do it all property improvement, inc

8625-1 transit rd.
suite 1-a
east amherst, new york 14051

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ACTIVE

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SEPTEMBER 09, 2014

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4633464

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ERIE

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NEW YORK

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NONE

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DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

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2014 - DO IT ALL PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT, INC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Give Your Property Or Client A Brand Audit For Valentine's Day
    Tuesday Feb 14, 2017

    On a day where we are supposed to recognize and appreciate what makes our loved ones special, it strikes me that sports marketers should pause to do the same for their clients or properties. Hopefully, we all subscribe to the truth that a fundamental strategic function of sports marketing is to properly align brands and properties that "fit together."

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Sports
  • A High School Without Textbooks
    Tuesday Oct 8, 2013

    Archbishop Stepinac High School, in White Plains, N.Y., is one of the first schools in the U.S. to do away with paper textbooks. Instead, the all-boys prep school requires students to use tablets and laptops in class. (Data provided by Statista.com.)

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Journal Reports
  • Tenement Museum in New York Names Its New President
    By JOSHUA BARONE - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    Kevin Jennings, a former nonprofit leader and Obama official, plans to expand the museum’s reach through virtual and augmented reality.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • A car park space in Hong Kong just sold for the low low price of $664,260
    By Yvette Tan - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    In a city where land is sparse, even parking lots go for a premium.

    A parking space in Hong Kong has been sold for a record $664,260 (HK$ 5.18 million) — making it the most expensive parking space in the world, according to the South China Morning Post.

    At just 188 square feet, or 17.5 square metres, that works out to a staggering $3,500 per square foot. 

    To put things in context, apartments in New York went for an average price of $1,750 per square foot, in mid-2016. 

    A micro-apartment in New York

    Image: Jacobson/AP/REX/Shutterstock

    The buyer of the parking lot, an executive director of an investment firm in Hong Kong, already has two other parking spaces in the luxury apartment complex in the West of the island. Read more...

    More about Hong Kong, Parking Lot, Car Park, Property Prices, and World

    Source: Mashable!
  • Very good doggo shoos bear from owner's property
    By Laura Vitto - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Read more...

    More about Animals, Wochit, Culture, and Web Culture

    Source: Mashable!
  • Boston to Baghdad: The Man Behind New England's Shootout for Soldiers Event
    By msilva - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    M

    ike Sullivan and lacrosse have long been in a love affair of sorts.

    It began in 1980s in Bardonia, N.Y., when Sullivan started playing in middle school. Eventually he made it to West Point and played two years of Division I lacrosse at Army. “Sully,” as he’s affectionately known, even played club lacrosse while stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, and while he was overseas in Kaiserslautern, Germany. His family also attends nearly every Boston Cannons home game. He serves on the board of the Eastern Massachusetts Chapter of US Lacrosse.

    Now 45 and a lieutenant colonel, Sullivan has taken his passion to another realm: organizing Boston’s Shootout For Soldiers event, which will commence its third rendition Friday at 7 p.m. Eastern at UMass Lowell.

    “While in Boston, I got an incredible feel for how lacrosse was growing, but also the patriotism and pride I saw in the community,” said Sullivan, who is wrapping up his doctorate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts. “This was only a year after the Boston Marathon bombing, and things that caught my eye were everything from American flags to how much they seemed to respect the service members.”

    So Sullivan reached out to Tyler Steinhardt, the executive director of Shootout for Soldiers, and they ironed out the details of expanding to Beantown. The event, which features 24 hours of lacrosse and raises money to support American veterans, started in 2015 with 600 players and 3,200 attendees raising $26,170.

    That first year, Sullivan said there were plenty of hurdles, like having enough teams to play and working with Harvard, the host site. Last year, Shootout for Soldiers Boston expanded to the complex at UMass Lowell and raised $56,586. Forty-one teams registered for this year’s event with hopes of raising $75,000 for four national and two local military charities. 

    Category: 
    Fuel
    Author: 
    Jonathan Sigal
    Body Section One: 

    Sullivan said the point of Shootout for Soldiers Boston isn’t the money raised, but rather bringing the lacrosse community together and offering educational resources to veterans of the armed services. It helps, too, he said, that some “pretty cool” stories come out of the day.

    “We start with the veterans game, and last year we had three Vietnam vets, one guy who brought his old bucket helmet and wooden stick with him,” Sullivan said. “It looked like he was stepping out of a history book. The goalie on my team lost his leg in Afghanistan in 2012, so he's out there playing with a prosthetic limb.”

    Stories aside, partners and fellow organizers say that Sullivan truly is the lifeblood of Shootout for Soldiers Boston.

    It’s a sentiment echoed by Kevin Barney, the vice president and general manager of the Cannons. For this year’s event, the Cannons are expected to send Josh Hawkins and several other players to guest coach and interact with fans.

    “The event itself is something the Cannons saw as a great way for us to support our military veterans on a national and local level,” Barney said. “It’s a unique event and great opportunity and something we’re happy to get behind. Then when Mike Sullivan took over, it made it easier. A great guy who’s supportive of us and we obviously wanted to return that and support something he’s very passionate about.”

    Steinhardt went a step further, saying Sullivan has grabbed the event by the horns and “just run with it” the last few years. 

    “If you look at a Venn diagram of people who love lacrosse and work in the military, Sully fits exactly in the middle,” Steinhardt said. “He’s a guy who cares deeply about both. It comes from a place of genuine care and authenticity that really drives the event. It’s what fueled Boston to grow so rapidly.”

    Quote: 
    “If you look at a Venn diagram of people who love lacrosse and work in the military, Sully fits exactly in the middle.” — Tyler Steinhardt, executive director of Shootout for Soldiers
    Image Parallax: 
    Body Section Two: 

    While praise for Sullivan and Shootout for Soldiers Boston go hand in hand, the organization also hosts events on a national scale. In all, 11 cities ranging from Dana Point, Calif. to Aurora, Colo., to Baltimore hold similar days. A recent event in Baltimore raised a Shootout for Soldiers-record $201,738.

    And if Sullivan’s plans unfold, their portfolio will expand even further.

    On July 2, he’s shipping out to Baghdad, Iraq for a yearlong deployment. There’s a group of about 20 guys at the American embassy who play lacrosse on a turf field, Sullivan said, but often lack enough equipment. Thus, Sullivan, who works with Operation Baggataway, a charity that donates used lacrosse gear to service members, plans to bring sticks and more.

    With that, he hopes to launch a Shootout for Soldiers Baghdad.

    “There’s no way we can play for 24 hours, but even if we just do two or three hours and maybe do a live stream of what we’re doing and tell people about where the different players are from and their jobs in Iraq are, I think it’d be a neat opportunity,” Sullivan said. “It’d educate people about why we’re still there and how lacrosse weaves into everything we do. Once I get on the ground, I'm going to try and make it happen.”

    Sullivan’s hope for expansion does not stop there, though. 

    Upon returning from his deployment, the military will send him and his family to a currently unknown city, where he plans on starting another Shootout for Soldiers event. And even while stationed in Baghdad, Sullivan plans on helping organize the Boston event in 2018, much to his wife’s chagrin.

    He’ll have plenty of help, though, mainly Rachael Rennie, who will take over and he dubbed his “partner in crime.” 

    “Mike’s been a huge all-around life mentor,” Rennie said. “I’m going to miss him like crazy and it’ll be sad to see him go, but I’m looking forward to filling his shoes. I know what we need to do, I just have to set aside the time. It’ll be a struggle for sure, but I’m excited for it.”

    Body Section Three: 

    All things considered, Shootout for Soldiers Boston has grown by leaps and bounds, with Sullivan at the center of it all.

    It’s led to guys like Joe Cardona, the long snapper for the New England Patriots, and Margo McAuley, a broadcaster on Lacrosse Sports Network, coming out. This year’s event will even feature a Tufts alumni team, with former head coach Mike Daly and current head coach Casey D'Annolfo expected to show.

    But, at the end of the day, Sullivan has a simple message regarding what Shootout for Soldiers Boston is all about.

    “I tell everyone I get the opportunity to tell, the service members that deploy, we have the easier job, as much as people don’t believe me,” Sullivan said. “It’s the spouses, the husbands, the wives, the same-sex partners that stay back who I think have the much tougher job. This day really lets us all come together and experience what that’s all about.”

    Short Summary: 
    Lt. Col. Mike Sullivan, organizer of this weekend's Shootout for Soldiers in Boston, deploys to Iraq July 2.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photographer Main Image: 
    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHOOTOUT FOR SOLDIERS
    Photographer Parallax: 
    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHOOTOUT FOR SOLDIERS
    Photo Main Caption: 
    Lt. Col. Mike Sullivan, a former Army lacrosse player, deploys to Baghdad on July 2.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    “Sully” organizes Shootout for Soldiers Boston, which will draw 41 teams this weekend to UMass Lowell with hopes of raising at least $75,000 for national and local military charities.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine
  • Mearns Excited to Recruit, 'Build a Winner' at St. Bonaventure
    By mhamilton - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    St. Bonaventure announced Tuesday that it was hiring former Canisius and Canadian national team coach Randy Mearns to lead its newly founded men's lacrosse program. Mearns, who won the 2014 FIL World Cup gold medal with Canada, spent 19 seasons at Canisius before making the short jump to St. Bonaventure. During his time with the Golden Griffins, Mearns advanced to two NCAA tournaments and had nine players selected in the MLL or NLL drafts. 

    Mearns spoke with US Lacrosse Magazine about his vision for the Bonnies lacrosse program, which will officially begin playing at the Division I level in 2018-19, and his excitement for a new challenge.

    How do you sum up the opportunity that you’ve been presented with at St. Bonaventure?

    I’m very excited about the opportunity. It’s something that you dream about, having the opportunity. It was kind of a side thought, they were just gong to start Division I lacrosse at St. Bonaventure. That’s like news. It’s like Utah coming out. ‘Hey, wow, another Division I program. This is great. Growth of the game, where’s it all going, love it, love it, love it.’ I had the opportunity to listen to a podcast with [Athletic Director] Tim Kenney and kind of understand what they were going to do. You could hear the enthusiasm. You hear it and you just move on. I wrapped up the season and all that good stuff. Then, through some third parties, they were like ‘Hey, we feel like you’d be a good fit. You should be a short list guy. What are your thoughts on that?’ I said I appreciate that. I had to explore it a little bit more and figure out what they were really trying to do.

