first step day care services corp.

107-03 astoria blvd., ste. 1fl
e. elmhurst, new york 11369

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 03, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4646343

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - FIRST STEP DAY CARE SERVICES CORP.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • San Francisco Could Be First City To Ban Sale Of Flavored Liquid Nicotine
    By Ashlee Kieler - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Last fall, the American Academy of Pediatrics called for a ban on flavored tobacco products. Now, one city is poised to do just that: San Francisco took steps this week to become the first city to approve a sales ban on flavored vaping liquids in a bid to prevent young adults from becoming addicted to the products.  The Associated …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • The 'New And Improved' Sustainable Development Goals. Why Should Brands Care?
    Wednesday Oct 7, 2015

    I spent two intense days at the Social Good Summit in New York last week and left feeling both exhausted and exhilarated. The exhaustion was the result of attending six hours of back-to-back sessionswith no break, listening to an impressive mix of leaders from business, government, the entertainment world, NGOs, start-ups and civil society talk about the challenges confronting the world today.These leaders have established 17 ambitious sustainable goals for the world to accomplish-in only 15 short years. The exhilaration came from feeling empowered to think about new ways to tackle some ofthese goals using the powerful marketing tools at our disposal. My first step is to share a few ways that can marketers and brands engage with these goals and a few pointers.

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Green
  • How to Save a Nonprofit: The Care Steps Required in Mergers and Acquisitions
    By Jason Schneiderman - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    This account of the care needed when making a nonprofit acquisition in good faith is a positive but cautionary lesson for those considering these kinds of organization-changing affiliations.

    The post How to Save a Nonprofit: The Care Steps Required in Mergers and Acquisitions appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • Do your supporters support you—or just one thing you do?
    Tuesday May 2, 2017

    Building a strong supporter base is one of the most important tasks for any nonprofit—arguably second only to achieving your mission. Without people to donate, volunteer, or take action, a nonprofit’s ability make a difference is severely limited.

    But exactly how you recruit new supporters can lead to problems down the road. Especially when nonprofits run campaigns around specific issues—or have a set of programs that address different problems but work toward a common goal—supporters can come to identify with the campaign or program they first encountered, rather than with your organization as a whole.

    This is an issue for a couple of reasons: First, any content you send these supporters that doesn’t focus on the work they have a connection to may feel irrelevant. And, as found in a recent study from Abila, a high number of donors say they may stop giving because of irrelevant content. It might feel like a sensible response to segment supporters so they only receive content you know will be of interest. But, few nonprofits have the resources to maintain this kind of communications strategy.  

    Besides, a supporter who cares about your overall mission is likely to have a much higher lifetime value. Here are a few strategies for building holistic relationships with your constituents:

    Build a solid house
    If you read this blog regularly, you probably know that Big Duck has been thinking a lot about brand architecture—a strategy for organizing and expressing the hierarchy of your brand. Too often, nonprofits fall into a habit of developing distinct visual identities or catchy names for their programs or campaigns. While making your initiatives stand out on their own isn’t always a bad thing, having distinct sub-brands makes it much easier for a supporter to identify with a program or campaign in a way that isn’t easily transferrable. This is of particular danger if these sub-brands differ in a significant way from your primary brand. If this sounds like you, it may be time to simplify how your initiatives are presented.

    Take them step by step
    The “ladder of engagement” is a communications framework we commonly use to think through strategies and tactics for getting the attention of someone who isn’t yet aware of your organization, converting them to become a supporter, and deepening their relationship until they are a true advocate for your cause. But this exercise can be helpful in achieving a variety of more specific communications goals, from how to connect the people you serve to a new program to how to identify and cultivate new board members to—you guessed it—how to bridge the gap between support for an initiative to support for your organization. Take a single afternoon to map out what you need to take supporters who don’t know your larger organization, make sure they’re aware of the bigger picture, and deepen their relationship until they’re eager to get out there and help broaden your community. Think through their motivations, what they’re looking for, and how you can reach out to them in ways that appeal to them—and, presto, you’ll have a roadmap for achieving your goal.

    Keep it together
    When you’re in the weeds at a nonprofit every day, it can be easy to forget how content may appear for someone who’s first encountering your organization. It may feel obvious how an initiative relates to your mission, or you may not think to mention your organization’s name because, well, the logo’s at the top-left corner, right? When developing content (even a new program name) it’s ideal to keep in mind how it will be understood to the least informed, most distracted reader. Making a point to always put your organization front and center and clearly explain how the initiative relates back to your mission will help you avoid a highly fragmented audience. For an example of this done well, take a look at the Food Bank For New York City’s financial empowerment services. The name, Food & Finances, tells you immediately that the program relates directly to hunger, and the landing page makes the connection more explicit in the second sentence.

    Get them when they’re paying attention
    Some people just aren’t going to take the time to explore your organization beyond the initiative they’ve engaged with. Sometimes you just have to go where they are and put the bigger picture right in front of them. Always referencing the organization name and connection to your mission is one way to do this, but it can take a bigger effort to get people to absorb your messages. When constituents take an action, they are highly primed to pay closer attention to what you have to say next. If there are events, volunteer opportunities, or advocacy actions associated with specific campaigns or programs, consider using the confirmation page and email to connect them with other initiatives or to your overall mission. Think about creating an online welcome series—a set of emails that are are automatically sent based on the date constituents take an online action. Include content that finds a dynamic way to explain your overall mission and how your various initiatives fit together. Or, if you have the bandwidth, build out a system of welcome series that are specific to the action in order to explicitly address how one program or campaign is in service of a bigger picture.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • AppleCare+ for Mac and iPhone Must Be Bought Within 60 Days of Purchase
    By Juli Clover - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    All of Apple's AppleCare+ plans for Macs, iPads, and iPhones, must be bought alongside a new device or within 60 days of purchase, according to AppleCare+ support staff that MacRumors spoke to this morning.

    Following its Worldwide Developers Conference in June that saw the debut of new iMacs, MacBooks, and MacBook Pro models, Apple introduced an updated AppleCare+ for Mac warranty plan that provides standard AppleCare coverage along with accidental damage coverage.

    Apple's AppleCare+ for Mac plan was introduced on June 5

    The original AppleCare plans for the Mac could be purchased while the Mac was still under its standard warranty, so customers had a year to buy it, but with the new AppleCare+ plan for Mac, a purchase must be made within 60 days.

    Apple in March changed its AppleCare+ policy for the iPhone and iPad and temporarily allowed customers to purchase the plan for up to one year after the device's purchase, while it too was still under standard warranty, but that policy appears to have been reverted back to 60 days.

    In March of 2017, an iPhone 7 Plus purchased in September was temporarily eligible for AppleCare+. That is no longer the case due to policy reversion

    AppleCare+ plans for the iPhone and the iPad must once again be purchased within 60 days of a device purchase. Attempting to make an AppleCare+ purchase on an iOS device purchased more than 60 days ago now brings up no AppleCare+ purchase options when logging into the AppleCare+ website.


    AppleCare+ is no longer available for an iPhone 7 Plus purchased less than a year ago

    As for the Mac, customers who have had their Macs for longer than 60 days but less than a year are not eligible for AppleCare+ but are still able to purchase a standard AppleCare Protection Plan, MacRumors has learned. Apple is only offering AppleCare+ for Mac on its website, so customers will need to call in to Apple Support to make the standard AppleCare purchase. Standard Mac AppleCare is priced at $149 to $349, depending on the machine.


    A MacBook Pro purchased in October 2016 isn't eligible for AppleCare+, but standard AppleCare can still be purchased via Apple Support

    AppleCare+ for Mac is available for the MacBook, 13-inch MacBook Pro, 15-inch MacBook Pro, MacBook Air, iMac, Mac Pro, and Mac mini, with prices ranging from $99 to $379. The plan extends the warranty of the Mac to three years and includes coverage for two incidents of accidental damage, but a service fee of $99 will be charged for screen damage or external damage while a service fee of $299 will be charged for any other damage.

    AppleCare+ for iPhone is available for $129 for the iPhone 6s and later, $99 for the iPhone SE, and $99 for iPad models. It extends warranty coverage to two years and covers two incidents of accidental damage, with a service fee of $29 required for screen repairs or $99 for other damage.

    Purchasing AppleCare+ for Mac, iPhone, or iPad after the device has already been purchased requires customers to run a remote diagnostic to ensure the device is working properly or have it inspected at an Apple retail location.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • What You Need To Know About Senate Bill To Repeal, Replace Obamacare
    By Chris Morran - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    After weeks of secrecy, Senate Republican leaders have finally released a draft version of the budget resolution they intend to use to repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act.The 142-page bill [PDF], now dubbed the Better Care Reconciliation Act, will likely undergo additional changes in the coming days, as GOP leadership attempts to move forward …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Celebrating 10 years of GoogleServe
    Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog
  • Celebrating 10 years of GoogleServe
    Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Source: The Official Google Blog