far from boring promotional and print LLC

7014 13th avenue, suite 202
brooklyn, new york 11228

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 01, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4367880

County
SCHENECTADY

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
UNITED STATES CORPORATION AGENTS, INC.
7014 13TH AVENUE, SUITE 202
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, 11228

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - FAR FROM BORING PROMOTIONAL AND PRINT LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • When your communications plateau, think like a clock restorer
    Tuesday Apr 25, 2017

    In the hit podcast S-Town, listeners follow the story of John B. McLemore, an eccentric genius living in rural Alabama. John is a horologist, someone who specializes in the scientific study of time. He has a deep expertise in making and fixing elaborate clocks.

    Most clock repairers approach their work tactically—they can manage to get an old timepiece working again by tinkering with a couple of its parts. The clock might start ticking like new, but it probably won't last too long. By contrast, the best, most sought after horologists, like John, are able to gain an understanding of the whole apparatus—reviving the full machine back to life as originally designed.

    The majority of nonprofit communicators approach their work tactically—like clock restorers who tinker with a few pieces at a time hoping to get the machine ticking. Many nonprofits hit plateaus with their communications efforts because they approach their work in this fashion. They tend to work on “one-off” projects as needed, rather than envisioning their organization’s communications as an interconnected system that should be optimized to reach its goals and support the mission. This might mean working on a new brochure without thinking about how it relates to the website or managing social media without considering how these platforms fit into their broader goals for engagement.

    More nonprofit communicators need to be able to think like expert clock restorers: able to see, build, and fix the whole machine. Approaching communications as a strategic mechanism comprised of interrelated tactics takes effort and investment upfront, but generates stronger results in the end. The website, emails, social media, and print collateral should all be part of an ecosystem of efforts that reinforce and support each other.

    Math For America (MƒA) is a great example of the benefits of building an integrated communications machine for recruitment purposes. MƒA’s fellowships for public school STEM teachers enable educators to hone their skills, collaborate with peers, and access leadership opportunities—all on a generous stipend. But ad-hoc marketing—a brochure, flyer, or email here and there—for their programs wasn’t filling the pipeline with qualified teachers. They had hit a plateau in recruiting qualified educators even though their program was almost too good to be true.

    Limited expertise in marketing theory and strategy meant that staff were creating promotional materials (ads, brochures, flyers, etc.) tactically instead of strategically. Limited knowledge about their audiences meant that Math for America didn’t know how they were being perceived by teachers or what was holding back candidates from applying (and which benefits would motivate them to).

    After researching to uncover what the opportunities and barriers might be from the educators’ point of view, we worked with MƒA to build an informed and motivating machine for their communications efforts. After a year, Math for America’s fellowship programs went from being under-enrolled to over enrolled. They saw a 358%(!) increase in applications for their Master Teacher Fellowship. And because MƒA’s communications team began to think of their marketing as a machine, they shifted away from tinkering with the tactical toward strategic approaches that offer a far greater return on investment.

    If you want to see greater results from your communications efforts, take time to assess (or build) your communications machine. Your best bet is to approach your work like a clock restorer specialist—methodical, strategic, and looking at the whole picture. Chances are you’ll have to tackle some big questions first and put more time in upfront to develop a strategy and plan that is uniquely designed for your nonprofit’s goals and audiences. But it will pay off in the end.

    Are your communications efforts hitting a plateau? Take a look at the whole machine.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Brand Building at the Prospect Park Alliance
    Wednesday Jan 18, 2017

    When I became the head of marketing at the Prospect Park Alliance, the non-profit organization that manages Brooklyn's flagship park in partnership with the City, I was given a marketing professional's dream situation and perhaps biggest challenge: creating a new website for the organization starting on day one—and adding to that, by my own initiative, the freshening of the brand identity.

    The Alliance had just completed the Samuel J. and Ethel LeFrak Center at Lakeside, an award-winning recreation center designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architect, and an infusion of good will and heightened fundraising had provided the resources to take on this project, and in short time and with an ambitious timeline, we kicked off work.

    The project went smoothly and was overall a success, and I attribute this to several steps that were taken along the way:

    Set a strategy

    About a year before I came to the Alliance, the organization hired Big Duck to undertake a brandraising intensive  with leadership and key stakeholders. This valuable process, which identified the Alliance's key audiences, its brand "personality" and the start of key messaging for the organization, served as a valuable strategic road map for our brand refresh and website redesign.

    Consider the Brand History and equity

    For every organization, its history and focus for the future will dictate what direction to take with its brand identity. For the Alliance, we felt that its most recent brand identity, designed by Chermayeff & Geismar in 2002, had resonance with our audiences, so rather than start from scratch, our designers built on that brand equity by streamlining and modernizing our existing mark, and introducing full brand system that played to our key brand characteristics.

    Build Consensus

    I am lucky to work in an environment with colleagues and leadership that were fully supportive of this project – this is not always the case. But even in the best situations, building consensus goes a long way toward ensuring the success of the project. From day one, I assembled a leadership team that was charged with making final decisions on the project, which met a key milestones in the project's development. In each phase of the project, the consultants met with key departments at the Alliance to gather their input and perspective. This not only ensured that the project went smoothly, but in my opinion also improved upon the design work.

    Create a Full Brand System

    Rather than just creating a logo and calling it a new brand identity, our designers fleshed out a full brand system, with our website as the first significant project. At the end of the project, we were provided with a font family, color palette, photography style guide, templates for creating the various types of print materials produced by the organization, letterhead, electronic newsletters, and even a system for branding all the work we do in Prospect Park. Consistency is incredibly important in establishing a brand and raising its profile, and this system was essential for our achieving these goals. Rather than restricting our designers, the new system has provided them with creative approaches for working within the system to produce strong and beautiful materials for our organization.

    The results can be seen in the success of our marketing and fundraising activities – since the launch of our brand identity and website in late 2014, we have grown our email audience by nearly 200 percent, and have additional gains in our fundraising efforts with key audiences.


    Deborah Kirschner is a marketing and communications professional with more than 20 years experience in the non-profit cultural sector. She oversees a full range of marketing and communications activities as the Assistant Vice President of Marketing and Communications at the Prospect Park Alliance, the non-profit organization that sustains, restores and advances Brooklyn's flagship park in partnership with the City. Deborah was responsible for the development and implementation of a new brand identity for the organization, as well as the launch of a new website, and is currently spearheading the marketing and promotional activities around the Park's 150th anniversary celebration.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Cyclist Killed by Bus in New York’s First Citi Bike Fatality
    By MATTHEW HAAG and HANNAH ALANI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Dan Hanegby of Brooklyn fell under a bus’s tires in Chelsea. He worked for Credit Suisse and was once the top-ranked tennis player in Israel.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Magnetohydrodynamics
    Friday Jun 16, 2017

    Source: xkcd.com
  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • How Letterpress Printing Came Back from the Dead
    By Glenn Fleishman - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Digital methods are reinventing Gutenberg's signature letterpress as the darling of the DIY world.

    Source: Webmonkey
  • How Letterpress Printing Came Back from the Dead
    By Glenn Fleishman - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Digital methods are reinventing Gutenberg's signature letterpress as the darling of the DIY world.

    Source: Webmonkey