bari li zhao development, LLC

120 bay ridge avenue
brooklyn, new york 11220

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JULY 02, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4425742

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - BARI LI ZHAO DEVELOPMENT, LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Your #GivingTuesday To-Do List
    Wednesday Nov 2, 2016

    #GivingTuesday is less than one month away! [That’s Tuesday, November 29th, in case you missed it!] I’m already getting emails and tweets reminding me to “save the date”... are you ready?

    Earlier this week, Daniel and I shared some tips for how to maximize #GivingTuesday with the finalists of the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s Spark Prize, who will each receive a match of up to $5,000 for their donations. This is part of their new local giving campaign, Brooklyn Gives, created to encourage Brooklyn residents and small businesses to come together to support some of Brooklyn’s most outstanding community-based nonprofits.

    As part of the training, we offered a week-by-week list of how to plan #GivingTuesday. So if you still haven’t started your preparations, don’t fret. There’s still time and lots of hope!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • LA Home to Equality Seekers
    Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

    Top 10 DMAs in which adults say equality for all is extremely important to them.

    1. Los Angeles, CA
    2. New York, NY
    3. Miami – Ft. Lauderdale, FL
    4. Detroit, MI
    5. El Paso (Las Cruces), TX-NM
    6. Davenport – Rock Island – Moline, IA-IL
    7. Monterey – Salinas, CA
    8. Tampa – St. Petersburg(Sarasota), FL
    9. San Francisco – Oakland – San Jose, CA

    10. Tucson (Sierra Vista), AZ

    Source: GfK MRI’s 2011 Market-by-Market Study

    This brief initially appeared in MarketingDaily on December 7.

    Source: Media Post: MAD LA
  • Cyclist Killed by Bus in New York’s First Citi Bike Fatality
    By MATTHEW HAAG and HANNAH ALANI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Dan Hanegby of Brooklyn fell under a bus’s tires in Chelsea. He worked for Credit Suisse and was once the top-ranked tennis player in Israel.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • The High Value of Your Nonprofit’s Values
    Wednesday Jan 25, 2017

    I was delighted to participate as a steering committee in the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s inaugural Spark Prize, an exciting new grantmaking initiative. I was truly impressed with how the Foundation integrated its values into every aspect of this project and leveraged them as a strategic decision-making tool in the grant review process, so I asked their fabulous DIrector of Communications, Liane Stegmaier, to write about it.  - Sarah Durham

    This month, Brooklyn Community Foundation marks the third anniversary of Brooklyn Insights—an extensive Brooklyn-wide community engagement project launched shortly after our President Cecilia Clarke joined the Foundation, which ultimately produced a bold grantmaking strategy that has since garnered national recognition.

    And coincidentally, on this anniversary we are announcing the recipients of our new Spark Prize—one of the Foundation’s highest-profile grantmaking efforts to date, awarding 5 outstanding Brooklyn nonprofits with no-strings-attached grants of $100,000 each in recognition of their service to Brooklyn, commitment to equity and justice, strong organizational values, and dynamic vision for the future.

    While we’re often asked about the major themes surfaced through our 1,000-plus Brooklyn Insights’ community conversations, the core grantmaking strategies we’ve since focused on, or our new institution-wide Racial Justice Lens—in this blog, we’re going to focus on the set of values that emerged during Brooklyn Insights that not only helped the Foundation determine our new direction, but continue to guide us and inform new initiatives like the Spark Prize.

    Of course, we knew three years ago that creating a community-led strategy might also lead us to change our mission statement and vision. But what we didn’t fully appreciate at the time was that while mission and vision are critical for moving us forward, strong institutional values are necessary to define who we are as an institution and how we hold ourselves accountable to these pursuits each and every day.

    Over the six months of listening to Brooklynites tell us about the challenges they faced in their communities, the opportunities they saw for change, and the roles we as their Community Foundation could play, we also heard loud and clear a call for us to be a different kind of institution: one that wears its values on its sleeve, keeps the doors open, and always positions community voices at the fore of its work.

    This call led us to articulate five new values for Brooklyn Community Foundation:

    • Courage. We believe in fearlessly identifying barriers to change and we fight for solutions that help overcome injustice.

    • Creativity. We believe that the power of imagination is greater than the challenges we face. We celebrate what works. We pursue the new. We learn as much from failure as we do from success.