    I talked to my wife first and talked to [Cansius AD] Bill Maher and he was great through this whole process. I said ‘Hey, I just feel like I need to go explore this. I’m just interested to see what this is.’ … I had the opportunity to get up on campus and meet people. I hadn’t been up on campus for 25 years or so. I can’t recall whether it was ’91 or ’92 when I actually played against St. Bonaventure. I rolled up on campus and I was like ‘Wow. Look at this place.’ It’s like a gem in the rolling hills of the Allegheny.’ … All of a sudden, I didn’t sleep for three days. it’s a big life decision. At the end of the day, I was ready for a new opportunity. I said ‘Let’s take a bite out of this apple and let’s create this vision with a lot of energy.'

    What are the first steps to building this new program?

    We can build a foundation and I’d like to say a new foundation. There’s probably 70, 80, 90, I think they call them the godfathers. Because back in the day St. Bonaventure did have men’s lacrosse. I played against them. I actually got smoked against them. From what I hear, they are super pumped because lacrosse is back at their institution. We can start to reconnect with them, that’s the first order of business.

    The second is to hire an assistant coach full-time. The third thing is to get on the road recruiting and start to build this program. I couldn’t be more excited. In some sense, you go through it and you take a leap of faith at times, but sometimes change is good. I’m proud and honored and humbled to be this guy leading a whole new generation of St. Bonaventure lacrosse.

    Category: 
    College
    Author: 
    Matt Hamilton
    Body Section One: 

    What was the prevailing factor that led you to join St. Bonaventure?

    It’s probably a couple things. It was a really good fit from a family standpoint. Just vision. We want to win there. We want to win it all. How do we get there? We know it’s going to take a little bit of time. You see it happening. You watch Marquette do it. I competed against Monmouth and watched Coach Fisher do that. Ryan Polley and Boston U and Richmond. You see this evolution of how to build a program right from the start with a clean slate. Then, in three, four or five years, you’re just nationally recognized. You’re getting to the NCAAs.

    It's just a blank canvas and now I can utilize 19 years of ups and downs and all those experiences and memories. I learned a lot of it, in the early years, by trial and error. So now I can sit there and say ‘Where can I go with this?’ Understanding the vision. We’re going to be fully funded and looking to really make an impact in the sport of lacrosse at St. Bonaventure. Tomorrow will be my first official day and then the journey begins.

    How is recruiting different from a small, private school like St. Bonaventure, as opposed to a new program at a larger school like Utah?

    You have to find the right kids. They have to have high academics. The academics at St. Bonaventure are phenomenal. You have to find the kids that don’t mind and are intrigued about a smaller campus as opposed to a bigger campus. You have to find those right fit kids who are looking to live a dream and have goals. Then I reflect and I can sit there and analyze every high school program in the United States, let alone all the connections in Canada that’s not far away. In my mind, I’m doing rough math, but there’s 42,000 juniors looking for homes. I feel like I got to be able to find 24-30 guys my first year.

    With the resources that I have, I’m extremely confident that we’re going to be able to get that done. Is that a metric of Western New York and upstate and down the 90 with Rochester and Syracuse, the Albanys, Southern Ontario, Michigan, Pennsylvanoa, Ohio? At the same time, there’s a lot of good lacrosse everywhere. There’s kids that are legit everywhere. Now it’s a function of not leaving any stone unturned and start to utilize all the contacts and connections and start to try to find those right fit student athletes that have those goals. There’s only 72 Division I lacrosse programs and I feel I can get those guys.

    Quote: 
    At the end of the day, I was ready for a new opportunity. I said ‘Let’s take a bite out of this apple and let’s create this vision with a lot of energy.' - Saint Bonaventure coach Randy Mearns
    Image Parallax: 
    Body Section Two: 

    How helpful is it that St. Bonaventure sits in a lacrosse-rich region?

    It’s going to help tremendously. There’s so much lacrosse around the area. That small little area  is like an untapped market. There’s not really a lot of lacrosse. They’ve been trying to grow the game there with youth lacrosse. There's lacrosse all around. Theres competition. Obviously, from a Canisius standpoint, a Hobart standpoint, Syracuse — as everyone starts to evolve, you try to find what that right little geographical area is for you, where you can make some inroads.

    You can see as the game's continued to evolve and grow, rosters are starting to evolve into areas or have players from areas that maybe you don’t necessarily always go and recruit. Again, we’re going to try to make an impact in the upstate market, absolutely. We’re going to make an impact on the Southern Ontario market. We’re going to try to make an impact in Pennsylvania and Ohio and Michigan. I don’t want to sit there and say ‘Hey, we’re just going to focus on and 90-mile radius.’ But we will focus on that. There’s just too much lacrosse being played and too many good players all over the country and in Canada that if we’re doing the things that we need to do, we can find those guys. That’s the exciting part about this.

    Mark Matthews texted me congratulations, which was awesome and I’m happy he did that and appreciated it. He said ‘Hey, maybe I’ll come play for you because I have a year of eligibility.’ I said obviously he didn't and we laughed about it. He was like ‘Good luck with the squad next year,’ I was like ‘I don’t have any players.’ There’s some club lacrosse at St. Bonaventure so I’m excited to coach and see what’s there. There’s just this energy. It’s there. With all the experiences that I’ve had over 19 years and the international experience, having the opportunity to work with guys like John Grant Jr., that whole thing. As I continue to evolve, we have to find those guys, because they had the opportunity to evolve in college, as well. They were dreaming of playing in the NLL and the MLL and internationally. You have to have that goal already in mind, or that marriage won't work.

