design development li LLC

64 south ocean avenue
bayport, new york 11705

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 10, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4401460

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - DESIGN DEVELOPMENT LI LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • Your #GivingTuesday To-Do List
    Wednesday Nov 2, 2016

    #GivingTuesday is less than one month away! [That’s Tuesday, November 29th, in case you missed it!] I’m already getting emails and tweets reminding me to “save the date”... are you ready?

    Earlier this week, Daniel and I shared some tips for how to maximize #GivingTuesday with the finalists of the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s Spark Prize, who will each receive a match of up to $5,000 for their donations. This is part of their new local giving campaign, Brooklyn Gives, created to encourage Brooklyn residents and small businesses to come together to support some of Brooklyn’s most outstanding community-based nonprofits.

    As part of the training, we offered a week-by-week list of how to plan #GivingTuesday. So if you still haven’t started your preparations, don’t fret. There’s still time and lots of hope!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Annual reports: worth it?
    Tuesday Nov 22, 2016

    In 2010, I attempted to persuade nonprofits to stop producing costly annual reports in a blog called “The Annual Report is Dead: Long live the Annual Report!”. Years later, I still get calls from nonprofit leaders who continue to feel pressure to produce annual reports even though they can  drain resources and have limited or unclear return on investment (ROI).

    Why I am skeptical about annual reports

    Yes, it’s a best practice to publish your audited financials, and many charity watchdogs encourage or even mandate it. But that can be as simple as embedding a PDF on your website--just a few pages straight from your audit, with little fanfare and no design. So why produce something fancier?

    For most nonprofit organizations, a well-written, well-designed annual report is a way to acknowledge and showcase progress to donors. Some reports provide insight into what’s to come in the year(s) ahead.  But to produce a good report, costs can be high: most of the mid-size or larger organizations regularly spend 5- or 6-figures on their annual report—not to mention copious hours devoted by staff to gather stories, collect photos, and get approvals. Couldn’t these resources be better invested?

    That’s way too much time and money to spend on a document with a limited shelf-life unless you’re certain it’s really working, in my opinion.

    Try this approach instead

    Before you produce your next annual report, schedule a meeting with the staff who are most likely to use it. That’s probably your CEO, COO, and development team-- especially the major gifts officers. It might even be your board chair and/or members of your development committee.

    Here are four questions you might use to spark a productive conversation:

    • Are we all on the same page about what we hope the annual report will do for our organization? (probe: Do we agree it’s a major donor cultivation tool? A stewardship tool? A sexy coffee table credibility piece? A place to list donors so they feel acknowledged?) ?
    • Besides mailing or emailing, how do you personally use the annual report in your work? (Probe: Is it used to facilitate meetings? Big asks with major donors? Look up past work? As a way to keep in touch with prospects?)?
    • What specific feedback have you received about past reports? (Probe: Do people actually read it? Does it inspire the types of reactions and results we’d like-- like increased donor retention?) ?
    • Is there a less expensive or easier way we might get the same or even better results? (Brainstorm: Could you post a short video on your website, perhaps-- or produce something with a longer shelf-life with inserts? Should you focus on more frequent, shorter updates to donors vs. investing deeply one annual report?) ?

    If you must produce an annual report

    Personally, I’d rather see you invest tens of thousands of dollars on building the capacity of staff people, or on longer-shelf-life, higher value types of communications, wouldn’t you? So if you feel you must produce an annual report, consider dialing it back this year. Here are a few ways to do that:

    • Keep it short and sweet. Financials plus a letter from your CEO, referencing high-level accomplishments and/or linking to your website, which can be updated in real time. ?
    • Go digital. Maybe just an email with PDF financials this year? ?
    • Create a container. A nicely designed pocket folder you can customize with inserts might give you better flexibility and a longer shelf-life. ?
    • Consider a bi-annual report. If a fancy print piece still feels essential, consider moving to an every other year “progress report” to extend the shelf-life and reduce your time/money investment. ?
    • Start tracking the ROI. My friend Kivi has some helpful suggestions on how you can measure the success of your annual report.?

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Disney Slapped With Lawsuit Over ‘Guardians of the Galaxy,’ ‘Avengers: Age of Ultron’ Effects
    By Tim Kenneally, provided by
    - Monday Jul 17, 2017

    Visual effects firm says that Disney contracted with people who stole the technologyThe company was slapped with a lawsuit on Monday by a visual effects company, which claims that its technology was misappropriated for “Beauty and the Beast,” “Guardians of the Galaxy” and Avengers:“[I]n all of the film industry and media accolades about the record-breaking success of ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ and the acclaimed cutting-edge digital MOVA Contour technology that made the film’s success possible, nowhere is it mentioned that the patented and copyright-protected MOVA Contour technology was stolen from its inventor and developer, Rearden LLC, and its owner Rearden Mova LLC,” the suit reads.Nowhere is it mentioned that although Disney had previously contracted with Rearden LLC and its controlled entities on four previous major motion pictures to use MOVA Contour and knew of a Rearden Demand Letter to one of the thieves demanding immediate return of the stolen MOVA Contour system, Disney nonetheless contracted with the thieves to use the stolen MOVA Contour system.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • Rapper Common surprises students at NY school, donates money
    By MESFIN FEKADU, AP Music Writer - Thursday Jul 20, 2017

    Rapper Common surprises students at NY school, donates moneyNEW YORK (AP) — Oscar and Grammy winner Common surprised a group of New York students by donating $10,000 to help their teachers buy supplies like calculators and science kits.The rapper-actor partnered with the nonprofit AdoptAClassroom.org and Burlington Stores to give Renaissance School of the Arts in Harlem the funds on Thursday.Jadon-Li M. Antoine, an aspiring musician, actor and dancer, said Common's visit motivates him to keep aiming for his dreams.Burlington has been raising money from its 599 stores to help other schools, asking customers to donate $1 or more.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • A Winning Design for a New York Monument to Gay and Transgender People
    By JOSHUA BARONE - Sunday Jun 25, 2017

    Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that the artist Anthony Goicolea had been selected to design the monument in Hudson River Park in Manhattan.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
design development li llc bayport ny