bts brands international LLC

612 corporate way
valley cottage, new york 10989

NYS Entity Status
INACTIVE - Dissolution (Jun 27, 2014)

NYS Filing Date
MAY 27, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4583003

County
ROCKLAND

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - BTS BRANDS INTERNATIONAL LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Living the Urban Life Upstate
    By KIM VELSEY - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    A New York couple who prefer to rent in the thick of things, even in a Hudson Valley town.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Little Games, Big Engagement
    Friday Sep 23, 2011

    One of the challenges brands often face when they look at getting into gaming is cost and time. Concepting a game people will actually play takes a great deal of time and specialized skills. Butsometimes, the simplest games can engage thousands of people if the right circumstances come together.

    Source: Media Post: Gaming Insider
  • North Korea Accuses U.S. of ‘Mugging’ Its Diplomats in New York
    By CHOE SANG-HUN - Sunday Jun 18, 2017

    Officials returning from a United Nations conference were about to board a plane when federal agents seized a package they were carrying.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Fit City: Taking Night-Life Cue, Gyms Lower the Lights
    By TATIANA BONCOMPAGNI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Cycling, boxing and running studios, as well as some full-service gyms, are using sophisticated lighting systems to heighten the exercise experience.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Can Cottage Cheese Become The Next Greek Yogurt?
    By Rina Raphael - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Big curds are seeing big profits as startups and big food conglomerates look to rebrand the unsexy dairy staple.

    During his presidency, the late Gerald Ford reportedly asked the White House chef for the same meal each day—cottage cheese served with a dollop of ketchup.

    Read Full Story

    Source: Fast Company
  • Why bad brand architecture happens to good organizations
    Tuesday Oct 4, 2016

    As nonprofits grow and evolve over time, their brands can get complicated. Rather than maintaining one unified look, organizations often create new logos, names, and other unique elements for their programs and initiatives. More often than not, this happens because an organization lacks a strategic framework for managing its brand over time. Things can get very messy.

    Brand architecture is about defining and expressing the roles and relationships among the various brands and sub-brands of an organization. Sometimes having more complex brand architecture is the strategic thing to do, but usually, less is more.

    Managing a single brand successfully is a time-intensive discipline. Managing multiple brands can be nearly impossible—and usually not strategic—for most nonprofits. Complicating an organization’s brand architecture can be counter-productive—both for the staff managing the various brands internally and for the audiences the brands are intended to engage.

    What causes nonprofit brands to get so complicated and disconnected? We see two big reasons.

    Internal factors

    Without clear guidelines to follow (for instance, in the form of a brand guide or a communications director’s coaching), staff often take the opportunity to develop a new name, logo, color palette, or other elements for a program or initiative. They may feel it’s easier to do that than to navigate red tape, or they may be taking the opportunity to express their own personal tastes or vision for their program.

    Organizational silos can also cause issues when it comes to branding. Without strong internal communications, and the clear role of a communications team, brands can take on a life of their own.

    No matter the size of your organization's communication team—whether it’s one person or five—there should be a go-to person or “brand champion” you can seek approval and guidance from about the brand. They should also oversee a simple set of brand guidelines that all staff have access to and make sure new hires and old are clear what they are and how to use them. The brand champion should clearly communicate their role to staff and follow up regularly so that new and long-time staff members are reminded of the guidelines in place.

    External factors

    Brand architecture often gets complicated because of concerns about external perceptions or buy-in. Some of these concerns are less valid than others. For example, in an organization merger or acquisition, one organization may decide to keep the established identity of another in addition to its own to retain any brand equity it may have. Staff may feel like the risk of alienating or confusing longtime supporters by changing the identity of a program just isn’t worth it. Plenty of organizations also choose to name a program or facility in honor of a major donor or influential person in the organization’s history.

    Both approaches may seem wise in the short term but can cause branding complications long term. We recommend thinking about what brand architecture system is going to be clearest to your key audiences in the long term. Then work backwards to decide on what interim changes need to be made to your current brand to get there.

    Ultimately brand architecture is usually the result of unasked questions about whether all the various sub-brands under your organization’s umbrella are really necessary. To be able to navigate these decisions, define a brand architecture strategy that maps out guidelines for sub-branding. This should all be codified in your organization’s brand guide: your organization’s go-to resource for all things branding.

    Need help? Just give us a call! We regularly help larger organizations navigate these waters.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Three core ingredients that will help you ensure your new brand sticks.
    Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Have you ever invested a bunch of time and energy in a project but the work just didn’t stick? Take, for example, strategic planning. After months of deep thinking and hard work, it’s a shame when good work ends up sitting on the shelf in a binder, not actually getting implemented. There are few things more frustrating—and unfortunately commonplace—in the nonprofit world, when every day and dollar counts.

    When it comes to building a strong nonprofit brand—the type of brand that has equity, that stands out, and that inspires support—the work must take hold internally. Like the roots of a tree, the deeper and more established they are, the stronger and higher the branches and leaves can grow. If staff are not aligned internally or equipped with the right internal resources, chances are they will hit big roadblocks when trying to communicate externally, diminishing the consistency and expression of the new brand.

    Here are three core ingredients to help you build an enduring nonprofit brand that sticks—from the inside out.

    1) Brand team. Building and maintaining a strong nonprofit brand takes a village. Bringing the right people into the process and establishing their ownership of the new brand is integral to getting the work right and ensuring it sticks long-term. Staff, leadership, and other key stakeholders should be tasked with clear assignments and responsibilities, ideally from the very start of the rebranding process. Brand trainings and clear protocols for using the brand can help, and clear accountability post-launch. Trying to form the right brand team? Take a look at this blog post I wrote a few months back about getting through a rebrand with the right people on board. (Sarah also has some practical tips for engaging Boards in branding efforts.)   

    2) Brand tools. Your team also needs the right tools for your brand to stick. This starts with the development of a brand strategy, then the brand assets including a strong visual system and messaging platform. Take a look at Sarah’s primer on the elements that make up your brand and how to create a winning brand strategy. Translate those assets into accessible tools that your team can easily use and apply in their day-to-day work to make it easy to use for staff. This is where a great brand guide is useful, as well as an awesome image bank of pre-approved photography that helps tell your story visually, easy-to-use templates, boilerplate copy, elevator pitch, and other resources that staff, board, and other stakeholders can use to stay on-brand in their work.

    3) Brand culture. For a brand to stick, staff must believe in the relevance and power of branding as a strategy for nonprofits, and their own role in maintaining it. Without this fundamental belief in place, the work will struggle to take hold. Thoughtful stakeholder engagement during a rebrand process, followed by brand education and trainings post-launch, should be part of the equation. Consider a series of informal lunch-and-learn sessions in your conference room on the topic of communications. Circulate articles in advance like the ones we’ve referenced above, or consider watching a pre-recorded webinar like this one to jumpstart the conversation.

    Before embarking on your next big project—whether it is a branding initiative, communications strategy, or beyond—think through your plan for getting your efforts to stick. Your organization will need these three key ingredients: a brand team, brand tools, and a brand culture to make sure your rebrand truly takes root and endures. 

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • A Former Navy SEAL On The Hidden Influencers In Every Team
    By Chris Fussell - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    To spot who they are, have every new hire follow this rule for 90 days.

    In 2010, I was an executive officer in the Navy, splitting my time between U.S. headquarters and being deployed to an international location. This arrangement proved tricky as my responsibilities at headquarters grew, so I was authorized to hire a civilian to handle budget management, equipment maintenance, travel, and training coordination, among other functions.

    Read Full Story

    Source: Fast Company