custom craftsman general contracting LLC

58 carpenter avenue
lunbrook, new york 11563

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 31, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4353897

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - CUSTOM CRAFTSMAN GENERAL CONTRACTING LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • How Real Is Uber’s “Be Your Own Boss” Tagline?
    By Cyndi Suarez - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    Uber is built on contract workers who are invited to “be their own bosses,” but the company has sophisticated control practices supported by data and a general practice of disengagement.

    The post How Real Is Uber’s “Be Your Own Boss” Tagline? appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • Charter Urges Judge To Throw Out NY's Suit Over Slow Web Connections
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Cable company Charter is asking a judge to dismiss a lawsuit by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who alleges that the company duped consumers by delivering slower-than-advertised broadbandspeeds.

    Source: Media Post: Television News Daily
  • Charter promised more broadband but didn’t deliver, now must pay fine
    By Jon Brodkin - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    21,000 NY customers did not get broadband on schedule, despite merger promise.

    Source: Ars Technica
  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Qualcomm Says Its Innovations Are At the Heart of Every iPhone as Battle With Apple Intensifies
    By Joe Rossignol - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Apple this week expanded its lawsuit against Qualcomm, accusing the wireless chipmaker of "double-dipping" by allegedly refusing to sell chips to manufacturers unless they also pay separate royalties and enter licensing agreements at unreasonable rates, according to court documents filed electronically.


    Qualcomm has since responded to the amended complaint, claiming that Apple is "trying to distract" from the fact that it has made alleged "misleading statements" about the comparative performance of its Snapdragon X12 modem, used in select iPhone 7 models to enable Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity.

    Apple dual sources wireless chips from Qualcomm and Intel for the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. Qualcomm's Snapdragon X12 modem is used in CDMA models, such as those sold by Verizon and Sprint, while Intel's XMM7360 modem is used in GSM models, such as those sold by AT&T and T-Mobile.

    New York-based Cellular Insights last year found Qualcomm's modem to significantly outperform Intel's modem in the iPhone 7 Plus, based on simulated testing of LTE performance at different distances from a cellular tower.

    Apple, however, publicly stated there is "no discernible difference" in performance between the Qualcomm and Intel modems in any of the models. Apple also threatened Qualcomm not to disclose the truth, according to Don Rosenberg, executive vice president and general counsel of Qualcomm.

    Rosenberg said Apple's bigger misconception is that Qualcomm's innovations are limited to technology implemented in the cellular modem, when in fact its patented inventions are supposedly "at the heart of every iPhone" and "enable the most important uses and features" of those devices.

    An excerpt from Qualcomm's statement obtained by MacRumors:

    Apple says Qualcomm's innovations are limited to technology implemented in the cellular modem, when Apple knows well that Qualcomm has been the de facto R&D arm of the industry.

    Qualcomm's patented inventions make possible not only connectivity and high-speed data transmission across mobile networks, but also high-precision GPS navigation, app store operations, power management and battery efficiency, mobile video including advanced compression, graphics, camera imaging and facial-recognition technology, audio quality and audio file compression, and much, much more.

    Qualcomm's innovations are at the heart of every iPhone and enable the most important uses and features of those devices. It simply is untrue that Qualcomm is seeking to collect royalties for Apple innovations that have nothing to do with Qualcomm's technology.
    Rosenberg added that Apple is "rarely first to market with any new technology, which shows it is relying heavily on the R&D investments in the most revolutionary technologies by companies like Qualcomm."

    Apple argued that Qualcomm has been unfairly "levying its own tax" on the iPhone's innovations by charging royalties on a percentage of the entire smartphone's value, despite supplying just a single component of the device.

    An excerpt from Apple's amended complaint:
    As Apple innovates, Qualcomm demands more. Qualcomm had nothing to do with creating the revolutionary Touch ID, the world’s most popular camera, or the Retina display Apple’s customers love, yet Qualcomm wants to be paid as if these (and future) breakthroughs belong to it.
    Qualcomm said the per-device royalty that it charges Apple's contract manufacturers for the right to use its licensed technologies in the iPhone is "less than what Apple charges for a single wall plug." The only first-party wall plug that Apple sells is a 5W USB Power Adapter for $19 in the United States.

    Apple sued Qualcomm in January for $1 billion in alleged unpaid royalty rebates. Qualcomm countersued Apple for breach of contract, encouraging regulatory attacks on its business, and failing to engage in "good faith negotiations" for a license to its wireless patents on fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms.

