craft spirits & wine, LLC

666 old country road
suite 701
garden city, new york 11530

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 09, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4443448

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - CRAFT SPIRITS & WINE, LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • San Francisco’s Anchor Brewing acquired by Sapporo
    By Alyssa Pereira - Thursday Aug 3, 2017

    Anchor Brewing, San Francisco’s beloved 121-year-old brewery and creator of the city’s most famous beer, is being sold to Japan’s Sapporo Holdings Ltd. in a landmark deal. According to Keith Greggor, Anchor’s president and CEO, the move was a year in the making and the result of speaking with “many, many” larger breweries all over the world to find the right fit. Anchor Brewing Co. is considered the leading pioneer of the craft beer movement, and is credited with reviving and modernizing some of today's most popular American beer styles. Anchor Distilling, which produces spirits such as Junipero Gin and Old Potrero whiskey, is not involved in the deal and will become a separate company. The news comes as the latest in a line of high-profile craft breweries purchased by larger beverage companies, following in the footsteps of Heineken’s acquisition of Lagunitas, Constellation’s 2015 takeover of Ballast Point, and AB InBev’s purchases of Goose Island and Wicked Weed, among many others. Yet Anchor representatives said its beer would continue to be brewed at its Potrero Hill headquarters, and there would be no changes to its beer recipes. Of all the people we spoke to, (Sapporo) respected Anchor the most, what it stood for and the importance of its connection with San Francisco. [...] by 1965, Anchor was in dire shape and on the verge of bankruptcy when Fritz Maytag, working off a tip from an Old Spaghetti Factory bartender, bought the capsizing company for a few thousand bucks. In subsequent years, he added four beers to Anchor’s repertoire that no one else in America was making: the dry-hopped Liberty Ale, a dark porter (Anchor Porter), a barley wine (Old Foghorn Barleywine Ale) and, in a tradition that continues today, the first Anchor Christmas Ale. Yet Anchor’s new move signals a direction that is not so much trailblazing as it is increasingly conventional. In a statement, Masaki Oga, Sapporo Holdings’ president and representative director, likened the lengthy histories of the two breweries, noting that Anchor has inspired a “new generation of brewers and beer lovers around the world.” [...] the deal also likely means that Anchor’s long-delayed Pier 48 expansion is more likely to be dead in the water, though Anchor would not comment on the status of the project. When asked whether this deal jeopardizes Anchor’s “craft” designation, a commonly accepted definition dictated by the Brewers Association, the brewery’s executives did not seem concerned about that imminent debate, due to the brewery’s long history.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Food & Dining
  • Effete Home Alabama: 'Food & Wine' Heads South
    Monday Jun 26, 2017

    'Food & Wine,' the standard-bearer for fancy eats ever since the demise of Gourmet in 2009, is leaving New York City for new digs in Birmingham, Alabama. It will join sister food and lifestyle TimeInc. titles: 'Cooking Light,' 'Southern Living' and 'Coastal Living.'

    Source: Media Post: Email Marketing Daily
  • Nearly 2 tons of seized ivory to be crushed in Central Park
    By MARY ESCH, Associated Press - Thursday Aug 3, 2017

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Nearly two tons of trinkets, statues and jewelry crafted from the tusks of at least 100 slaughtered elephants are heading for a rock crusher in New York City's Central Park to demonstrate the state's commitment to smashing the illegal ivory trade.[...] state environmental officials, who are partnering with the Wildlife Conservation Society and Tiffany & Co. for Thursday's "Ivory Crush," say no price justifies slaughtering elephants for their tusks.Last year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service instituted a near-total ban on the domestic commercial ivory trade and barred sales across state lines.Since August 2014, New York law has prohibited the sale, purchase, trade or distribution of anything made from elephant or mammoth ivory or rhinoceros horn, except in limited situations with state approval.The World Wildlife Fund says the illegal wildlife trade not only threatens animal populations, but also endangers national security by funding terrorist cells.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Finding renewal in New Zealand’s birthplace
    By Jill K. Robinson - Friday Jul 21, 2017

