 19,000+ members shape all of their campaigns: “Our youth challenge oppression by naming the disparate treatment of black and brown, LGBTQ and immigrant young people …. Their passionate advocacy has resulted in huge movement victories.”

    MoCADA isa museum founded on principles of justice, equity, and inclusion….courage, creativity and collaboration are the key elements of our mission, vision and values.”

    Neighbors Together’s work isgrounded in our belief in the dignity and potential of each person to be a vital part of creating a more just society” and its members have the courage “to fight for real and lasting solutions to overcome injustice.”

    And last but not least, Common Justice highlighted each of their values in their application—demonstrating a deep connection between their values and the unique nature of their healing work between victims and perpetrators of violence:

    • Accountability. We are responsible for our actions, our words, our power, and our impacts. We know that accountability affirms the dignity and humanity both of those responsible and of those harmed, and we hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold others. 

    • Transparency. We are transparent about our actions, our intentions, our options, and our decisions. We communicate with clarity and consistency with those impacted by what we do. 

    • Transformation. We believe in the potential of all human beings to transform, heal, grow, change, and be resilient. We believe we all deserve individuals, communities, and institutions that support us in being our best selves. 

    • Respect. We believe in the inherent worth, importance, rights, culture, and strengths of all people, and work to reflect and honor that in the way we behave toward others. 

    • Purpose. We uphold the responsibilities and boundaries of our work because we are ambitious, hopeful, and outcomes-driven. 

    These 5 values send a powerful message, and are a primary reason Common Justice is receiving the Spark Prize in our inaugural year.

    As nonprofit communicators, we are all very familiar with the adage “Show, Don’t Tell.”

    Mission tells us what you do; values show who you are.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Google Will Stop Scanning The Contents Of Your Gmail Messages To Sell Ads
    By Ashlee Kieler - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    If you use one of Google’s many services then you’ve probably come to the realization that the tech company has a lot of your personal information and data, which it uses to sell ads. Now, after years of debate on whether or not it’s okay for Google to read users’ private emails, the tech giant says it will stop …

    Source: The Consumerist
foundation information services amp technology ltd brooklyn ny