    • Honesty. We are committed to being open and trustworthy in all we do and seek partners who share our values.

    • Collaboration. We believe in creating solutions together, harnessing the diversity of Brooklyn, and partnering with the community to spark change and produce results.

    • Respect. We believe in every resident’s dignity and basic human rights, and honor diversity of race, gender and background.

    We’ve come to refer to these values at every test in our decision-making, we talk about them in our Board meetings, staff meetings, and annual staff reviews, and they’ve informed our ongoing racial justice and equity trainings.

    And with the new Spark Prize, we are spotlighting the importance of strong values, and celebrating 5 Brooklyn nonprofits for their exemplary values-driven work. The first-ever recipients of the Spark Prize are Audre Lorde Project, Common Justice, Make the Road New York, MoCADA, and Neighbors Together.

    A committee of approximately 30 Brooklyn civic, business and philanthropic leaders (including Big Duck’s own Sarah Durham!) selected the 5 organizations from an applicant pool of over 150. They were chosen on the basis of a 1,000 word essay, followed by in person interviews where each spoke to the role their values play in their organization and how they align with the Foundation’s values.

    In their application, Audre Lorde Project stated that their values are rooted in transparency, wellness, transformation, cultural work and coalition building. “Collaboration with other social justice organizations is central to ALP’s intersectional, movement-building work.”

    Make the Road wrote that their values are why their 19,000+ members shape all of their campaigns: “Our youth challenge oppression by naming the disparate treatment of black and brown, LGBTQ and immigrant young people …. Their passionate advocacy has resulted in huge movement victories.”

    MoCADA isa museum founded on principles of justice, equity, and inclusion….courage, creativity and collaboration are the key elements of our mission, vision and values.”

    Neighbors Together’s work isgrounded in our belief in the dignity and potential of each person to be a vital part of creating a more just society” and its members have the courage “to fight for real and lasting solutions to overcome injustice.”

    And last but not least, Common Justice highlighted each of their values in their application—demonstrating a deep connection between their values and the unique nature of their healing work between victims and perpetrators of violence:

    • Accountability. We are responsible for our actions, our words, our power, and our impacts. We know that accountability affirms the dignity and humanity both of those responsible and of those harmed, and we hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold others. 

    • Transparency. We are transparent about our actions, our intentions, our options, and our decisions. We communicate with clarity and consistency with those impacted by what we do. 

    • Transformation. We believe in the potential of all human beings to transform, heal, grow, change, and be resilient. We believe we all deserve individuals, communities, and institutions that support us in being our best selves. 

    • Respect. We believe in the inherent worth, importance, rights, culture, and strengths of all people, and work to reflect and honor that in the way we behave toward others. 

    • Purpose. We uphold the responsibilities and boundaries of our work because we are ambitious, hopeful, and outcomes-driven. 

    These 5 values send a powerful message, and are a primary reason Common Justice is receiving the Spark Prize in our inaugural year.

    As nonprofit communicators, we are all very familiar with the adage “Show, Don’t Tell.”

    Mission tells us what you do; values show who you are.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • The Must-Do First Step in Creating a Profitable Fundraising Plan
    By Gail Perry - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    A fundraising assessment. A development office audit. A SWOT of your fundraising program.

    What are these things?

    They're the first step to creating a killer fundraising strategy that can unlock your fundraising potential.

    No kidding.

    Before you can create a strategy and a plan of execution, you have to step back and assess where you are.

    This is time to calmly, dispassionately take stock, examine what you have to work with, and evaluate how well things are working.

    A fundraising assessment gives you the opportunity to look at your fundraising program analytically.

    Without emotion. Without drama. No more crisis mode fundraising!

    A Fundraising Assessment can tell you a lot.

    • You can identify current successes and where you can build them up.
    • You can identify where the easy money might be that you are missing.
    • You can identify unproductive time wasters like certain fundraising events, that are not worth the trouble.

    5 Steps to a Thoughtful Fundraising Assessment

    1. Pull together your data.

    What does your data tell you?

    What are the trends?

    How about the numbers of current donors  - are they trending up or down?

    How about your donor renewal rates and donor attrition?

    Event attendees? How about the number of donors in your annual gift clubs?

