draper hall developers LLC

98 cutter mill road
suite 342 south
great neck, new york 11021

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 15, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4472644

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - DRAPER HALL DEVELOPERS LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Little Games, Big Engagement
    Friday Sep 23, 2011

    One of the challenges brands often face when they look at getting into gaming is cost and time. Concepting a game people will actually play takes a great deal of time and specialized skills. But sometimes, the simplest games can engage thousands of people if the right circumstances come together.

    Source: Media Post: Gaming Insider
  • High-Net-Worth Michiganders: Time to “Get Off the Dime,” Brophy Says
    By Sarah Schmid Stevenson - Friday Jun 9, 2017

    When the Michigan Venture Capital Association (MVCA) unveiled the findings in its 2017 annual report at a public event in April, there was a lot to celebrate: a 48 percent increase in venture-backed startups over the past five years; every dollar invested by a Michigan firm attracting $4.61 in out-of-state capital; and a total of […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Mobile, Desktop Even In Race For Video Eyeballs
    Friday Mar 3, 2017

    Mobile phones and desktops are neck-and-neck when it comes to video viewing. More than half, or about 57%, of consumers around the world watch videos on their mobile phones every day. That's on par with the 58% of consumers who are checking out videos on their computer, according to AOL's State of the Video Industry Global Research Study.

    Source: Media Post: Video Insider
  • Vanderbilt Receives $10 Million for College Halls Program
    By webmaster@philanthropynewsdigest.org (Matt Sinclair) - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    The anonymous gift will support an initiative to establish living–learning communities in residential colleges on campus....

    Source: Philanthropy News Digest (PND)
  • Boston Event Showcases Entrepreneurs of Color: Photo Slideshow
    By Jeff Engel - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    When Ed Gaskin visited a high school class in Boston where students—many of them people of color—were writing code to create video games, he asked them if they had ever considered becoming an entrepreneur. Each student said no, he says. Gaskin is the executive director of Greater Grove Hall Main Streets, a nonprofit economic development […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Rooted in Counterculture, Whole Foods’ Founder Finds an Unlikely Refuge
    By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    John Mackey wanted to fight off the activist investors attacking Whole Foods. He found a savior in Amazon, a company blamed for laying waste to retailers.

    Source: NYT > Home Page