birchwood lane lot 7 LLC

p.o. box 633
bridgehampton, new york 11932

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
FEBRUARY 19, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4531385

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - BIRCHWOOD LANE LOT 7 LLC









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    I scrolled down the list in the Productivity category and saw apps from well-known companies like Dropbox, Evernote, and Microsoft. That was to be expected. But what's this? The #10 Top Grossing Productivity app (as of June 7th, 2017) was an app called "Mobile protection :Clean & Security VPN".

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    In the meantime, users should report scam apps when they see them and inform less savvy friends of this scamming trend until something is done to eradicate it.


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    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors