benchmark management & development inc.

55 northern blvd.
greenvale, new york 11548

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
OCTOBER 17, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4474079

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - BENCHMARK MANAGEMENT & DEVELOPMENT INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The elusive millennials: are they worth chasing?
    Monday Dec 5, 2016

    Ah, millennials—they’re the constantly SnapChatting young people with attention spans that shorten every day. (I’m allowed to say this because I’m one of them!) As millennials make up more and more of the workforce and their buying power increases, organizations are obsessing about how to get them to care about their cause—and ultimately how to get them to give.

    This obsession has led to tons of research about the generation, and after doing a little digging, I noticed that the research doesn’t always match up. For instance, MobileCause said millennials give to causes, rather than specific organizations or brands, but Inc. 500 found millennials to be extremely brand loyal compared to other generations.

    So what’s the deal? Do millennials care about a specific organization or not? And how does that affect their likelihood to give? Big Duck’s new market research tool, the Brandraising Benchmark, also digs into questions like these, and our June survey returned some interesting results about young people:

    1. 18-34 year olds had some of the highest levels of awareness of participating organizations. This means they were more likely than other, older age groups to claim that they’d heard of a participating organization. This was true for nonprofits large and small, and across a variety of sectors.
    2. When asked about the importance of participating organizations’ mission statements, 18-34 year olds were more likely than any other age group to say the mission was very or extremely important. Again, true for nonprofits of all sizes and a variety of sectors.
    3. When asked about their likelihood to donate in the future, 18-34 year olds were more likely than all other age groups to say they probably or definitely would donate. Again, true for organizations large and small, and across sectors.

    So perhaps all the obsession over millennials is warranted: they’re aware of what’s going on in the nonprofit sector and excited about donating. What’s more, they seem to be aware of specific organizations (not just the issues behind them), so they may pay more attention to your brand than you might expect.

    My biggest takeaway about all of this is that developing a brand that inspires connection is more important than ever. Think Nike or Old Spice, and think fast because this age group has a lot of organizations vying for their attention.

    If you want to know what millennials (and other demographics) think of your organization specifically, sign up for our Brandraising Benchmark.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • A Former Navy SEAL On The Hidden Influencers In Every Team
    By Chris Fussell - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    To spot who they are, have every new hire follow this rule for 90 days.

    In 2010, I was an executive officer in the Navy, splitting my time between U.S. headquarters and being deployed to an international location. This arrangement proved tricky as my responsibilities at headquarters grew, so I was authorized to hire a civilian to handle budget management, equipment maintenance, travel, and training coordination, among other functions.

    Read Full Story

    Source: Fast Company
  • IoT Analytics report: The journey towards successful IoT solutions
    By ReadWrite Sponsors - Tuesday Apr 25, 2017

    The IoT Analytics team recently published an infographic highlighting the 5-step path towards successful implementation of IoT solutions. The insights are based on more than 30 expert interviews in IoT as well as recent research. For more information, you may refer to the Guide to IoT Solution Development.In this 31-page guide, you will find:A benchmark of eight major IoT vendors along 15 components of an IoT solutionKey learnings from current IoT projectsThree deep dives on crucial IoT aspects like security, interconnectivity, and manageabilityYou can download the infographic here....Read More

    Source: ReadWriteWeb
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • It might be time to kill your newsletter
    Thursday May 11, 2017

    Ah - the nonprofit newsletter. That communications tactic that’s so ubiquitous that you probably can’t imagine life without it. Like sliced bread. Or kale in Brooklyn. From the days of twenty page printed quarterlies (mailed the old fashioned way), to 2017 when our subscribers spend a few seconds thumbing through our content on their mobile devices, if we’re lucky. The nonprofit newsletter is destined to stand the test of time. Right?

    I’m here today to make a potentially controversial statement: It’s time to say goodbye to the newsletter as we know it. Chances are your investment in it is simply just not worth the time and energy as it used to be.

    As you are well aware, developing a newsletter takes a lot: content sourcing, writing, designing, formatting, testing. It can take hours, days, weeks to assemble—with touches, input, and approval from countless people throughout the organization—inside and outside the communications team.

    Why do so many nonprofits take on the burden of producing the equivalent of a magazine a month that gets an average 1.5 percent click through rate and 14 percent open rate? Those figures are down from 2015, according to M+R's 11th Benchmarks Study of nonprofit digital advocacy, fundraising, social, and advertising. If your organization is in this predicament, it’s time for a new approach. This doesn't mean you should scrap the operation entirely (though it could)—but I bet there are some adjustments that you could make to get a better return. So, hold your horses, I’m not saying that the goal of your nonprofit newsletter isn’t important, I’m just saying that there are probably better [i.e. more efficient, leaner, and high-value] ways to achieve that goal.

    Before you pull the plug (or press pause on that enews that’s about to blast in an hour) here are some questions to help you think this through.

    What’s your enewsletter costing you?

    How much total time is your entire team spending on your enews? Don’t know? Add it up. Track it honestly (There are lots of free time-tracking tools you can use if Excel is not your friend). Once you have a rough figure, take a hard look at it and ask yourself “Is it worth it?”

    The time has come to approach nonprofit marketing with ruthless rigor. If you’re not already, you should ask yourself with every project—is the time and investment spent here a smart use of my limited resources? If you can look at that time calculation and make the case that it’s worth it, keep on trucking. If not, take steps to be more efficient.

    What’s the point?

    Every communications piece should be connected to a goal—the more specific the better. And the newsletter is no exception. You probably have several important goals for your newsletter—keeping your donors up-to-date, communicating impact, telling stories, putting a face to volunteers, showcasing exciting new programs, etc. And you 100% should keep in touch with your supporters, especially before fundraising asks. But take a step back and ask yourself, “is this newsletter in its current form the best way to achieve these goals?”

    Who do we want to read this piece?

    Knowing your audience is key. Ask yourself, who is our primary audience for our newsletter and what are they looking for? If you’re not sure, ask them. A simple survey to newsletter subscribers can go a long way. When it comes to communication, personalization matters. A recent study by Abila about donor loyalty reports that approximately 71 percent of donors feel more engaged with a nonprofit when they receive content that’s personalized to them. Investing all of your efforts on one-size-fits all newsletter may not be the right approach.

    What content do we need to deliver?

    We live in an age where good content matters. In that same study cited above, nearly 75 percent of donors say they might stop donating to an organization based on poor content, including vague, dull, or irrelevant content, and inconvenient formatting. With that in mind, your communications team should be in the habit of regularly developing content that will resonate with your audiences and assessing what channel is best for that content to be delivered. Maybe that one-size-fits-all monthly enews that takes weeks to assemble could be scrapped in place of shorter, more regular email updates or Facebook posts. Or perhaps you can build up your blog and treat your enews as a simple round-up of what you’ve already developed, segmented by audience type and emailing content to people in more targeted ways.

    Think through first what content you really need to deliver, and then put pressure on whether your newsletter is the best format to deliver it. (Need help? Check our Sarah Durham’s content planning and management workshop coming up this summer.)

    What does the data say?

    If you aren’t already, you should be keeping a close eye on how your enewsletter is performing. Try comparing your open rates and click-through rates to industry averages using M&R’s 2017 e-benchmarks. If your enewsletter is performing at or below average, there’s probably a good case to be made to approach it with fresh eyes.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Coinigy Adds Users, As Digital Currency Values Soar
    By Jeff Buchanan - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Matt Cohler, a general partner with the Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm Benchmark, in 2014 described to Vanity Fair his view of the smartphone as a “remote control for real life.” Cohler’s analogy captures a key feature of so many digital innovations, from the earliest remote controls to today’s smartphones: being able to take lots […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • The Decline of the Baronial C.E.O.
    By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    Corporate giants once had all-powerful chiefs with domains to match. But activist investors and technological change are remaking the executive suite.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Analysts Hedge Snap, Inc. Revenue Forecasts
    Tuesday Feb 28, 2017

    Ahead of Snap's big IPO, Wieser isn't the only one questioning the company's growth potential. As "Business Insider" reported, this week, Snap executives have been peppered with questions aboutcompetition from Facebook, user growth for the disappearing-message app, and accessibility in less developed markets.

    Source: Media Post: Mobile Insider