    Anywhere else, I’d have my eyes firmly fixed on the trail ahead, wary for snakes or dangerous critters. [...] my head is angled up into the green canopy, where shafts of the day’s last minutes of sunlight create a kaleidoscope effect — a swirl of emerald, azure and gold. The cultural history in this distinctive and beautiful region at the far northern edge of the North Island — from the kauri forests to the Waitangi Treaty Grounds, from the colonial buildings and whaling history in Russell to the spot that separates the Pacific Ocean from the Tasman Sea where Maori spirits are believed to leap to the water to return to their ancestral homeland of Hawaiki — offers a deeper understanding of its complex past. History and legend are bountiful in the rural Northland, and the region sometimes goes by the nickname Te Hiku o Te Ika, “the tail of the fish,” referring to the legend that New Zealand was fished from the sea by the demigod Maui. The colossal beings that surround us in the forest reach their branches like outstretched arms into the space above my head, as if they’re welcoming us to their domain. Early Maori migrations settled throughout the Northland, including the subtropical Bay of Islands, with its turquoise water and nearly 150 islands that today lure those on holiday. [...] the village quickly became a magnet for rough elements during the height of the whaling industry, and grog shops and brothels did a roaring trade when sailors were on shore leave, earning the town the nickname “the hellhole of the Pacific.” On the outdoor patio of the Duke of Marlborough Hotel (which began life in 1827 as Johnny Johnston’s Grog Shop), families lunch on fish and chips while kids pedal along the Strand on bicycles, weaving in and out of meandering vacationers. Not far from Russell is Waitangi, the site of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 between the British Crown and more than 500 Maori chiefs, establishing New Zealand as a British colony. At the newly opened Museum of Waitangi, I wander among the artifacts in the permanent exhibition, but am drawn back to the interactive display of New Zealand’s founding document, which was written and translated in less than a week. Next to me, a teenager proudly points to where his ancestor signed the treaty, his family crowded around the display, poking fingers at the digital copy of the historic document. Outside, across the Treaty Grounds with panoramic views of the Bay of Islands, visitors hang out between the Treaty House and carved meeting house, awaiting a cultural performance. After death, all Maori spirits travel up the coast and over this windswept vista of the most northwestern corner of the country, down the roots of the lone pohutukawa tree at Te Rerenga Wairua, into the sea and to Manawatawhi (“last breath”) in the Three Kings Islands. Walking around the lighthouse and the crowd of visitors posing at the signpost that proclaims the distances to Tokyo, Sydney, Vancouver, Los Angeles, London and the South Pole, I scan the bluffs to find the lone pohutukawa tree. If I were a Maori spirit, I’d want to travel here, too — among the shades of aqua ocean currents and whistling wind at the grassy, green end of the world. A straight line cutting along the west coast of Northland and flanking the Aupouri Forest, 90-Mile Beach (which is only 55 miles) is known for spectacular sunsets, a great left-hand surf break and towering sand dunes. Don’t bring your rental car along on a tour of 90-Mile Beach, because rental companies won’t allow their cars on the sand, mostly for safety reasons. Thrill seekers get to try their hand at sand surfing on the Te Paki Sand Dunes. Luxurious Northland home base on the dramatic coastline of Matauri Bay, with rolling farmland and quiet, pristine private beaches. Room rates start at about $1,124 per night, and include daily breakfast, evening cocktails and canapes, and a nightly gourmet dinner. Room rates start at about $124 per night. Another garden spot to enjoy in good weather, this restaurant serves wraps, salads, fish and chips, and wood-fired pizzas — along with local wines and Northland craft beers. At this fine-dining restaurant, pair incredible views of the Bay of Islands with dishes focused on seasonal New Zealand ingredients. On the Twilight Encounter tour, visit the majestic kauri trees of the Waipoua Forest with a Maori guide and learn about the culture’s deep spiritual respect for these ancient giants. New Zealand’s most important historic site is where the country’s founding document, the Treaty of Waitangi, was signed in 1840 — by Maori chiefs and representatives of the British Crown.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
craft spirits amp wine llc garden city ny