clean air car service & parking branch two, LLC

136-20 38th ave , suite 10j
flushing, new york 11354

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 13, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4402569

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - CLEAN AIR CAR SERVICE & PARKING BRANCH TWO, LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The Look: New York City Parks in the Summer: Romance, Games and a Performance for a Dying Tree
    By DANIEL ARNOLD, JOANNA NIKAS and EVE LYONS - Saturday Sep 2, 2017

    Daniel Arnold spent the last two months photographing parks in all five boroughs. The experience showed him “a very different pulse of the city.”

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Four Credit Repair Agencies Accused Of Misleading Customers, Charging Illegal Fees
    By Ashlee Kieler - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    Four different “credit repair” operations have been ordered to pay a total of more than $2 million in penalties for allegedly tricking people into thinking their bad credit could be easily fixed.The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau announced today that it filed complaints and proposed judgments against Prime Credit, LLC, IMC Capital, LLC, Commercial Credit Consultants, and Park View Law, …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Exploring peaceful peaks and rugged beauty of Gangwon
    By Spud Hilton - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    When the tethered log finally strikes the massive bronze bell, it’s as if all other noises on Odaesan Mountain take a breath. Slowly, as the achingly pure tone fades, other sounds return, including the gentle clamor of branches and leaves slapping together in the wind. The sprawling, throbbing metropolis of Seoul — and its symphony of industry, traffic, construction, markets and K-Pop music — dominate perception. The Taebaek Mountains are the thorny, forest-covered spine that runs up the east side of the Korean Peninsula, including well into North Korea. Despite averaging about 3,000 feet (topping out in Gangwon at 5,600 feet) the Taebaek Mountains are home to many of the country’s ski resorts and winter sports parks — which will play a starring role in February when the 2018 Winter Olympics are in Pyeongchang, just down the road from Odaesan National Park. The rest of the year, however, Gangwon is a mix of laid-back mountain and coastal towns — a refuge for urban dwellers seeking a slower pace, and a sightseeing spot for tourists (mostly Korean) planning to wander among the natural wonders. The province, which is about the same land area as New Jersey, has its share of man-made oddities — including a strangely comprehensive museum in Gangneung dedicated to Thomas Edison and the Gramophone — but I’m here to see the original scenery and explore what used to be considered skyscrapers before there was steel and glass. The first night at Woljeongsa Temple, I watched the rain for an hour, surprised at how quickly I didn’t miss TV, Instagram or email when facing a mountain forest outside the wood-frame paper doors. Woljeongsa offers a temple-stay program; visitors seeking insight, serenity or just affordable, zero-frills accommodations are allowed to bed down for the night in guest housing. Except there isn’t really a bed so much as a comfy pad, a thick blanket and a heated cement floor. The program offers varying levels of participation in prayers, rituals and duties, but I chose the option that offered time and freedom to explore Odaesan park and the other temples that seem as much a part of nature as the rocks and trees. Meals are included, which gave me a chance to get familiar with a more natural vegetarian fare, mostly vegetables, soup, rice, various forms of tofu and, of course, kimchi. There are subtle reminders that this is a working temple, not just a static shrine — among them the dining hall, a brightly lit cafeteria with kitchen and a cleaning station where diners, including temple-stay guests, do their own dishes. The trail to Jeongmyeolbogung is a dauntingly steep switchback path that climbs through the forest — and is lined the entire way with the volleyball-size, brightly colored Buddha lanterns that fill temple courtyards and line many of the park’s hiking trails. While I passed Sajaam Temple, a multistory structure with tiered roofs that followed the profile of the hillside, it began to sink in how much the Buddhism and the land are intertwined in this national park. Closer to the top, the forest thinned and the horizon — rows of rolling peaks and hills — popped into view, carpeted in 20 shades of green. The woman at the information hut offered the requisite paper cup with hot tea that smelled of fig, and some sweet bean-curd pieces that they give to all visitors who reach the mountaintop Jeongmyeolbogung, a shrine of Woljeongsa Temple that shelters a relic of the the Buddha himself, one of the few in Korea. [...] she checked to see if anyone was watching and quickly dug out the junk food — two packages of chocolate-coated “creme cookies.” On first approach to Seoraksan National Park, the sheer volume of tourists arriving on buses was worrisome. During a detour to Pyeongchang, the county hosting the 2018 Winter Olympics, I had found the “natural beauty” heavily developed at the two sprawling ski resorts of Alpensia and Yongpyong, where most of the events will be. While I was glad that TV viewers would see a side to South Korea other than urban Seoul, I also was glad I hadn’t planned to spend time there. [...] after I entered the park and as the broad valley opened up, some of the greatest hits of the Taebaek Mountains came into view, and the crowds dissipated. After what seemed like more stairs than in a Seoul skyscraper, I walked out on a ledge to see the rest of Ulsan Bawi, an oversized jagged wall, seemingly built to defend against invading armies or monsters. Crews are working to complete the high-speed rail line from Seoul to Pyeongchang in time for the 2018 Winter Olympics, which will make Gangwon more accessible. If driving, most car rentals (especially to Western tourists, apparently) come with a GPS unit. United Airlines and Korean Air fly regular nonstops from San Francisco to Seoul, starting around $800 round-trip.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Toyota’s First Venture Arm Gets $100M for AI, Robotics, Mobility Startups
    By Bernadette Tansey - Tuesday Jul 11, 2017

    Toyota Research Institute, the Toyota R&D unit that has parked branches near Stanford and two other top U.S. research universities, is now spinning out a corporate venture capital arm that will finance and incubate startups in artificial intelligence, robotics, and autonomous mobility. The research institute, also known as TRI, is devoting at least $100 million […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Nearly 2 tons of seized ivory to be crushed in Central Park
    By MARY ESCH, Associated Press - Thursday Aug 3, 2017

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Nearly two tons of trinkets, statues and jewelry crafted from the tusks of at least 100 slaughtered elephants are heading for a rock crusher in New York City's Central Park to demonstrate the state's commitment to smashing the illegal ivory trade.[...] state environmental officials, who are partnering with the Wildlife Conservation Society and Tiffany & Co. for Thursday's "Ivory Crush," say no price justifies slaughtering elephants for their tusks.Last year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service instituted a near-total ban on the domestic commercial ivory trade and barred sales across state lines.Since August 2014, New York law has prohibited the sale, purchase, trade or distribution of anything made from elephant or mammoth ivory or rhinoceros horn, except in limited situations with state approval.The World Wildlife Fund says the illegal wildlife trade not only threatens animal populations, but also endangers national security by funding terrorist cells.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • National park icons threatened by wind-frenzied wildfires
    By MATT VOLZ and SUDHIN THANAWALA, Associated Press - Monday Sep 4, 2017

    HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Winds wreaked havoc on wildfires that were threatening two crown jewels of the National Park Service on Monday, pushing the flames toward manmade and natural icons in and around Glacier and Yosemite national parks.The wind-driven fires, combined with high temperatures and dry conditions, have disrupted holiday travel and hampered firefighters across the West during a Labor Day weekend that capped a devastating summer in which an area larger than Rhode Island has burned.The dozens of fires burning across the West and Canada have blanketed the air with choking smoke from Oregon, where ash fell on the town of Cascade Locks, to Colorado, where health officials issued an air quality advisory alert.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
clean air car service amp parking branch two llc flushing ny