    What about major gifts? Are you tracking Major Gift visits and asks?

    You know what I love about data? The numbers don't really lie. They are pretty straightforward, in black and white.

    Always start with the data when you want to make a plan. 

    2. Ask the tough questions.

    When you do a fundraising assessment you have permission to ask politically awkward questions.

    You can ask Cage Rattling Questions like:

    Can we be honest about what's working and what's not working?

    Are we wiling to ditch unproductive programs?

    You can get an entire list of "tough questions" to ask about your fundraising strategy in last week's post here.

    3. Assess each fundraising program's current results.

    Review all your various fundraising programs - mailings, events, major gifts, grants, corporate and foundation support, digital strategies. What results are you getting?

    • What's working well? What's working not so well?
    • What trends are on the rise?
    • What strategies are not paying off like they used to?

    You should be able to see where your opportunities might be if you shift your focus.

    You might be able to add resources somewhere and receive a significant jump up in revenue.

    Don't forget to assess other aspects that impact your fundraising success:

    It can be fun - and enlightening - to step back and evaluate everything.  Include your board in this discussion! 

    4. Identify your fundraising challenges.

    Yes, challenges are a part of life.

    If you want to know how much you can raise, you must be willing to acknowledge what's not working so well.

    • Are there people who are impediments to good fundraising?
    • What's NOT working? Where are you wasting time?
    • Are you losing too many donors each year?
    • Have you cut your fundraising budget and staff but not your fundraising expectations?
    • Is your staff totally run ragged?
    • Is your signature event losing steam?

    Just be realistic.

    Please.

    Wistful thinking is not going to raise your money!

    Being realistic will lead to smart decisions and planning.

    Being realistic will help you sleep at night too.

    Always try to turn your challenges into your opportunities!

    5. Identify your fundraising opportunities.

    Every organization has special opportunities. What are yours?

    Perhaps you have:

    • A great location in town.
    • A cause that is suddenly very popular.
    • Were you recently in the news?
    • A very popular gala or event.
    • A new CEO or leader.
    • New internet or social media talent joining your team.
    • Is your board suddenly interested in helping?

    Take a look around. You might find some surprises you can play up and run with.

    Sometimes amazing results can happen by building on opportunities.

    Can you form a coalition? Can you build on key relationships?

    Be alert. Be strategic. Be opportunistic, even.

    Maybe a key relationship can offer opportunities to catapult your organization to a whole new level.

    Pull it all together in your Fundraising Assessment.

    • How effective is our current fundraising plan?
    • Where can we increase your fundraising revenue streams?
    • Where do we need to focus time, energy and resources?
    • Where can we increase our efficiency?

    Bottom Line: What's holding YOU back from raising big money?

    I can help you answer these questions with my Highly Profitable Fundraising Planning Toolkit.

    You have a template to perform your own SWOT and Fundraising Assessment of your own program.

    You'll have a 10-Point set of checklists to help you determine where your best opportunities are.

    I'll help you step back from the weeds and look at how you can raise money in new and better ways.

    When you create a smart, strategic Fundraising Plan for the coming year, you'll be organized. You'll be happier. And your organization will raise more money!

    QUESTION: what are your challenges with your own Fundraising Assessment?

    Leave a comment and let us know!

     

    The post The Must-Do First Step in Creating a Profitable Fundraising Plan appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry
  • Mid-Level Donors = Low Hanging Fruit?
    By Gail Perry - Friday Apr 7, 2017

    Mid-Level Donors.

    We're all talking about these lovely folks in your data base who are already giving significantly - and the potential they offer.

    But what to do with them, when you are already practically burdened by too much to do??

    Today, here's a clear 5-step plan upgrade your mid-donors and take them to new giving heights.

    We'll follow the basic, fundamental principles of fundraising:

    • Know who to ask.
    • Know their interest in what you do.
    • Have a compelling case for your work.
    • Make an ask for a specific amount.
    • Meaningful acknowledgement and appreciation of their support.

    And we'll apply these fundamentals to the “middle donors” in your database who have capacity to give more.

    Here are five steps to start transforming your mid-level donors into major gift donors.

    1. Good Data and Segmentation.

    All good fundraising starts or stops here - with your data.

    You need good reports and information about donors in your database records.

