china wok II restaurant inc

725 hawkins avenue
lake ronkonkoma, new york 11779

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 20, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4624877

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - CHINA WOK II RESTAURANT INC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Tom Colicchio Changes His Restaurant’s Racially Tinged Name
    By KIM SEVERSON - Wednesday Aug 23, 2017

    The chef is renaming Fowler & Wells, after learning about the name’s connection with the debunked theories of phrenology.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Restaurant Review: A New Kind of Sichuan Restaurant for New York
    By PETE WELLS - Tuesday Aug 1, 2017

    In downtown Flushing, Queens, Guan Fu Sichuan shows off the rich variety of flavors beyond the familiar blast of chiles.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Restaurant Review: At Don Peppe, Expect a Lot of Everything
    By PETE WELLS - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    The hallowed Italian-American restaurant is near the airport and the racetrack in Queens, but it’s in a world of its own.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Restaurant Review: Vegetables With Benefits at ABCV
    By PETE WELLS - Monday Jul 3, 2017

    The menu at Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s new vegetarian restaurant in the Flatiron district tries to impart “plant-based intelligence.”

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Restaurant Review: The Grill Is Confident, Theatrical, Sharp and New Yorky
    By PETE WELLS - Tuesday Aug 22, 2017

    The former Grill Room of the Four Seasons now holds a restaurant with a full-battery charge.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • One Day, One Place: Washington’s shadowy spy history
    By Spud Hilton - Thursday Aug 3, 2017

    [...] the capital that bears his name today has carried on the grand tradition pretty much since it became the seat of power, through civil wars, world wars, cold wars, computer wars and everything in between. Fortunately, while the realm of spies historically has been a shadowy underworld rarely witnessed by the public, there are enough historical sites worth visiting around the District — including a few with great drinks and cuisine — as well as a captivating museum dedicated to the topic and the mysterious people and practices involved. Grab breakfast — maybe even the vaguely appropriate eggs Benedict — at the Mayflower Hotel, where supposedly FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover ate lunch daily for 20 years (the restaurant is now called Edgar). Because of its proximity to the White House, the Mayflower has plenty of brushes with presidential history — Franklin Roosevelt and Harry Truman both lived there. (There are maps at some stations showing the 20-minute ride out to the site of a mailbox that CIA officer Aldrich Ames used to communicated with Soviet contacts — except the current mailbox is a replacement.) Sites in the area include the Wok and Roll Restaurant, once Mary Surratt’s boarding house where John Wilkes Booth plotted with his confederates to assassinate Abraham Lincoln and two others. [...] drop by the Pullman House, a Beaux Arts mansion built by the family of Pullman railcar fame, but that for decades was the Embassy of Russia or the Soviet Union (until 1994). Grab lunch at the Occidental, a popular dining spot for politicians, celebrities, deal-makers and, apparently, spies. Photos of the restaurant’s more famous diners cover the walls — supposedly you can tell a lot about Washington from how the photos are rearranged. Save the entire afternoon for the International Spy Museum, a sprawling collection of artifacts, displays and history about espionage, as well as exercises for would-be spies looking to hone their skills (memorize a “cover story” and be tested on it). The museum is organized by historical era, as well as by technology and popular culture; don’t miss displays of assassination tools, secret listening devices, the most notorious spies and an entire section on James Bond. (There’s even a small display recognizing famed chef Julia Child, who worked for the Office of Strategic Services during World War II.) Save a little time for the museum’s gift shop, an enormous collection of trinkets, books and gadgets for would-be spies. Head out to Georgetown for drinks and dinner at Mr. Smith’s of Georgetown, formerly Chadwick’s, a popular pub near the Potomac River where in 1985, Aldrich Ames, handed about 7 pounds of secret documents to Soviet diplomat Sergey Chuvakhin, including a list of Soviet citizens gathering information for the CIA. Finish the night a few blocks up Wisconsin Avenue at Martin’s Tavern, a corner lounge known to be a favorite spot of Nathan Gregory Silvermaster, a U.S. government economist who was said to have operated a ring of communist spies and was a member of the Soviet secret police.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
china wok ii restaurant inc lake ronkonkoma ny