best healthy ways incorporated

57 37 arverne blvd
arverne, new york 11692

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 24, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4393182

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - BEST HEALTHY WAYS INCORPORATED









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Five Ways To Gamify Your Facebook Marketing
    Friday Jul 6, 2012

    Whether or not you "like" marketing your business on Facebook, your users want to do much more than "like" your business in return. They want to be engaged. Though marketing on the world's largestsocial network is no game, infusing your campaign with gamified elements is one of the best ways to get ahead. Installing gamification at the center of your strategy drives usage and bridges the gapbetween clicks and meaningful activity, building both community and a healthy content stream.

    Source: Media Post: Gaming Insider
  • J&J CEO Gorsky on Wellness and Prevention
    Thursday Sep 29, 2016

    Johnson & Johnson Chairman and CEO Alex Gorsky speaks with WSJ’s Laura Landro about the importance of wellness and prevention, and how creating a healthy environment for employees can bring out their best.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Viewpoints
  • Simple steps you can take to create a happier, healthier nonprofit.
    Tuesday Sep 27, 2016

    Not making time to exercise? Checking email in bed at night and first thing in the morning? Eating fast food at your desk during a conference call? Too many people I know fit that profile. There’s a culture shift that has to occur so people OK when they unplug, take a break, and do what they need to do in order to be able to produce good work.

    In The Happy, Healthy Nonprofit: Strategies for Impact Without Burnout (Wiley, 2016), Beth Kanter and Aliza Sherman open up this long-overdue conversation, defining burn out and showing how to practice self-care as a strategy to avoid it.

    Too many people work tirelessly in their businesses but not on their businesses. This book mandates that we work on ourselves in our businesses—and, while it’s tailored for nonprofits, each chapter is full of practical tips for any business type. The first section starts with a focus on you, the nonprofit staff person or leader, and what you need to work happily and healthily.

    If this were coming from Rodney Yee or Gwyneth Paltrow we’d all be snickering–but it’s coming from Beth Kanter, the sector’s social media and tech wizard, and Aliza Sherman, also a digital diva. When these women tell us to unplug, we take it seriously.

    But this isn’t a book that simply suggests that you unplug. It touches on how you work inside and outside your organization in various ways.  I particularly appreciated the “5 Spheres of Happy, Healthy Living,”  which provides a framework to think about your work in the context of your life.

    "5 Spheres of Happy Healthy Living" © 2016 Kanter/Sherman

    We even get a burnout scale and a self-assessment tool to see how bad things really are.

    Worried your organization will go into a tailspin if you start taking time away for self-care? You don’t have to go from working 24/7 to silent meditation retreats: the book is full of practical ideas and suggestions to help you ease into it.

    Later sections of this book focus on your nonprofit. The authors dive into culture: how to define it and what it really means to have a happy and healthy one. Last, they map out strategies to create a healthy organization with practical tips that might inspire policies, for instance. The connection is obvious: we need to take care of ourselves, but also to exist in organizations that support healthy ways of working.

    Got a boss or board member who drives you to work in unsustainable ways that are making you nuts? Send them a copy of this book. Better yet, read it first, with a highlighter in hand. Put the oxygen mask on yourself first, my friend.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Do Jazzier Descriptions Entice People To Eat More Vegetables?
    By Mary Beth Quirk - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    As America struggles with its obesity epidemic, health advocates continue to seek new ways to convince people to eat more vegetables. But a recent study shows that instead of pushing the healthy aspect of such foods, it might be a better idea to describe veggies with a bit more flair.In a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Expanding Teladoc Adds Network, Tech With $440M Best Doctors Deal
    By David Holley - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    Dallas—In Teladoc’s acquisition of Boston-based Best Doctors—a $440 million cash-and-stock deal that the companies announced Monday—Teladoc (NYSE: TDOC) is gaining a business that lets it offer more specialization in its telemedicine services. Best Doctors connects individuals who have tough decisions to make about treatments—or who want a second opinion about a diagnosis—with top-rated doctors worldwide. […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • 7 Ways to Keep Your Nonprofit Development Team Intact
    Wednesday Apr 19, 2017

    Once you’ve hired experienced communications staff, how do you keep them happy and productive? Leading fundraising consultant, Amy Eisenstein, shares simple recommendations to strengthen relationships with your expert communicators and advice for keeping them on your team for the long haul.

    In my last video, I talked about the importance of development staff staying at their jobs and not job hopping. Today’s video is directed more at Executive Directors in an effort to help you keep your development staff members longer.

    Attention Executive Directors

    As you may know from experience, there’s no worse feeling than when a staff member quits or you need to fire them.

    Today I want to talk about how to prevent both of those things, so that you can keep your development staff for years or even decades.

    The reason this is important is that fundraising is really about relationships. Every time a development staff member leaves, you need to start over. All the relationships that person developed while working at your nonprofit are compromised. Your organization suffers, your donors suffer, and you lose precious fundraising ground.

    If you like your development director and believe they are doing a good job, you should do everything in your power to keep them.

    7 Ways to Retain Your Nonprofit Development Staff

    Here are 7 ways to keep your development staff (in no particular order). Best of all, most of these are low or no cost.

    1. Give more gratitude.
    Everyone loves to be appreciated. How often do you say “thank you” and “great job” to your development staff members? Those two words said often and with sincerity go a long way to keep your team happy.

    2. Provide a raise.
    Yes, there’s no getting around it. Many development directors leave for a higher salary. You may not think you can afford to pay them more, but just think about how much it will cost you when they leave. The fundraising ground you’ll lose… the donor relationships that are compromised.

    In addition, you’ll lose time and money from having a staffing void, you’ll need to retrain a new staff member, and spend money on the hiring process. Replacing a good fundraising staff person can cost anywhere from $10,000 to $50,000 or more in lost fundraising revenue and costs associated with bringing on a new staff member.

    So why not save yourself the trouble and just give your existing staff members a raise?

    3. Allow for flex time.
    I realize you might be uncomfortable with flex time, but the reality is that most fundraising professionals work more than 40 hours per week. They’re expected to be available in the evenings and on weekends for events and meetings.

    So why not provide a little flex time so they can drop their kids off at school, take care of important personal tasks, or even just avoid some rush hour traffic.

    4. Be generous with time off.
    Around your events or busy times, offer a few extra days off. There’s no cheaper way to create good will and loyalty among staff members.

    Also, consider sending staff members home early or even at 5:00 (if they normally work later). Insist they leave to be with their families, get home in time to exercise, or even simply rest and relax. It will come back to you tenfold in hard work and loyalty in days and months to come.

    5. Encourage training and continuing education.
    Training and educational opportunities are a huge perk for most staff members. If you don’t have a large budget for training, offer to give staff paid time off to attend trainings on their own. Also, consider splitting the cost of training with them. After all, you’re both getting something out of it.

    Not only is staff training good for staff, but it’s good for you too. Research shows a significant return on investment for meaningful training opportunities like CFRE, multi-day conferences and college level courses. In fact, recent research found that meaningful major gift training yields an average of $37,000 in additional major gifts raised. That seems well worth the cost of a $2,000 or even $3,000 conference or course.

    6. Provide autonomy and room for growth.
    Don’t micromanage. Trust you development staff member to do a good job. Give them increasing levels of responsibility and trust them to work directly with board members and large donors. Then, simply check in and hold them accountable — but trust them to do their work on their own. They’ll be happier for it.

    7. Allow work from home.
    Have a great staff member or want to hire one you can’t afford? Consider a work-from-home arrangement. Maybe not full time, but one or two days per week to start.

    As someone who does work from home, I rarely work an 8 hour day. But I’m much more productive because I don’t have any colleagues interrupting me or impromptu meetings that keep me from getting the important stuff done.

    Remember — it’s not about the quantity of hours worked, it’s about quality of work done.

    Please also check out my recent post on how to create happy, healthy nonprofits.

    In the meantime, what else have you tried to keep your development staff members happy and productive? Leave a comment and share your ideas.

    Amy Eisenstein, ACFRE, is one of the country's leading fundraising consultants. She's raised millions of dollars for dozens of nonprofits through event planning, grant writing, capital campaigns, and major gift solicitations. She has a real talent for making fundraising simple and accessible for her clients and followers.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Expanding Teladoc Adds Network, Tech With $440M Best Doctors Deal
    By David Holley - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    Dallas—In Teladoc’s acquisition of Boston-based Best Doctors—a $440 million cash-and-stock deal that the companies announced Monday—Teladoc (NYSE: TDOC) is gaining a business that lets it offer more specialization in its telemedicine services. Best Doctors connects individuals who have tough decisions to make about treatments—or who want a second opinion about a diagnosis—with top-rated doctors worldwide. […]

    Source: Xconomy New York
  • Psst…the Backdoor Route to a Roth IRA
    By Your (optional) podcast author email address (Your (optional) podcast author name) - Monday Mar 3, 2014

    High earners can’t contribute directly to popular Roth individual retirement accounts. But there’s still a way in. We explain a simple two-step strategy that works for many people. WSJ's Karen Damato explains.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: Special Reports