    How would you characterize the attitude toward lacrosse on campus?

    Everybody on campus is pumped. It checks a lot of boxes. It’s a sport that in short order, if you fund it correctly, you can get to a level that you’re nationally recognized, and that’s great for St. Bonaventure University. You have the opportunity to recruit and make some inroads maybe in some states and areas that St. Bonaventure, people there aren’t familiar with. From an enrollment standpoint, there’s an advantage to that because more kids are coming to the institution.

    Then you’re talking about building an alumni base, which will take a little bit of time. They are excited and ready to go and tackle this vision. Even within all the other sports, what [Athletic Director] Tim Kenney has been able to do there, with a new softball field and upgrading sports in terms of resources. There’s a really nice momentum moving forward. That’s exciting to be a part of. We talk and here’s what they say. They say ‘Listen, if you can just get them to come to campus, they’ll commit. You just have to get them there.’ That’s where I’m just like, ‘yeah, I can build a winner here.’

    Body Section Three: 

    Are you planning on making a connection with the Native American tribes in the area?

    Obviously, we’re going to make some inroads. I have a relationship with some of those guys; Six Nation and Onondaga. Now, it’s a function of nurturing and starting to develop those relationships to a higher bond. At the end of the day, they are phenomenal lacrosse players. Are you kidding me? You look at Zed Williams and Zach Miller. They are countless. Then you have to say ‘What are you looking for?’ There’s an academic component to it. What’s the level that they are trying to play? Just like any other recruit. Now, it’s a function of making inroads, because it’s right in our back yard. it’s right there. That’s an exciting opportunity to try to take advantage. It’s part of the blank slate that we have. How do we build it? What relationships can we lean on immediately? What relationships can we start to develop? How do we introduce St. Bonaventure lacrosse to the world? The first couple years, there will be obstacles, but anything worthwhile doing is not easy.

    Where do you want this program to be in 5-10 years?

    I want to win a national championship. That’s just simple. That’s my goal. To do that, you have to have those resources. You have to have the right players. It’s hard to do. If I’m not talking about winning a national championship — for me, with the experiences from an international standpoint and playing experience with winning up in Canada — all of that stuff is my goal. That’s the goal we should be reaching for. We have to find a conference. Is it hard to win a conference championship? Hell yeah. It absolutely is. There’s so much great lacrosse being played at the Division I level.

    What conference do you see this program joining?

    We haven’t had too many of those conversations at this point. We know it would be strategically important to be within a conference because of the AQ. The lacrosse landscape continues to change. Off the get-go, is the application from a MAAC standpoint? Is it an NEC? Do those conferences need any more members? Is it America East? I don’t know what that is at this point. I know this: There are five programs out there that are independent. What’s that metric look like? There are four A-10 schools. What happens in five years? Are there more A-10 schools?

    I feel the growth of the game, and from a revenue standpoint to institutions, the landscape will continue to change. When Utah announced that they were adding it, that’s huge for lacrosse, just like St. Bonaventure adding. Any time there’s another program being added, it changes the landscape. I equate it to my old PLPA days. It’s like ‘Hey for those students out there wanting to play Division I lacrosse, another 40-45 jobs just opened up.’ That will work itself out. We’re hopeful that we can get into a conference.

    Short Summary: 
    Newly appointed Saint Bonaventure men's coach Randy Mearns spoke with us about his vision for the program.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photo Main Caption: 
    Randy Mearns was hired Tuesday to lead St. Bonaventure's first Division I men's lacrosse team.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    Mearns was an assistant for Team Canada in 2006 and 2010 before leading the team to the gold medal in 2014.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine
  • Lincoln-Sudbury Claims State Title to Round Out Final Nike/USL HSB Top 25
    By mschneider - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    The Northeast and Midwest regions wrapped up their seasons over the weekend, but there were no changes in the Nike/US Lacrosse High School Boys' Top 25.

    No. 16 Lincoln-Sudbury (Mass.), the last of the Top 25 to finish its 2017 campaign, claimed its third straight state title, defeating Acton Boxborough (Mass.) 9-7 and Boston College High (Mass.) 8-7.

    Skip to: National | Northeast | Mid-Atlantic | South | Midwest | West
    Category: 
    High School
    Author: 
    Laurel Pfahler
    Body Section One: 

    National Top 25

     
    June 20, 2017

    W/L

    Prev

    Next

    1 Landon (Md.) 21-0 1 Season complete (IAC champion) 2 Darien (Conn.) 23-0 2 Season complete (Class L champion) 3 Culver Academy (Ind.) 21-1 3 Season complete 4 Cold Spring Harbor (N.Y.) 21-0 4 Season complete (Class C champion) 5 St. Ignatius (Calif.) 19-2 5 Season complete (WCAL champion) 6 Delbarton (N.J.) 21-1 6 Season compete (NJSIAA Non-Public A champion/TOC winner) 7 Calvert Hall (Md.) 17-2 7 Season complete (MIAA-A champion) 8 Ward Melville (N.Y.) 20-2 8 Season complete (Class A champion) 9 McDonogh (Md.) 17-4 9 Season complete (MIAA runner-up) 10 Chaminade (N.Y.) 11-4 10 Season complete (CHSAA AAA Champ) 11 Jamesville-DeWitt (N.Y.) 21-2 11 Season complete (Class C runner-up) 12 La Salle College High (Pa.) 21-2 12 Season complete 13 Bullis (Md.) 18-3 13 Season complete (IAC runner-up) 14 Severna Park (Md.) 20-0 14 Season complete (MPSAA 4A/3A champion) 15 Victor (N.Y.) 19-3 15 Season complete (Class B champion) 16 Lincoln-Sudbury (Mass.) 19-1 16 Season complete (Division I state champion) 17 Pittsford (N.Y.) 19-2 17 Season complete (Class A runner-up) 18 Smithtown East (N.Y.) 15-4 18 Season complete 19 Haverford School (Pa.) 16-7 19 Season complete 20 Boys' Latin (Md.) 14-5 20 Season complete 21 Avon Grove (Pa.) 23-2 21 Season complete (PIAA 3A champion) 22 Yorktown (N.Y.) 17-5 22 Season complete (Class B runner-up) 23 Conestoga (Pa.) 22-4 23 Season complete (PIAA 3A runner-up) 24 Manhasset (N.Y.) 15-2 24 Season complete 25 Bridgewater-Raritan (N.J.) 17-1 25 Season complete
    Also considered: Massapequa (N.Y.), Malvern Prep (Pa.), St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.), Springfield-Delco (Pa.), Moorestown (N.J.), Cherry Creek (Colo.)
    Quote: 
    Check back to USLaxMagazine.com each Tuesday next year for national and regional rankings and top performers.
    AD Spot: 
    Image Parallax: 
    Body Section Two: 
    Nike/US Lacrosse High School Rankings
    National Boys' Top 25 | National Girls' Top 25
    Northeast Boys' Top 10 | Northeast Girls' Top 10
    Mid-Atlantic Boys' Top 10 | Mid-Atlantic Girls' Top 10
    South Boys' Top 10
    | South Girls' Top 10
    Midwest Boys' Top 10
    | Midwest Girls' Top 10
    West Boys' Top 10
    | West Girls' Top 10

    Northeast Top 10

    1. Darien (Conn.), 23-0

    The Blue Wave claimed their fourth consecutive Class L state title with a 16-3 win over Cheshire (Conn.) and pushed their winning streak to 54 games. The championship was their 13th overall. Previous: 1

    2. Cold Spring Harbor (N.Y.), 21-0

    The Seahawks, who have won 28 straight games, earned their third straight state title with a hard-fought 11-9 decision over Jamesville-DeWitt (N.Y.) in the Class C final. They have two losses combined over the past three championship seasons. Previous: 2

    3. Ward Melville (N.Y.), 20-2

    The Patriots’ ninth state title came with a dramatic 10-9 overtime win against Pittsford (N.Y.) in the Class A championship. Ward Melville trailed 9-4 with 4:26 remaining in the fourth quarter and was still down 9-6 with 1:01 left in regulation. Previous: 3

    4. Chaminade (N.Y.), 11-4

    The Flyers were awarded the CHSAA Class AAA championship after the CHSAA sanctioned St. Anthony’s (N.Y.) for using an illegible player this season, canceling the title game with a forfeit and stripping the Friars of all their wins. Previous: 4

    5. Jamesville-DeWitt (N.Y.), 21-2

    J-D built a 5-1 lead in the second quarter, but couldn’t hold on in an 11-9 loss to Cold Spring Harbor (N.Y.) in the Class C state final. The Red Rams’ only other loss was to Yorktown (N.Y.) on April 11. Previous: 5

    6. Victor (N.Y.), 19-3

    The Blue Devils were dominant in a 9-3 win over Yorktown (N.Y.) in the Class B final, as they collected their third consecutive state championship. Previous: 6

    7. Lincoln-Sudbury (Mass.), 19-1

    The Warriors topped Acton Boxborough (Mass.), 9-7, in the Division I North final, then followed with an 8-7 win over Boston College High (Mass.) in the state championship game as L-S claimed its third straight state title. The Warriors built a 5-0 lead early and an 8-4 lead after three quarters in the final, and Jack Sutherland led the way with three goals. Previous: 7

    8. Pittsford (N.Y.), 19-2

    The Panthers just missed out on their first state title, dropping the Class A championship in heart-breaking fashion against Ward Melville. Pittsford led 9-4 with 4:26 left in regulation but gave up the game’s final six goals as the Patriots stole a 10-9 win in overtime. Previous: 8

    9. Smithtown East (N.Y.), 15-4

    The Bulls’ season ended with a 9-8 loss to Ward Melville (N.Y.) in the Suffolk County Class A title game late last month. Connor DeSimone finished the season with 60 goals and 54 assists, while MIchael Latini had 48 goals and 17 assists. All of East’s losses were by one goal, including a regular-season loss to Ward Melville. Previous: 9

    10. Yorktown (N.Y.), 17-5

    Yorktown closed the season with a 9-3 loss to Victor in the Class B state final after earning a thrilling overtime win over Garden City (N.Y.) in the semifinals. Previous: 10

    — Will Cleveland

    Mid-Atlantic Top 10 (season complete)

    1. Landon (Md.), 21-0

    The Bears were rarely tested on the way to an IAC title that closed a perfect season. They finished in style by beating Bullis (Md.), 18-7, in the championship May 12. Joey Epstein (Johns Hopkins) piled up 75 goals and 48 assists for the season, and Justin Shockey (Navy) won 79 percent of his face-offs. Previous: 1

    2. Delbarton (N.J.), 21-1

    The Green Wave blasted Moorestown (N.J.), 15-9, on Saturday to claim their second straight NJSIAA Tournament of Champions title and third in the last four years. They let an eight-goal lead shrink to three in the fourth quarter but recovered to pull away late. Michael Long, Luca Tria (Cornell) and Matt Campbell scored three goals apiece. Delbarton beat Ramapo, 10-4, earlier in the week to earn a spot in the final. Previous: 2

    3. Calvert Hall (Md.), 17-2

    The Cardinals left no doubt about their spot atop the MIAA-A, closing with a 12-6 win over McDonogh (Md.) in the championship May 25. After two early losses, they finished the spring with 15 straight victories. Jacob Kelly (North Carolina) hit his scoring stride in the run and finished with a team-best 47 goals and 44 assists. Previous: 3

    4. McDonogh (Md.), 17-4

    The Eagles came up short in their bid for a repeat MIAA-A title, falling 12-6 to Calvert Hall in the championship May 25. Their nonconference résumé included defeats of heavyweights Chaminade (N.Y.), Haverford School (Pa.) and Bullis (Md.). McDonogh put five players on the all-conference team, including defensive stalwarts B.J. Farrare, Brandon Shure and Chris Smith. Previous: 4

    5. La Salle (Pa.), 21-2

    The Explorers tripped up short of a Pennsylvania state title, falling to Central Bucks East (Pa.), 8-6, in a June 3 quarterfinal. The loss finished an impressive season highlighted by a Philadelphia Catholic League title and wins over a handful of traditional Pennsylvania powers. Brett Baskin (Johns Hopkins) was named PCL MVP after tallying 41 goals and 23 assists. Previous: 5

    6. Bullis (Md.), 18-3

    The Bulldogs put together another strong résumé but settled for runner-up in the IAC after losing 18-7 to top-ranked Landon in the final May 12. Alex Trippi (North Carolina) posted 54 goals and 61 assists this season and finishes as the program’s all-time leading scorer. Previous: 6

    7. Severna Park (Md.), 20-0

    The Falcons were perfect en route to a repeat Maryland 4A/3A title. They finished in dramatic fashion, beating Churchill (Md.), 7-6, in the May 24 final on a goal by Jack Thomas with three seconds left in regulation. UMBC-bound Trevor Patschorke posted 83 goals for an explosive club that averaged 15.8 goals per game. Previous: 7

    8. Haverford School (Pa.), 16-7

    The Fords ended a second straight season with a loss to Culver Academy Prep (Ind.) in the Inter-Ac Invitational final. They couldn’t get much going offensively in a 9-5 defeat on May 21. It was still another strong season for Haverford with a handful of notable wins against a brutal schedule and an outright conference regular season title. Luke O’Grady (Providence) did his part in pacing a new-look attack with 56 goals. Previous: 8

    9. Boys’ Latin (Md.), 14-5

    The Lakers earned the No. 2 seed in the MIAA-A tournament but had their season end in the semifinals with an 11-8 loss to McDonogh on May 22. After a nice run midseason to get to the top of the conference standings, they closed the spring with three losses in their final four games. Matt Brandau (Yale) set the offensive pace with 36 goals and 34 assists. Previous: 10

    10.  Avon Grove (Pa.), 23-2

    Zach Augustine’s double-overtime goal Saturday gave the Red Devils a 5-4 win over then-national No. 20 Conestoga (Pa.) and their first Pennsylvania (PIAA 3A) state title. They had to go to the extra period after allowing the tying goal with one second left in regulation. Avon Grove got through to the final by beating Central Bucks East, 7-5, on Wednesday, boosted by two goals from Augustine. Previous: NR

    — Eric Detweiler

    Body Section Three: 

    South Top 10 (season complete)

    1. St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.), 21-1

    The Raiders claimed their second consecutive state championship with a 12-7 win over Lake Highland Prep (Fla.). STA has not lost to a Florida team since May of 2015. 

    2. Dallas Jesuit (Texas), 15-5

    The Rangers ended the season by winning their second consecutive THSLL state championship. They are the first repeat THSLL champion since 2010. 

    3. Lassiter (Ga.), 17-4

    The Trojans beat Lambert (Ga.) 10-5 to win their first GHSA 6A/7A state championship since 2006, ending Lambert’s in-state win streak at 39 games and avenging last year’s title game loss. Colvin Prosser led with four goals in the weather-delayed game, while Nolan Moon scored three goals, Choice Mostellar added two and Justin Edwards one. The Trojans came back from down 4-1 early to beat Allatoona 11-9 in the semifinals. 

    4.  Lambert (Ga.), 20-2

    The Longhorns rallied past Centennial (Ga.), 12-7, to advance to the GHSA 6A/7A state championship game, but were denied a repeat title with a 10-5 loss to Lassiter in a weather-delayed final. Alex Walker scored two goals for Lambert. Eric Overbay, Kyle Lewis and Bradley Wehmon had one each. 

    5. Middle Creek (N.C.), 22-0

    The Mustangs finished off a perfect season to claim their first ever state title. They beat Lake Norman 17-8 on Saturday to win the NCHSAA 4A championship. Middle Creek fell behind early, but put together a strong second quarter to take an 8-4 lead at halftime. Senior Jake Medwar led the Mustangs with five goals, and Patrick Tanner and Owen Caputo scored four each, while Graham Schwartz won 19 of 25 faceoffs. Middle Creek got to the finals by upending perennial power and previously-ranked Cardinal Gibbons (N.C.) 17-4 in the semifinals.

    6. Episcopal School of Dallas (Texas), 18-1

    The Eagles advanced to the THSLL title game, but fell short of the title when Dallas Jesuit rallied for a 9-8 win. ESD had beaten Jesuit 7-5 on April 28. 

    7. The Woodlands (Texas), 23-1

    The Highlanders, top-seeded in the THSLL Final Four, lost to Episcopal Dallas, 11-8, in the state semifinals. The Woodlands owns five out-of-state wins. 

    8. Weddington (N.C.), 19-1

    The Warriors scored 12 second-quarter goals on their way to a 21-6 win over Cedar Ridge in the NCHSAA 1A/2A/3A state championship for their first state title. Austin Leonard led with five goals, while Hunter Fasanaro had four. The Warriors beat Cuthbertson (N.C.) 21-6 to advance to the title game. Leonard scored five goals, Fasanaro had four goals and three assists and James Shipley had four goals and an assist in that win. Whitner Litton collected nine groundballs and won 23 of 29 faceoffs.

    9. Memphis University School (Tenn.), 16-3

    The Owls won their second consecutive TSLA state title when Cade Klawinski scored in the second overtime to beat McCallie School (Tenn.) 9-8. The game was forced to overtime after a flurry of late goals in regulation. Daniel Shumake gave MUS an 8-6 lead with 50 seconds left, but McCallie scored two quick goals to send it to overtime. The Owls beat Christian Brothers (Tenn.) 12-4 in the semifinals to advance to the title game. 

    10. Ponte Vedra (Fla.), 19-2

    The Sharks’ promising season ended in an upset in the second round of the Florida state play-in games. Their only other loss was to Jupiter, and they had three strong out-of-state wins. 

    — Aimee Ford Foster     

    Midwest Top 10

    1. Culver Prep Academy (Ind.), 21-1

    The Eagles concluded their season on May 20 by winning the Inter-Ac Invitational in Philadelphia. They beat nationally-ranked Haverford School (Pa.) in the final to avenge their lone loss of the season. Culver, which is ranked third nationally, also had notable in-region wins over Brother Rice (Mich.) and New Trier (Ill.). Goalie Matt Schmidt blocked 169 of the 219 shots he faced this season for a 77.2 percent save rate. Previous: 1

    2. Brother Rice (Mich.), 20-4

    The Warriors clinched their 13th straight state championship with an 8-7 victory over Detroit Catholic Central (Mich.) on June 10, following an 8-6 win over Rockford (Mich.) in the semifinals. Brother Rice had 10 first-team all-state selections, led by Michigan’s Mr. Lacrosse Jack Kelly. Previous: 2

    3. Cathedral (Ind.), 21-4

    The Irish finished 2017 with their second-straight state title, defeating Carmel (Ind.) 8-5 in the final June 3 to avenge their lone in-state loss. After an 0-2 start to the season, Cathedral bounced back with wins against Cincinnati St. Xavier (Ohio) and Brother Rice (Mich.), and its only other setback was against Canadian power Everest Academy. Kavan Braun led the way for Cathedral. Previous: 3

    4. New Trier (Ill.), 20-4

    The Trevians were crowned Illinois state champs on June 3 following their 9-6 win over Loyola Academy (Ill.), which avenged a 7-6 loss from April 29. New Trier’s season was highlighted by a pair of wins over MICDS (Mo.) and a victory over DeSmet Jesuit (Mo.). Nelson Gaechter finished the season with 58 goals. Previous: 4

    5. East Grand Rapids (Mich.), 19-1 

    The Pioneers won the Michigan Division II state title with an 11-9 victory over Forest Hills Central (Mich.) on June 10. The title was East Grand Rapids’ first since 2009. Hub Hejna (Colorado College) scored an astounding 93 goals and 66 assists this season. Previous: 5

    6. MICDS (Mo.), 17-5

    The Rams won their fourth straight state title on May 27, beating Chaminade Prep (Mo.) in the final. All five of MICDS’ losses this season were decided by three goals or less, including an overtime decision against Brother Rice (Mich.) and two games against New Trier (Ill.). Harry Wellford (Virginia) finished his time at MICDS with 163 goals and 125 assists. Previous: 6

    7. Archbishop Moeller (Ohio), 17-7

    The Crusaders won their last 10 games of the season en route to Ohio’s Division I state title, defeating Cleveland St. Ignatius (Ohio) 9-8 in double overtime in the final June 3. Moeller’s season was highlighted by a win over Ohio powerhouse Upper Arlington in the state semifinals, as well as a win over St. Xavier (Ohio) in the regional finals. Previous: 7

    8. Loyola Academy (Ill.), 17-8

    The Ramblers could not defend their 2016 state title, falling to New Trier (Ill.) 9-6 in the championship game June 3. Loyola played arguably the toughest schedule in the region, but had most of its success in-state, defeating teams such as New Trier (Ill.) and Grayslake North (Ill.) during the regular season. Previous: 8 

    9. Upper Arlington (Ohio), 20-3

    The Golden Bears’ impressive season ended in the state semifinals against Moeller on May 31, as they couldn’t avenge a regular-season loss to the Crusaders. The only other team to beat Upper Arlington this season was Dublin Coffman (Ohio). Jack Dolan led Upper Arlington’s attack with 53 goals. Previous: 9

    10. Detroit Catholic Central (Mich.), 15-6

    The Shamrocks nearly ended Brother Rice’s run as Michigan state champs, but wound up short in an 8-7 contest on June 10 in the title game. Detroit Catholic Central had victories over New Trier (Ill.) and one-loss Hartland (Mich.). Previous: 10

    — Justin Boggs

    West Top 10 (season complete)

    1. St. Ignatius Prep (Calif.), 19-2

    The Wildcats beat Bellarmine Prep 9-4 to claim their eighth straight West Catholic Athletic League (WCAL) title and wrap up another impressive season. Ignatius, which is ranked in the top 10 nationally, hasn’t lost a league game in eight years of play. Previous: 1

    2. Cherry Creek (Colo.), 18-1

    A year after failing to make the state final for the first time since 2011, the Bruins made the most of their return to collect their record sixth title with a 17-8 win over defending champion Regis Jesuit (Colo.) in the Class 5A championship. Cherry Creek beat Kent Denver (Colo.) 13-5 in the semifinals to set up the third championship meeting in the last four years with Regis. Previous: 2

    3. La Costa Canyon (Calif.), 18-2

    The second-seeded Mavericks claimed their eighth CIF championship overall and third in four years by outlasting Coronado (Calif.) 10-9 in the San Diego Section Open final. They ended a one-year title drought after topping Poway 11-8 in the semifinals. Previous: 3

    4. Regis Jesuit (Colo.), 15-4

    The Raiders topped 2016 state runner-up Arapahoe (Colo.) 15-7 in the Class 5A semifinals but couldn’t repeat an early-season win over Cherry Creek in the final. Regis fell behind 5-1 in the first quarter and trailed 9-2 at the half. Previous: 4

    5. Loyola-Los Angeles (Calif.), 21-4

    The Cubs claimed their second straight Southern Section CIF title, avenging a regular-season loss to Palos Verdes (Calif.) in the Los Angeles final and topping Foothill-Santa Ana (Calif.) 13-5 in the overall championship. Loyola’s other three losses were against teams that have been ranked this season. Previous: 5

    6. De La Salle (Calif.), 19-4

    The Spartans claimed the CIF North Coast Division 1 title, beating Amador Valley (Calif.) 7-5 in the final to avenge an early-season loss to the Dons. Three of their four losses were decided by two goals or less, including one against nationally-ranked St. Ignatius Prep. De La Salle beat knocked defending champion Monte Vista-Danville (Calif.) out in the semifinals, 8-6. Previous: 7

    7. Arapahoe (Colo.), 13-5

    The Warriors won 12 of their last 14 games after a 1-3 start to the season but ended their season with a second loss to Regis Jesuit in the Class 5A state semifinals. Arapahoe led 5-4 at halftime but was outscored 11-2 in the second half of the 15-7 loss. Previous: 8

    8. Oregon Episcopal (Ore.), 17-1

    The Aardvarks avenged their lone loss of the season by beating previously-ranked West Linn (Ore.) 11-10 in overtime of the state semifinals May 31, then went on to win the title Saturday with a 9-6 win over Sunset. They held a 4-3 advantage at the half but fired off four goals in the third quarter to propel themselves to the win. Previous: NR

    9. Skyline (Wash.), 16-2

    The Spartans claimed the WHSBLA Class 4A state title with a 9-7 win over rival Eastlake (Wash.) in the final after topping Woodinville (Wash.) 9-6 in the semifinals. Skyline had one in-state loss this season, a two-goal loss to Bellevue (Wash.) in the opener. Previous: 9

    10. Coronado (Calif.), 15-7

    The Islanders rallied back from an 8-4 deficit against La Costa Canyon to take a 9-8 lead with 4:29 left but couldn’t hold on and settled for runner-up in the San Diego Open division. It was their second one-goal loss to LCC. Coronado upset previously-ranked Torrey Pines (Calif.) 6-4 in the semifinals, less than two weeks after dropping a 19-7 loss to the Falcons. Previous: 10

    — Laurel Pfahler

    Short Summary: 
    Seasons ended in the Northeast and Midwest, highlighted by Lincoln-Sudbury (Mass.) winning a state title.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photographer Main Image: 
    PHOTO BY JOSEPH PREZIOSO/BOSTON HERALD
    Photographer Parallax: 
    PHOTO BY KEVIN P. TUCKER
    Photo Main Caption: 
    With a 8-7 win over Boston College High (Mass.) in the state championship game, Lincoln-Sudbury (Mass.) claimed its third straight state title.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    Culver Prep Academy (Ind.) finishes on top in the Midwest after winning the Inter-Ac Invitational in Philadelphia.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine