fischer backflow prevention & plumbing service LLC

attn: member
po box 16391, 14616
rochester, new york 14616

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
DECEMBER 06, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4497500

County
MONROE

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - FISCHER BACKFLOW PREVENTION & PLUMBING SERVICE LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Four Credit Repair Agencies Accused Of Misleading Customers, Charging Illegal Fees
    By Ashlee Kieler - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    Four different “credit repair” operations have been ordered to pay a total of more than $2 million in penalties for allegedly tricking people into thinking their bad credit could be easily fixed.The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced today that it filed complaints and proposed judgments against Prime Credit, LLC, IMC Capital, LLC, Commercial Credit Consultants, and Park View Law, …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Report Reveals In-App Purchase Scams in the App Store
    By Tim Hardwick - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    An investigation into App Store developer pay-outs has uncovered a scamming trend in which apps advertising fake services are making thousands of dollars a month from in-app purchases.

    In a Medium article titled How to Make $80,000 Per Month on the Apple App Store, Johnny Lin describes how he discovered the trend, which works by manipulating search ads to promote dubious apps in the App Store and then preys on unsuspecting users via the in-app purchase mechanism.

    I scrolled down the list in the Productivity category and saw apps from well-known companies like Dropbox, Evernote, and Microsoft. That was to be expected. But what's this? The #10 Top Grossing Productivity app (as of June 7th, 2017) was an app called "Mobile protection :Clean & Security VPN".

    Given the terrible title of this app (inconsistent capitalization, misplaced colon, and grammatically nonsensical "Clean & Security VPN?"), I was sure this was a bug in the rankings algorithm. So I check Sensor Tower for an estimate of the app's revenue, which showed… $80,000 per month?? That couldn't possibly be right. Now I was really curious.
    To learn how this could be, Lin installed and ran the app, and was soon prompted to start a "free trial" for an "anti-virus scanner" (iOS does not need anti-virus software thanks to Apple's sandboxing rules for individual apps). Tapping on the trial offer then threw up a Touch ID authentication prompt containing the text "You will pay $99.99 for a 7-day subscription starting Jun 9, 2017".


    Lin was one touch away from paying $400 a month for a non-existent service offered by a scammer.
    It suddenly made a lot of sense how this app generates $80,000 a month. At $400/month per subscriber, it only needs to scam 200 people to make $80,000/month, or $960,000 a year. Of that amount, Apple takes 30%, or $288,000?—?from just this one app.
    Lin went on to explain how dishonorable developers are able to take advantage of Apple's App Store search ads product because there's no filtering or approval process involved. Not only that, ads look almost indistinguishable from real results in the store, while some ads take up the entire search result's first page.

    Lin dug deeper and found several other similar apps making money off the same scam, suggesting a wider disturbing trend, with scam apps regularly showing up in the App Store's top grossing lists.

    It's unclear at this point how these apps managed to make it onto the App Store in the first place given Apple's usually stringent approval process, or whether changes to the search ads system in iOS 11 will prevent this immoral practice from occurring in future. We'll be sure to update this article if we hear more from Apple.

    In the meantime, users should report scam apps when they see them and inform less savvy friends of this scamming trend until something is done to eradicate it.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Target Goes After Prime Pantry, Launches Giant Box Shipments In Minnesota
    By Laura Northrup - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    Target wants to encourage customers to order more everyday basics online, and to order those items all in one single shipment. That’s why the retailer wants you to fill a box that’s roughly the size of a shopping cart with non-perishable food and household goods, which will be delivered to you the next day for five bucks. Does that sound …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Twitter Urges Court To Reject Bid To Revive Lawsuit Over ISIS Attack
    Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Family members of people killed in an attack in Jordan shouldn't be able to proceed with a lawsuit accusing Twitter of encouraging terrorism, the microblogging service argues.

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    Wednesday Nov 23, 2016

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    On the streaming service Shudder, foreign series like “Jordskott” and “Penance” offer a classic psychological dread that’s in short supply on American TV.

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  • City Leaders Call “Shenanigans” In Battle Between Pot Store & Dubious Arcade
    By Mary Beth Quirk - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    As more states legalize recreational marijuana, regulators face a steep learning curve when it comes to rules on when and where pot retailers can set up shop. For example, it might make sense to restrict marijuana sellers from operating near places where you’ll find lots of kids, but could that same rule be gamed just to prevent a retailer from …

    Source: The Consumerist