    If you can’t create reports and segment your donors by first gift, last gift, largest gift, and cumulative giving, stop what you are doing today and fix your data management (Email us, we can help).

    WHO are your mid-level donors?

    Look on your reports for where your donors tend to group. It could be $100-$200, $500-$1,000, or higher.

    Identify your mid-donor range and start reviewing your lists for capacity.

    Look for:

    • Cumulative giving (Indicates level of commitment to the organization)
    • Largest gift (for example, $100 every year but 4 years ago gave $1,200)
    • Other simple research to ID giving potential:
      • Gifts to other organizations
      • Political giving (opensecrets.org)
      • Home value (zwillow.com)

    One of the best investments you can make is to bring in a create a college intern or a volunteer to help research donors.

    I’ve done this multiple times and they discovered invaluable information that was so helpful.

    2. Know Your Mid-Level Donors.

    Try these steps:

    • Start with the top donors - the highest identified capacity.
    • Work your way down the list.
    • Set aside time every week for calls and meetings to say thank you.
    • Ask them: “Why do you support our organization?”

    This simple question will start to tell you how to move your $100 donor to $1,000, your $500 donor to $5,000, and up. Maybe use a volunteer to make thank you phone calls to them.

    Be sure to record the info a donor shares in their database record.

    That information gives you the basis create a solicitation plan - either one-on-one cultivation, or an upgrade appeal letter.

    You choose.

    But do make a plan for each capacity donor that will lead to a either an in-person or an appeal Ask.

    3. Ask Organizational Questions

    Before you create a plan to upgrade middle donors, ask these important questions internally:

    • What would our organization do with additional revenue?
    • What mission objectives will be achieved?
    • How will it appeal to the reasons donors have shared about why they support our organization?

    The answers to these questions will guide all of your communications and all the upgrade appeals you send to middle donors.

    Of course, you must be specific when ask for an upgrade.

    So you let donors know what your organization wants to accomplish, how much it will cost, and how their gift at a certain level will make a difference. 

    4. Create a Project Plan for Mid-Level Donors.

    Now you have:

    • Data that outlines your mid-donor potential,
    • Feedback from the donors themselves,
    • Some research on your top identified prospects.

    NOW . . . . . it’s time for a PLAN.

    It's time to start treating your middle donors like major donors and upgrade their giving.

    A basic plan for ANY Mid-Level Donor Program.

    1. Assign top mid-level prospects for one-on-one cultivation and solicitation.

    2. Review your data often on your mid-donor segments. (there's always "juicy" potential there!)

    3. Send customized communications and upgrade appeals. Send them to segmented donor groups based on steps 2 and 3 above.

    4. Create a new mid-level donor recognition program, or expand your existing giving society to include these donors. Then it's easy to give them special communications, recognition at events, include them in special publications and on website, etc.

    5. Find a Matching Gift to help launch your mid-donor program.  A matching gift is easy to solicit.  Donors love seeing their gift multiplied!

    5. Work the Plan and Manage Your Time.

    Prioritize time for you and your team to execute your mid-donor plan.

    To stay organized, I create a weekly work plan that includes the priority tasks to execute all annual development plan activities that must be done.

    Anything else that needs to get done that week will have to fit in the open time, or it gets moved back. (You can do this, right??)

    Don’t let the busy get in the way of the necessary.

    Keep an eye on use of staff time and ROI for your middle donor efforts.

    If you can create and effectively manage this kind of plan, it can have a major impact on what your organization can achieve overall.

    You'll develop closer relationships and retention of these important middle donors.

    AND you'll expand your major gift prospect pipeline and gifts.

    Bottom Line: What is your middle donor success story? Let us hear what’s worked for you.

    Need help planning and implementing a mid-level donor program? Email us, we can help.

    This is a guest post by our new fabulous new Fired-Up Fundraising colleague, Dan Bruer.

    Dan Bruer has over 18 years experience in fundraising and nonprofit management, developing and leading comprehensive fundraising programs and capital campaigns for regional and national non-profit organizations and universities, including University of Missouri-Columbia, UNC-Chapel Hill, American Red Cross, and major national conservation organizations. He specializes in major gift and midlevel donor programs. We are thrilled to welcome him to our team.

    The post Mid-Level Donors = Low Hanging Fruit? appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry