cartridge data supplies, inc.

80 state st.
albany, new york 12207

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 17, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4545839

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
CORPORATION SERVICE COMPANY
80 STATE ST.
ALBANY, NEW YORK, 12207

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - CARTRIDGE DATA SUPPLIES, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • A Handmaid’s Tale of Protest
    By CHRISTINE HAUSER - Friday Jun 30, 2017

    In state capitals and street protests, women’s rights activists have been wearing red robes and white bonnets based on “The Handmaid's Tale,” the 1985 novel that is now a series on Hulu.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Staples Is Said to Agree to $6.5 Billion Buyout
    By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED - Wednesday Jun 28, 2017

    The private equity firm Sycamore Partners is looking to add the office supply chain to its portfolio of retailers.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • New Facebook data center a boost to Ohio's technology sector
    By JULIE CARR SMYTH, Associated Press - Tuesday Aug 15, 2017

    NEW ALBANY, Ohio (AP) — Facebook will invest $750 million in a new data center in central Ohio, the company announced Tuesday — marking another boost for the state's growing technology sector.The world's biggest social media company joined Republican Gov. John Kasich and a host of other dignitaries to announce its 10th data center will be on a 345-acre site in New Albany, just northeast of Columbus.Rachel Peterson, the company's director of data center strategy and development, said several factors attracted Facebook to the location, including fiber and power infrastructure, government support, livability and the availability of high-tech talent.Facebook has been adding data centers in the U.S. and internationally to handle the growing number of photos, videos and additional digital content it must process from its 2 billion users.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Tech News
  • Apple Says Qualcomm Has Overcharged Billions of Dollars By 'Double-Dipping' on iPhone's Innovation
    By Joe Rossignol - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Apple has expanded its lawsuit against Qualcomm, accusing the wireless chipmaker of "double-dipping" by way of unfair patent licensing agreements, according to an amended complaint filed with a United States federal court in San Diego today.


    The complaint broadens the claims Apple made in its original lawsuit against Qualcomm in January, when it sued the chipmaker for $1 billion in alleged unpaid royalty rebates. Apple also accused its longtime supplier of the iPhone's wireless chip of engaging in anticompetitive licensing practices.

    Since the original iPhone, Qualcomm has supplied Apple with modems that enable the smartphone to, for example, connect to a Wi-Fi or LTE network. But as the iPhone has gained more features, Apple argues that Qualcomm has been unfairly "levying its own tax" on those innovations through "exorbitant royalties."

    Apple said Qualcomm wrongly bases its royalties on a percentage of the entire iPhone's value, despite supplying just a single component of the device.

    As Apple innovates, Qualcomm demands more. Qualcomm had nothing to do with creating the revolutionary Touch ID, the world’s most popular camera, or the Retina display Apple’s customers love, yet Qualcomm wants to be paid as if these (and future) breakthroughs belong to it. Qualcomm insists in this Court that it should be entitled to rely on the same business model it applied over a decade ago to the flip phone but while that model may have been defensible when a phone was just a phone, today it amounts to a scheme of extortion that allows Qualcomm unfairly to maintain and entrench its existing monopoly.
    The licensing agreements are in addition to paying for the wireless chips themselves. Apple said Qualcomm's "double-dipping, extra-reward system" is precisely the kind that the U.S. Supreme Court recently forbade in a lawsuit between Lexmark and a small company reselling its printer cartridges.
    If that were not enough, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent landmark decision in Impression Products, Inc. v. Lexmark International, Inc., condemned Qualcomm’s business model as a violation of U.S. patent law. The Supreme Court flatly rejected Qualcomm’s business model, holding that a patent holder may demand only “one reward” for its patented products, and when it has secured the reward for its invention, it may not, under the patent laws, further restrict the use or enjoyment of the item. Qualcomm, by its own admission, will not sell chips to manufacturers who do not also pay separate royalties and enter Qualcomm licenses at usurious rates. This is precisely the kind of double-dipping, extra-reward system that the Court’s decision in Lexmark forbids.
    Apple said it has been "overcharged billions of dollars" due to Qualcomm's so-called "illegal scheme," including the $1 billion in unpaid royalty rebates that led Apple to sue Qualcomm in January.

    In its countersuit, Qualcomm accused Apple of failing to engage in good faith negotiations for a license to its 3G and 4G standard essential patents on fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory (FRAND) terms.

    Apple, however, argues that Qualcomm's monopolistic licensing demands violate its FRAND obligations.
    By tying together the markets for chipsets and licenses to technology in cellular standards, Qualcomm illegally enhances and strengthens its monopoly in each market and eliminates competition. Then, Qualcomm leverages its market power to extract exorbitant royalties, later agreeing to reduce those somewhat only in exchange for additional anticompetitive advantages and restrictions on challenging Qualcomm’s power, further solidifying its stranglehold on the industry.
    Apple also claims that Qualcomm has never made it a worldwide offer on FRAND terms for a direct license to its patented technologies.

    Apple said Qualcomm subsequently filing lawsuits against iPhone manufacturers Foxconn, Pegatron, Wistron, and Compal reveals "its true bullying nature," calling it "a blatant attempt to exert pressure on Apple to acquiesce to" its "non-FRAND royalty demands" by attacking its smaller contract manufacturers.
    Qualcomm knows that these are companies who have been effectively coerced by its monopoly practices in the past. Qualcomm knows that these companies merely pass through the usuriously high royalty demanded by Qualcomm and so have little incentive to resist its monopolistic tactics.
    Apple has called for the court to declare Qualcomm's patents in the lawsuit unessential to 3G/4G standards used in the iPhone and its other products, and to prevent Qualcomm from taking any adverse or legal action against Apple's contract manufacturers related to the allegations in today's amended complaint.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Lawmaker seeks probe after AP reveals maggots in NY facility
    By DAVID KLEPPER, Associated Press - Saturday Aug 12, 2017

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A New York state lawmaker is demanding a federal investigation into New York state's care for the disabled following a recent Associated Press story that revealed the case of a man infested with maggots in a state-run group home.Democratic Assemblyman Anthony Brindisi, of Utica, told the AP on Saturday that he is asking the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to investigate the group home and other state-regulated facilities for the disabled where there have been allegations of abuse and neglect.A copy of the report was obtained by The Associated Press, which found that New York state is not alone in making it difficult for members of the public to access records about allegations of abuse and neglect in state-regulated facilities for the disabled.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Trump tweets that transgender people can’t serve in military
    Wednesday Jul 26, 2017

    President Trump set off a bipartisan firestorm Wednesday morning by tweeting that the government will not allow transgender people to serve in the military “in any capacity.”In a series of early morning tweets, Trump wrote, After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military.Republicans also expressed disappointment and outrage at Trump for posting policy decisions on social media.Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who also serves as the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, called Trump’s statement unclear and promised that the committee would conduct oversight on the issue of transgender people serving in the military.In a White House press briefing later that day, Sarah Huckabee, the White House press secretary, said that the announcement was “something that the Department of Defense and the White House iwll have to work together on as implementation takes place.”Rep. Scott Peters (D-San Diego) filed an amendment to the Department of Defense Appropriations bill to block Trump’s decision to ban transgender people from entering the military service.The amendment states that government funds for defense can’t be used to “implement, enforce, or observe any directive” from the president that “bars or restricts the ability of transgender persons to serve in the Armed Forces.”The order, signed by Truman on July 26, 1948, stated, “It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin.”The RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research group, found that the costs of gender-transition related to health care treatment is “relatively low.”The total cost of medical care for transgender troops would increase health care costs by between $2.4 million and $8.4 million annually, representing a 0.04- to 0.13-percent increase in health care expenditures.Transgender reassignment surgery — which not every trans person chooses to undergo — can cost anywhere from a few thousand dollars per person to nearly $100,000, depending on how extensive it ias, according to Courtney D’Allaird, founding coordinator for the Genderal and Sexuality Resource Center at the University of Albany, N.Y.“Weren’t we just last year christening the Harvey Milk vessel in the Navy?” D’Allaird said, referring to the 2016 announcement that a Navy supply vessel is being named after the gay rights pioneer of San Francisco.Aaron Belkin, director of the Palm Center, a public policy think tank at UC Santa Barbara, said Trump’s announcement would cause discrimination and ultimately harms military readiness.In June 2016, former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter announced that transgender individuals would be able to serve in the U.S. armed forces.In June, Gen. James Mattis, Trump’s defense secretary, delayed Carter’s plan to accept transgender troops and to accommodate transgender service members’ medical needs by six months.In February, Trump rescinded federal protections that were implemented for transgender students, allowing them to use bathrooms that coincided with their gender identity.Trump’s tweeted announcement comes about a year after he pledged in his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention to protect the rights LGBTQ people.

    Source: SFGATE.com: LGBT
cartridge data supplies inc albany ny