caring supported housing managing member corporation

corporation
191 joralemon st 2nd flr
brooklyn, new york 11201

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 13, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4444774

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - CARING SUPPORTED HOUSING MANAGING MEMBER CORPORATION
2013 - CCBQ COMMUNITIES MANAGING MEMBER CORPORATION









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Senate Leaders Try to Appease Members as Support for Health Bill Slips
    By ROBERT PEAR and THOMAS KAPLAN - Sunday Jun 25, 2017

    With criticism mounting over their bill to repeal the Affordable Care Act, top Republicans are cutting deals and cajoling members to get to 50 votes.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Neighborhoods That Play Hard to Get
    By STEFANOS CHEN - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    In some New York neighborhoods, the housing stock is great, but turnover is so low, word of mouth is the best search engine.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Haven for Recovering Addicts Now Profits From Their Relapses
    By LIZETTE ALVAREZ - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Delray Beach, Fla., was once a godsend for substance abusers. But now, a sprawl of fraudulent outpatient centers capitalize on addicts’ thwarted recoveries.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Trump tweets that transgender people can’t serve in military
    Wednesday Jul 26, 2017

    President Trump set off a bipartisan firestorm Wednesday morning by tweeting that the government will not allow transgender people to serve in the military “in any capacity.”In a series of early morning tweets, Trump wrote, After consultation with my Generals and military experts, please be advised that the United States Government will not accept or allow Transgender individuals to serve in any capacity in the U.S. Military.Republicans also expressed disappointment and outrage at Trump for posting policy decisions on social media.Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who also serves as the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, called Trump’s statement unclear and promised that the committee would conduct oversight on the issue of transgender people serving in the military.In a White House press briefing later that day, Sarah Huckabee, the White House press secretary, said that the announcement was “something that the Department of Defense and the White House iwll have to work together on as implementation takes place.”Rep. Scott Peters (D-San Diego) filed an amendment to the Department of Defense Appropriations bill to block Trump’s decision to ban transgender people from entering the military service.The amendment states that government funds for defense can’t be used to “implement, enforce, or observe any directive” from the president that “bars or restricts the ability of transgender persons to serve in the Armed Forces.”The order, signed by Truman on July 26, 1948, stated, “It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin.”The RAND Corporation, a nonprofit research group, found that the costs of gender-transition related to health care treatment is “relatively low.”The total cost of medical care for transgender troops would increase health care costs by between $2.4 million and $8.4 million annually, representing a 0.04- to 0.13-percent increase in health care expenditures.Transgender reassignment surgery — which not every trans person chooses to undergo — can cost anywhere from a few thousand dollars per person to nearly $100,000, depending on how extensive it ias, according to Courtney D’Allaird, founding coordinator for the Genderal and Sexuality Resource Center at the University of Albany, N.Y.“Weren’t we just last year christening the Harvey Milk vessel in the Navy?” D’Allaird said, referring to the 2016 announcement that a Navy supply vessel is being named after the gay rights pioneer of San Francisco.Aaron Belkin, director of the Palm Center, a public policy think tank at UC Santa Barbara, said Trump’s announcement would cause discrimination and ultimately harms military readiness.In June 2016, former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter announced that transgender individuals would be able to serve in the U.S. armed forces.In June, Gen. James Mattis, Trump’s defense secretary, delayed Carter’s plan to accept transgender troops and to accommodate transgender service members’ medical needs by six months.In February, Trump rescinded federal protections that were implemented for transgender students, allowing them to use bathrooms that coincided with their gender identity.Trump’s tweeted announcement comes about a year after he pledged in his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention to protect the rights LGBTQ people.

    Source: SFGATE.com: LGBT
  • Uneasy Welcome as Ultra-Orthodox Jews Extend Beyond New York
    By JOSEPH BERGER - Wednesday Aug 2, 2017

    The arrival of 62 Hasidic families in Jersey City is part of a major influx of ultra-Orthodox Jews to communities around New York City.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • 3 Ways to Hire and Retain the Best Nonprofit Communicators
    Wednesday Feb 15, 2017

    Savvy communications directors with deep expertise and track records of success in larger nonprofits are, in my experience, a bit like the Painted Bunting who unexpectedly took up residence here in Brooklyn recently; rare birds that can be difficult to attract, spot, and head south for the winter too soon. When the right person applies to work for you and stays, spearheading game-changing communications projects year after year, you’ve hit the jackpot.

