asset awareness agency, inc.

3480 b hampton rd.
oceanside, new york 11572

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
FEBRUARY 21, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4363581

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - ASSET AWARENESS AGENCY, INC.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • New York City and James Blake Resolve Excessive-Force Claim
    By BENJAMIN MUELLER - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    As part of the deal with the former pro tennis player, the city will create a new position within the agency that investigates police misconduct.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Food & Wine Magazine Will Leave New York for Alabama
    By STEPHANIE STROM - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    The move reflects a changing business in which traditional food magazines, and a Manhattan address, are less important.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • China Will Be Part of a Popular Stock Index, Opening the Door to Foreign Money
    By KEITH BRADSHER and ALEXANDRA STEVENSON - Wednesday Jun 21, 2017

    Inclusion in MSCI’s emerging markets index, even on a modest scale, will make it more important for foreign money managers to invest in China.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • BIZ DEV: Fallon Appointed Culligan's First National AOR
    Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Water filtration company Culligan has selected Publicis Groupe’s Fallon for AOR duties. The appointment is said to be the client’s first national creative and media AOR. 

    Theselection came after a formal review that included four other undisclosed agencies.

    The Minneapolis-based agency will manage media planning and buying, strategy and creative for thebusiness. 

    Fallon is tasked with bringing awareness to Culligan’s service in water softening and filtration. The assignment is effective immediately and the agency’s firstwork will launch in early 2018 across TV, digital and print. 

    “We were immediately impressed by Fallon’s branding chops and strong understanding of our franchise model,”stated Larry Holzman, Culligan Senior Vice President, North American Franchise. “ The cross-disciplinary team showed us a world of possibilities for the brand that can truly advance our brandposition.” 

    Headquartered in Rosemont, IL, Culligan was founded in 1936 and is well known for iconic “Hey Culligan Man!” campaign that began on radio in the 1950s andran for several decades. The firm’s network of franchisees includes more than 800 dealers in 90 countries. 

    For Fallon the win follows last month’s decision by H&R Blockto expand its relationship with the agency, adding media planning and social strategy to its creative assignment.

    Source: Media Post: Social Media & Marketing Daily
  • The elusive millennials: are they worth chasing?
    Monday Dec 5, 2016

    Ah, millennials—they’re the constantly SnapChatting young people with attention spans that shorten every day. (I’m allowed to say this because I’m one of them!) As millennials make up more and more of the workforce and their buying power increases, organizations are obsessing about how to get them to care about their cause—and ultimately how to get them to give.

    This obsession has led to tons of research about the generation, and after doing a little digging, I noticed that the research doesn’t always match up. For instance, MobileCause said millennials give to causes, rather than specific organizations or brands, but Inc. 500 found millennials to be extremely brand loyal compared to other generations.

    So what’s the deal? Do millennials care about a specific organization or not? And how does that affect their likelihood to give? Big Duck’s new market research tool, the Brandraising Benchmark, also digs into questions like these, and our June survey returned some interesting results about young people:

    1. 18-34 year olds had some of the highest levels of awareness of participating organizations. This means they were more likely than other, older age groups to claim that they’d heard of a participating organization. This was true for nonprofits large and small, and across a variety of sectors.
    2. When asked about the importance of participating organizations’ mission statements, 18-34 year olds were more likely than any other age group to say the mission was very or extremely important. Again, true for nonprofits of all sizes and a variety of sectors.
    3. When asked about their likelihood to donate in the future, 18-34 year olds were more likely than all other age groups to say they probably or definitely would donate. Again, true for organizations large and small, and across sectors.

    So perhaps all the obsession over millennials is warranted: they’re aware of what’s going on in the nonprofit sector and excited about donating. What’s more, they seem to be aware of specific organizations (not just the issues behind them), so they may pay more attention to your brand than you might expect.

    My biggest takeaway about all of this is that developing a brand that inspires connection is more important than ever. Think Nike or Old Spice, and think fast because this age group has a lot of organizations vying for their attention.

    If you want to know what millennials (and other demographics) think of your organization specifically, sign up for our Brandraising Benchmark.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • UCLA Olympic lab penalized by world drug agency
    By AP - By AP - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    UCLA Olympic lab gets 3-month partial suspension of accreditation by World Anti-Doping Agency 

    Source: USA Today: Olympics
  • Are you top of mind? Three types of awareness you should be tracking
    Tuesday Dec 13, 2016

    Most nonprofits strive to increase their own visibility through their marketing and communications efforts, but few actually track if it’s working.  When we launched the Brandraising Benchmark in 2016 to help nonprofits track their own levels of awareness and engagement cost-effectively, our partners at Ipsos were full of valuable insights. In this article, Nicole Zacotinsky, an account manager at Ipsos, sheds light on three types of awareness worth considering. - Sarah.

    What is awareness and why is it important to measure?

    Whether or not people are aware of you is the foundation for any type of interaction with your organization. Measuring your awareness tells you where you stand, and repeating that measurement over time will tell you if your organization is increasing its awareness, decreasing it, or if it’s stagnant. 

    In order to understand a brand’s awareness, it needs to be measured with some type of frequency (monthly, yearly, bi-yearly, etc.). Your initial measurement becomes your benchmark or baseline, and as long as it’s measured in a similar manner (same questions among the same population) at the frequency you’ve determined, then upticks or downticks in awareness will show any impact your organization is having.

    There will always be some “ghost awareness” (a % who claim awareness but aren’t actually aware) to some degree; however it is expected that the ghost awareness will remain consistent year on year. Therefore, the change in awareness year on year is much more important than a baseline awareness number and changes up or down in awareness trends that are are perceived to be real.

    There are three types of awareness

    There are three different types of awareness. There is prompted awareness: when asked, people tell you they know the organization when picking them off a list. There is unprompted awareness: when asked, people come up with the organization on their own without having to look at a list to say “Oh yeah, I know them.” And, as a subset of unprompted awareness, we have top of mind, meaning that when asked it is the first brand people tell you unprompted. The more you can get your target audience to come up with your organization’s name unprompted, the deeper the individual’s connection is to your organization. Being top of mind makes that connection even deeper. Brand awareness is important because the faster your nonprofit comes to mind, the easier it is to remember what it stands for and for a person to take action or donate.

    What do I do with my awareness measurement?

    The more your organization is able to put their name out there and drive awareness, the more your target population will show interest. You can put your organization’s name out there through social media buys, blog posts, and social events. A great example of this is ALS and the ice bucket challenge. They were able to raise $220 million in a year through a viral social media efforts. However you do it, ultimately the goal is to give them a reason to increase their share of wallet (donations) to you rather than another organization.

    Interested in benchmarking your nonprofit’s prompted awareness? Big Duck’s upcoming Brandraising Benchmarks are all online here.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Soupman Inc. of 'Seinfeld' Fame Seeks Bankruptcy Protection
    Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Soupman Inc., of “Seinfeld” fame, filed for bankruptcy protection Tuesday, just weeks after a top company executive was charged with tax evasion.

    Source: The Wall Street Journal: U.S. Business