farmer's table cafe, inc.

17 church street
new paltz, new york 12561

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 30, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4410619

County
ULSTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - FARMER'S TABLE CAFE, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • US Russians wary of Trump-Putin meeting in Germany
    By STEVE PEOPLES, Associated Press - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    BRIGHTON BEACH, N.Y. (AP) — The men sipping coffee in this Brighton Beach cafe have mixed emotions about the world leaders shaking hands on the television above the cash register."Shaking hands with President Putin is like holding a cobra in his hands," said Efes Cafe co-owner, Michael Rubinsteyn, as grainy images from Trump's Friday meeting with Putin flashed on the TV behind him.Storefronts along Brighton Beach Avenue feature signs in Russian, the first language for many residents of this working-class neighborhood.When asked, a handful of Russian immigrants opened up about a meeting they viewed as a positive step in relations between two world powers — even if they don't trust the Russian president.Smart people shake hands and sit at the table and talk, said Boris Milman, 60, who drank coffee as he waited to open his clothing store down the street.Trump is in "a more complicated situation than Putin," said Arcadian, 38, who suggested that Trump can't come across too friendly with Russia because of the ongoing investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Taste of Antigua: Mayan influence drives rising food scene
    By Margo Pfeiff - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    The morning sun has barely peeked up, but Antigua’s Mayan farmers’ market is already swarming with action, a chaotic kaleidoscope of vendors in vivid traditional clothing selling their produce. Guiding me through the Technicolor maze, chef Kenny Aldana points out neon-orange cashew fruit; avocados, mangoes and melons of all sizes and shapes; edible flowers; fresh fish; and meats including bizarre displays of dried iguanas. Bags filled, we return to the El Convento boutique hotel where Aldana holds court in the kitchen. At noon he delivers a market-sourced gourmet feast — chicken bathed in a luscious sauce of pepitoria (traditional roasted and ground squash seeds) with local izote flowers, baby zucchinis and a slice of jicama-like ichuntal lightly battered and fried, perched in a puddle of tomato puree with mild chile. Antigua, with its 18th century cobblestone streets and colonial Spanish architecture that earned it UNESCO World Heritage stature, has long been a cultural destination, charming and walkable with courtyards tucked off main avenues opening into lavish gardens, restaurants, bars and small hotels. “Guatemala is very diverse culturally, and cooks are starting to gain a sense of pride about it,” says New York and Argentina-trained local chef Rodrigo Aguilar, who specializes in pop up restaurants. Recently, a wave of younger cooks is showing our roots in a more globalized way, embracing change but respecting tradition by exploring the richness of our ingredients. The 5,029-foot altitude provides consistent temperatures between 76 and 82 degrees, an idyllic climate the early Spanish dubbed “eternal spring”, perfect for growing just about anything. After an insightful two-hour tour of the mountainside facilities, I sip the premium roast on the sunny dining terrace with a lively group of international caffeine enthusiasts. En route, church bells ring and horse-drawn carriages clatter across cobblestones beneath blossoming jacaranda trees raining mauve petals onto the sidewalk. Exotic hot pink and purple bursts of bougainvillea clamber over stone walls, and the air is filled with the smells of coffee, warm chocolate, tortillas, fresh bread and pastries. Frequent roof-rattling earthquakes that eventually persuaded the Spanish to move their capital to more stable Guatemala City have left picturesque remnants of convents, monasteries, churches, a prison and villas now repurposed as settings for pop-up restaurants, live music concerts, souvenir markets and movie screenings. Earthquakes are the growling side effect of three enormous steep-sided, often-active volcanoes that form the city’s backdrop. “The minerals in volcanic soil are responsible for our intensely flavorful produce,” explains Karin Rudberg of Caoba Farm, an organic farm/shop/learning center and cafe 20 minutes by foot from Antigua’s main square. Caoba also supplies many of Antigua’s best dining spots, and they are a diverse lot, from gourmet delis with innovative lunches like Epicure to traditional Guatemalan and European restaurants or those experimenting with various degrees of fusion. Sabe Rico — “tastes good” — is a welcoming warren of enterprise that includes a local deli, an on-site chocolateria, and a restaurant where fresh, healthy and often vegetarian takes on traditional dishes from enchiladas to chili rellenos are served amid a tropical garden. “I researched food vendors for six months, because I knew people wanted to try street food, but were afraid to get sick,” she says. Street food is actually illegal in Guatemala, but she guides guests to hole-in-the-wall mom-and-pop treasures and through the farmers’ market, where she whips out her Swiss Army knife for tasting bites. Prowling the shop-lined streets, I come across a chocolate museum and the remarkable Dulceria Doña María Gordillo, a landmark 1872 store decorated in religious relics and famous throughout Guatemala for its vast selection of artisan sweets made exactly as nuns did in the city for centuries to raise money. There are macaroons and marzipan, fig delights and candied squash in exquisite forms, but the addictive classic convent candy that will forever haunt me and many expat Guatemalans is canillitas de leche — literally “legs of milk” that melt in your mouth. Fat Cat lists a dozen ways you can have your coffee created, from French press and AeroPress to siphon and Chemex, along with an equally long list of local plantations from which beans are sourced. The coffee is so fresh and smooth that one day I couldn’t resist hitting three cafes, including La Parada and the Refuge, before heading to the rooftop Antigua Brewing Company bar for a craft beer to calm my caffeinated nerves with skyline views of volatile volcanoes. “Pour a little cusha on the floor for the dead,” Jose Mario Aguirre of La Cantina instructs me as a local crowd of hipsters settles into his funky, barn-board bar that, in the afternoon, morphs into an offbeat mixology workshop. The Mayan Drinks and Spirits School introduces keen liquor enthusiasts to cusha, a traditional and largely clandestine Mayan drink distilled from corn and fruit. “Usually we make pepian, tortillas, Guatemalan rice, a plantain desert and a corn flower drink called atol blanco,” says manager Anna Lena Hofmann. There are also frequent daily two-hour tours of the coffee plantations, processing facilities, roasters and including a tasting: $20. Garden cafe features farm-to-table cuisine for lunch and occasional dinners, often with live music.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • After Decades of War, Colombian Farmers Face a New Test: Peace
    By NICHOLAS CASEY - Tuesday Jul 18, 2017

    The FARC rebels have disarmed and joined the government to wean farmers off illicit crops. But in poor villages, the lure of drug money is still strong.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Kellogg's Opens Cereal Cafe in New York's Times Square
    Friday Jul 1, 2016

    Kellogg's opens its first-ever restaurant, a cereal café, in New York City's Times Square on July 4. The menu features playful recipes developed by Momofuku Milk Bar chef Christina Tosi, and build-your-own-bowl options. Video: Carly Marsh/The Wall Street Journal, Photo: Whitney Tressel for The Wall Street Journal

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Greater New York
  • Veeva Systems lawsuit challenges noncompete agreements
    By Peter Blumberg and Sarah McBride - Tuesday Jul 18, 2017

    Veeva Systems Inc., a target of lawsuits over hiring away employees from rivals in life sciences cloud computing, is now trying to turn the tables.In announcing its suit against three companies that have sought court orders to block ex-employees from joining Veeva or allegedly threatened litigation — Medidata Solutions Inc., Quintiles IMS Inc. and Sparta Systems Inc. — Veeva said it’s taking a stand to end a practice it views as anticompetitive.“Employees should have the right to move freely between jobs, advance their careers and improve their lives without fear of being sued by their former employers,” Veeva CEO Peter Gassner said in a statement.Medidata, based in New York City, said it supports and respects the rights of workers to build their careers, but it sued Veeva in January over the defection of five employees, challenging the Pleasanton company’s “illegal targeting and unfair use of our trade secrets.”Typically, a noncompete agreement — which many job candidates in the tech world have to sign as a condition of employment — bars them from working on rival products for a set period of time, say a year, after leaving their current employer.Supporters say they help protect trade secrets and other confidential information and prevent rapid turnover at companies that have made big investments to train employees.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Business and Technology News
farmers table cafe inc new paltz ny