caribbean american sports and cultural organization, inc.

43 main st.
hempstead, new york 11550

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 18, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4375269

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC NOT-FOR-PROFIT CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - CARIBBEAN AMERICAN SPORTS AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • NY man due in court in killings of mom, sister, 3rd woman
    Sunday Aug 13, 2017

    HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) — A man accused of bludgeoning his mother, sister and another woman to death after being kicked out of his home on New York's Long Island is headed to court.Suffolk County police say Vanderhall had a history of emotional problems, and his mother had gotten a protective order against him and had thrown him out of their Hempstead home.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • US relying on inexperienced players in Gold Cup
    By Kyle Schnitzer - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    The CONCACAF Gold Cup, which kicks off Friday, likely will lack the punch from years past, but it will serve as an introduction for international up-and-comers. The Gold Cup, played once every two years, showcases the 12 teams that qualified through regional tournaments in the North American, Central American and Caribbean regions. Rivals U.S. and...

    Source: New York Post: Sports
  • 19th-Century Diary Suggests Slaves Are Buried in Brooklyn Lot
    By MICHAEL WILSON - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    A Gowanus farmer’s writings from 1828 to 1830 describe burying them on property that includes the proposed site of a prekindergarten.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Roger Abrahams, folklorist who studied African American language, dies
    By William Grimes - Saturday Jul 1, 2017

    Roger Abrahams, folklorist who studied African American language, diesRoger Abrahams, one of the first folklorists to study the language and performance styles of black Americans as reflected in songs, proverbs and riddles both old and new, died June 20 in Sunnyvale.Mr. Abrahams (pronounced Abrams) cast his net wide, exploring Anglo-American folk songs, jump-rope rhymes and counting rhymes, but devoted most of his scholarly energies to the African diaspora in the Caribbean and the United States.Earlier folklorists had focused on black religious expression, the language of the church and pulpit.The Emergence of African American Culture in the Plantation South (1992), Mr. Abrahams turned back the clock to study the corn-shucking ceremony, a ritual with songs and chants that he reconstructed through newspaper accounts, travelers tales and diaries as a means of understanding the social dynamics of plantation society.Historian Wilson Moses, reviewing the book in the Historian, called Mr. Abrahams “probably the most celebrated living preservationist of African American secular oral traditions.”John Szwed, Mr. Abrahams’ collaborator on “Discovering Afro-America” (1975) and the essay collection Blues for New Orleans:After earning a master’s degree in literature and folklore from Columbia University in 1959, Mr. Abrahams returned to the University of Pennsylvania, where, under the direction of Leach, was awarded a doctorate in literature and folklore in 1961.To better understand the African roots of African American folk practices and verbal styles, Mr. Abrahams did extensive field research in the Caribbean, beginning with a week on St. Kitts and Nevis in 1962.With ethnomusicologist Alan Lomax, he recorded sea chanteys and the songs performed at tea meetings, a combination variety show and church fundraiser.Mr. Abrahams pursued his interest in black speech and street culture in the United States in several works that, like “Deep Down in the Jungle,” rejected the current argument that black Americans suffered not only from poverty but from a deficient culture.Mr. Abrahams taught for many years in the English department of the University of Texas in Austin, where he also served as the director of the African and Afro-American Research Institute.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Bay Area News
  • One Person’s Genetic Mutation Is Another Person’s Culture
    By Cyndi Suarez - Monday Aug 14, 2017

    As news of a breakthrough in human gene editing coincided with the 27th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Rebecca Cokley, former executive director of the National Council on Disability, considered the implications.

    The post One Person’s Genetic Mutation Is Another Person’s Culture appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • Chron quiz: The North’s nukes
    By Marshall Kilduff - Thursday Aug 10, 2017

    Source: SFGATE.com: Opinion Shop Blog - Chron Quiz
caribbean american sports and cultural organization inc hempstead ny