daybreak communications limited liability company

202-08 48 avenue
oakland gardens, new york 11364

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
FEBRUARY 03, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4523222

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - DAYBREAK COMMUNICATIONS LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Communications Directors, Step Up and Lead
    By Kivi Leroux Miller - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    Just about every week, I talk to nonprofit communications directors who have “limiting beliefs” that are holding them back.  Limiting beliefs are ideas or assumptions that you have about yourself, your situation, or others that limit your ability to succeed. But limiting beliefs are just that: beliefs. They are not indisputable facts, and they are […]

    Source: Kivi's Nonprofit Communications Blog
  • Choosing Garden Gloves: Selecting The Best Gloves For Gardening
    By Darcy Larum - Sunday Jun 4, 2017

    Source: Gardening Know How
  • Supreme Court Further Limits Plaintiffs' Venue Shopping
    Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The Supreme Court dealt a blow to consumer plaintiffs by limiting where lawsuits against companies with business in multiple states can be heard.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: U.S. Business
  • 7 Reasons Why This Gen X Nonprofit Marketer Has Fallen In Love With Slack
    By Kerri Karvetski, Online Campaigns and Social Media Adviser - Thursday Jun 15, 2017

    As an independent marketing and communications consultant, I work with a wide variety of clients, from nonprofits of all sizes, to agencies, to training companies. Lately, when we begin working together, figuring out how we’ll communicate and manage communications and projects, I inquire, “Do you email? Or Slack.” I’ve used Basecamp, Asana and Trello. Skype […]

    Source: Kivi's Nonprofit Communications Blog
  • EU Proposes Enforcing Data Encryption and Banning Backdoors
    By Tim Hardwick - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The European Parliament's Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice, and Home Affairs has published draft proposals that would enforce end-to-end encryption on all digital communications and forbid backdoors that enable law enforcement to access private message data.

    The proposed amendment relates to Article 7 of the EU's Charter of Fundamental Rights, which says that EU citizens have a right to personal privacy, as well as privacy in their family life and at home. By extension, the "confidentiality and safety" of EU citizens' electronic communications needs to be "guaranteed" in the same manner.

    Confidentiality of electronic communications ensures that information exchanged between parties and the external elements of such communication, including when the information has been sent, from where, to whom, is not to be revealed to anyone other than to the parties involved in a communication.

    The principle of confidentiality should apply to current and future means of communication, including calls, internet access, instant messaging applications, e-mail, internet phone calls and messaging provided through social media.
    The regulation states that the disclosure of contents in electronic communications may reveal highly sensitive information about citizens, from personal experiences and emotions to medical conditions, sexual preferences and political views, which could result in personal and social harm, economic loss or embarrassment.

    In addition, the committee argues that not only the content of communications needs to be protected, but also the metadata associated with it, including numbers called, websites visited, geographical location, and the time, date, and duration of calls, which might otherwise be used to draw conclusions about the private lives of persons involved.

    The regulations would apply to providers of electronic communication services as well as software providers that enable electronic communications and the retrieval of information on the internet. However, the amendment goes further by stating that the use of software backdoors by EU member states should be outlawed.
    When encryption of electronic communications data is used, decryption, reverse engineering or monitoring of such communications shall be prohibited.  

    Member states shall not impose any obligations on electronic communications service providers that would result in the weakening of the security and encryption of their networks and services.
    The proposals appear to have been tabled in response to comments made by EU member states such as the U.K., which has argued that encrypted online channels such as WhatsApp and Telegram provide a "safe haven" for terrorists because governments governments and even the companies that host the services cannot read them.

    The U.K. home secretary Amber Rudd recently claimed that it is "completely unacceptable" that authorities cannot gain access to messages stored on mobile applications protected by end-to-end encryption. A leaked draft technical paper prepared by the U.K. government was leaked shortly after Rudd's comments, containing proposals related to the removal of encryption from private communications.

    The EU proposals could also put European security policy at odds with federal legislators in the U.S., who recently called on technology companies to compromise the encryption built into their mobile software. Last year, Apple and the FBI were involved in a public dispute over the latter's demands to provide a backdoor into iPhones, following the December 2015 shooter incidents in San Bernardino.

    Apple said the software the FBI asked for could serve as a "master key" able to be used to get information from any iPhone or iPad - including its most recent devices - while the FBI claimed it only wanted access to a single iPhone.

    The European Union proposals have to be approved by MEPs and reviewed by the EU council before the amendments can pass. It remains unclear how the laws would apply in the U.K. after Brexit, initial negotiations for which begin on Monday. 

    Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Low Chill Hour Apples – Tips On Growing Zone 8 Apple Trees
    By Liz Baessler - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    Source: Gardening Know How
  • Charter Urges Judge To Throw Out NY's Suit Over Slow Web Connections
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Cable company Charter is asking a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who alleges that the company duped consumers by delivering slower-than-advertised broadbandspeeds.

    Source: Media Post: Television News Daily
  • Why Did China Detain Anbang’s Chairman? He Tested a Lot of Limits
    By KEITH BRADSHER and SUI-LEE WEE - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    Wu Xiaohui often skirted the mostly unwritten rules on what Chinese companies are allowed to do, from big deals to an effort to court President Trump’s son-in-law.

    Source: NYT > Home Page