    Here are three ways you can hire and retain the best nonprofit communicators:

    Want a pro? Hire a pro.
    It sounds funny to say, but if you want an expert communications director, you need to actually hire one. That often means resisting the urge to promote that programs person who you think is a good communicator just because they’ve worked at your org for awhile and “get it.” Try to avoid hiring that great person from the corporate world who comes without nonprofit experience too. Instead, recruit people with solid backgrounds working in nonprofit communications already so they can bring their knowledge of the sector, strategy, and skills with them.

    Kivi Leroux-Miller and I recently collaborated on a study of successful in-house communications teams that revealed that hiring expert nonprofit communications professionals was a critical factor. (Download our ebook “What it Takes to Be Great: The top five factors of successful nonprofit communications teams” here).

    Big team? Invest in a strong second-in-command.
    I recently invited a handful of senior communicators at nonprofit organizations with operating budgets of 100 million dollars or more to meet each other over breakfast at Big Duck and share how their teams are structured. While each nonprofit’s communications team varied in size (from 1.5 to 14 full-time employees!) the directors in the room who seemed the happiest (and calmest) all had one thing in common: a strong second-in-command.

    Senior-level communications pros don’t want want to do it all themselves, and they know it’s not a good use of donor dollars if they do. A strong Number Two gives your communications director the ability to step out of the weeds of managing every project, focus on setting priorities, and work more on the high-value projects. This generates greater value for the nonprofit, who’s likely paying that director a six-figure salary, and pushes down the day-to-day communications work to people who are less expensive, just starting their careers, and need to build these skills. It also provides your organization with a working succession plan if your director leaves.
    ?These Number Two spots are great opportunities to develop rising stars—and a more appropriate place for someone who’s entering your organization from the corporate sector or another department. They can be mentored by the Director while getting hands-on experience assuming management responsibilities.

    Lots to do? Set priorities and be ruthless.
    Communications teams have important strategic work to do: raising awareness, changing hearts and minds, engaging donors or members, recruiting participants to programs, strengthening the brand experience, and more. This work can take years to do successfully and well; it requires planning, budgeting, buy-in,methodical oversight, and execution.

    At the same time, many communications teams also function as an internal agency. They are asked to create flyers for events at the last minute, help a department finesse and send an email out, and more to accommodate projects on short notice. This work is important too, but it’s often reactive and more tactical. It’s the sort of urgent (but not always important) work that eats up time from the important (but not always urgent) work of proactive, strategic communications.

    That seasoned director you hope will build a nest for years to come will fly away fast if she’s burdened with an unreasonably long list of tasks, murky priorities, no resources for managing more production-based assignments, and left without time to advance the projects where she and her team might add the most value.

    In our ebook, “What it Takes to Be Great: The top five factors of successful nonprofit communications teams,” we confirmed that successful communications teams rely not only on a clear set of priorities, but also the support of leadership who empowers them to be able to say no. At my roundtable of communications pros at large nonprofits there was consensus about this, too.

    If priorities aren’t clear, consider labeling every project your department works on in one of these three ways:

    Fire-extinguishing: these projects and tasks are typically urgent, time-sensitive, and often crisis-driven. They tend to be tactical and often have little or no long-term ROI. For example, fixing your board chair’s misspelled name on that big mailing you’re about to do.

    Optimizing: these projects and tasks usually involve making processes, systems, and tools better. For instance, upgrading Constant Contact to something more state-of-the-art and powerful like Salesforce, or building a better website.

    Seed-planting: these projects and tasks are the essence of important/not urgent work. They won’t bear fruit for some time, but when they do, you’ll feel great. For instance, researching and preparing a 3-year plan for your communications team that builds off of your organization’s strategic plan, includes a budget, and culminates by tackling a big project (such as a rebranding you know you should do but can’t happen soon).

    Labeling these projects and tracking them in a project management system like Basecamp (or even on post-its on your wall) will help you get a clearer sense where your team’s time actually goes. Better yet, consider reviewing how many and what sort of fire-extinguishing, optimizing, and seed-planting projects you’re working on regularly with your boss so you can make sure you’re aligned.

    Looking for more? Just reach out.
    If you’re a CEO searching for your own Painted Bunting at a mid-size or larger organization, contact us. We might be able to help.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
caring supported housing managing member corporation brooklyn ny