distinctive sounds LLC

101 mexico lane
mahopac, new york 10541

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 08, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4384757

County
PUTNAM

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - DISTINCTIVE SOUNDS LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • 3 critical challenges your business incubator should solve
    By Kyle Ellicott - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    To develop an idea into a business, incubation seems to be the new industry “normal.” There are thousands of incubators worldwide and each year that number is continuing to grow. There are private, public and corporate incubators, many with a distinct focus on local economies, global, communities, or a specific vertical.At this point, it sounds like variations of ice cream. Over 9,000 flavors, all around the world. If there’s incubation happening, it’s because there is a demand from companies, and because the companies that incubate probably accelerate beyond their...Read More

    Source: ReadWriteWeb
  • The Beeping, Gargling History of Gaming’s Most Iconic Sounds
    By Charley Locke - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    Want to replicate the sound of face-punching? Hit a frozen turkey.

    Source: Webmonkey
  • Rooted in Counterculture, Whole Foods’ Founder Finds an Unlikely Refuge
    By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    John Mackey wanted to fight off the activist investors attacking Whole Foods. He found a savior in Amazon, a company blamed for laying waste to retailers.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Don’t make it harder to get the attention you deserve
    Thursday Nov 3, 2016

    Even organizations with a well-developed and up-to-date brand sometimes overlook one essential element of a strong communications strategy: brand architecture.

    Brand architecture is the name we give to the complicated network of roles and relationships between your organization’s programs, initiatives, events, publications, spaces—all the things that you do, own, and are known for. You might refer to them as “brands” or “sub-brands.” Perhaps you don’t think of them as distinct entities with identities of their own. But your audiences often do.

    Most nonprofits have grown their brand architecture  in an ad hoc way—a clever event name here, an interesting icon there, a legacy group maintained from a merger. It may all seem like small stuff, but eventually it adds up to a big problem: a brand that lacks a coherent, purposeful narrative and fails to make a powerful and focused impression.

    Evidence of brand architecture problems pops up in the conversations you have with your team every day.

    “Should we put our logo on our Walk t-shirts?”

    When you have clear and purposefully maintained brand architecture, questions like this won’t be up for debate. If your event is closely branded with the overall organization, the logo will be thoughtfully incorporated into the visual standards you’ve established. If the event has a completely separate brand designed to reach a completely separate audience, the main organization logo won’t be appropriate—and everyone will be clear about that ahead of time.

    Either way, clear brand architecture saves you time, spares you headaches, AND ensures that the choices you’re making on the ground reflect a smart strategy. Win-win-win.

    “We need a separate website for this program.”

    Setting up lots of unique websites is usually a sign that your team has a tendency to think and communicate in siloes. When you maintain separate sites for each program or event, you give each one a distinct identity—and discourage people from seeing your work as many parts making up a coherent whole. You’ll have to work even harder to help them see the other great work you do and feel inspired support your organization overall.

    [Side note: this issue could also be a sign that it’s time to redo your website.]

    “Our gala is coming up in a few months: time to start thinking about a logo.”

    Sound the alarm! If your team is in the habit of making logos and coming up with names for lots of events or programs or initiatives, odds are good that you’re creating unnecessary confusion and weakening your overall brand impression.

    That’s not to say that you can’t have special treatments for certain programs or a distinct look and feel for your big event—but it’s important to be strategic about it. Well-developed brand architecture strategy usually includes clear criteria for when it’s appropriate to stretch your brand and how far (e.g., a customized name or theme might be okay—but not a separate logo).

    When you allow key programs to take on lives (and messages and audiences) of their own without thoughtfully connecting them to your organization’s overall brand, you’re missing an opportunity—and you’re making it all too easy to stay lost in the shuffle of great causes. Strategic brands with clear hierarchy, a consistent look, and a unified message have a leg up in a messy and inconsistent world.

    Any of these challenges sound familiar? If so, it might be time to step back and consider whether you have a problem with your brand architecture (it happens to the best of us—check out this helpful piece by fellow Duck Ally Dommu on some of the causes of brand architecture issues).

    On November 11, Sarah Durham, Big Duck's CEO, and Debi Goldberg, The Union for Reform Judaism's Director of Communications, will be speaking about brand architecture and sharing an in depth case study with tips. Details are online here, or just let us know if you can't make it and we'll share the resources.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Rushmore, Idle Less
    Monday Mar 13, 2017

    AUSTIN, TEXAS -- The thing about SXSW is, it's eclectic. Pay no mind to the stereotype of bearded hipsters stumbling around actual reality trying to pioneer enhanced reality. On Saturday, I ran intoso many other distinct characters pursuing distinct endeavors.

    Source: Media Post: Garfield at Large
  • The Power of Brand Personality for Your Nonprofit
    Tuesday Feb 28, 2017

    We all have distinct personalities—some of us are outgoing and whimsical, while others are nerdy and creative. Your nonprofit is no different. We believe that defining and using your organization’s brand personality can be a useful communications tool. In fact, your personality, when coupled with your positioning (the big idea you hope others might associate with your organization), is the heart of your brand strategy and the key to defining or refining your brand identity and experience.

    First things first, what is brand personality? Brand personality is the tone and style you use to guide your communications. It is a set of adjectives that describe the overarching feelings you want your community to associate with your organization. Think about the most recent Target commercial you’ve seen and how it made you feel. You might describe the retail brand as fun, lovable, pleasant, and charming, and that’s brand personality in action.

    Elements of your personality should come through in the tone and style of all of your communications. Writing a blog post? Designing a brochure? Check out the adjectives that make up your brand personality and decide if the communications look, feel, and sound true to your personality.

    An effective brand personality will help your nonprofit distinguish itself from its peers because it’s a list of characteristics that are only true to you. Used consistently, personality will become a core part of your brand, and audiences will immediately associate certain feelings with your work.

    Not sure where to start? Imagine you were asking a board members to set your organization up on a blind date with their close friend, a generous potential donor. How would you want that board member to describe you to their friend? Sure, you hope they’d reference your mission or elevator pitch, but what adjectives would you want them to use to get that donor excited to meet you? Everyone would like a nice, professional, and credible organization, but what’s so special about you that someone couldn’t wait to meet you for dinner (or go to your next gala)?

    I want to help you discover and apply your brand personality to your nonprofit. Join me on March 21 at this free 90-minute workshop, Fish or fowl? Establishing your nonprofit's brand personality, at The Foundation Center in Washington, DC. We’ll talk about brand personality, look at some examples, and walk through exercises to help you determine the characteristics that describe your nonprofit on its best day.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Critic's Notebook: Foreign Horror TV Shows Are Light on Monsters, Heavy on Mood
    By MIKE HALE - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    On the streaming service Shudder, foreign series like “Jordskott” and “Penance” offer a classic psychological dread that’s in short supply on American TV.

    Source: NYT > Home Page