    Qualcomm was the exclusive supplier of 3G and LTE modems for iPhones until last year, when Apple began dual sourcing from Intel.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • To Stave Off a Deportation, Cuomo Pardons a 9/11 Volunteer
    By SARAH MASLIN NIR - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    The governor expunged the crime of a 9/11 volunteer and undocumented immigrant facing removal by the immigration authorities because of a decades-old conviction.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Rooted in Counterculture, Whole Foods’ Founder Finds an Unlikely Refuge
    By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    John Mackey wanted to fight off the activist investors attacking Whole Foods. He found a savior in Amazon, a company blamed for laying waste to retailers.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Moneyball And Media
    Thursday Oct 13, 2011

    Whether or not you’ve seen the "Moneyball” movie or read Michael Lewis’ terrific book, you surely know the basic premise: a small-budget team beats the big boys by analyzing thedata that really matters, rather than relying on the established stats the others continue to use.  Billy Beane, Paul DePodesta and others used new measures like Wins Above Replacement and OPS tofind price/value players and win more games than the pundits expected from low-spending teams.  Beane and his upstart protégés effectively applied Apple’s “ThinkDifferent” maxim and shook up a sedentary world.

    A growing number of smart marketers are applying the same Moneyball principles to their customer acquisition media spending. Moneyball’s gurus boiled baseball down to Runs Created -- that is, if you score more runs than the other team, you win.  And when you win more games, you gain “market share,”rising in the standings.  It’s just as simple in marketing -- essentially substituting Sales Created for Runs Created.  Use the right tools to analyze your spending and you’llfind the combination that will result in more business and more market share for less.

    This is where performance marketing comes in.  Instead of acronyms like OPS, we have eCPM, eCPA andeCPL.  We even have MVP.  Ignore these measures and you might virtually sign an overweight, over-the-hill pitcher to a long, expensive contract. 

    Channel your inner stats geekfor a moment and let’s examine these measures.

    What is eCPM?  It’s a bottom-up measure that shows what your media spending is really worth.  The calculation starts withperformance programs, where you pay for results only, generally on a Cost per Lead (CPL) basis.  Effective CPM is figured by dividing the amount you’re willing to pay for a qualified leadby the ad impressions. As an example, let’s say you run a dedicated email to 100,000 and yield 125 qualified leads, paying $20 per lead.  The total spending is $2,500.  Andthat’s an eCPM of $25. Why is that measure important?  It sets a standard for what you should be willing to pay that list owner on a straight CPM basis. 

    This kind of bottom upthinking leads to fair pricing for direct-focused media – it can be considered a base price in negotiations.  And there’s always an argument that branding value adds to that base CPM,it’s certainly valid to add a set dollar amount to the eCPM.

    How about eCPA?  Same basic concept, but now we look at the real bottom-line results: how many of the leads turned intoactual sales?  And how much revenue did the average sale generate?  How many “runs” did the media create?  This can be harder to calculate because the data may not be aseasy to get.  But it is getting better: There are end-to-end systems now that make it simpler to link the source of sales to the original media action.  The flip side is eCPL, where you canexamine how paid (CPM) media converts into prospects.  This is simply fixed media cost over number of leads or actions generated.

    Let’s not forget MVP.  In the performanceworld, an MVP is a Most Valuable Prospect -- that one-in-a-thousand prospect who should make you jump through hoops when she raises her hand. 

    When dealing in the realm of eCPM, keep theMVP in mind -- simply because not all leads are equal.  If you set a value for a qualified prospect, certain prospects should be worth more, because they can be heavy users or high marginplayers.  Qualified prospects  at the top of your screening criteria are the “free agents” who should give you the best return on your nurturing cost -- even if you spend morethan average to acquire them.  A Moneyball approach overweights the factors you care about, and may ignore factors your industry generally seeks.

    What about media relationships? Using these metrics helps identify media that might not be considered otherwise, just like Beane’s Oakland As traded for players nobody else seemed to want.  The metrics also helprationalize pricing and potentially build longer-term relations with the media you currently use.  In either case, the medium gets an opportunity to prove itself.  And you both get to agreeon a formula for a fair price.

    Want to win the game unfairly?  Take a swing at some of these new ways to pitch data.

    Source: Media Post: Performance Insider