arl architecture and engineering, d.p.c.

424 new york ave.
huntington, new york 11743

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JUNE 16, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4592536

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC PROFESSIONAL CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - ARL ARCHITECTURE AND ENGINEERING, D.P.C.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Does Electroconvulsive Therapy Improve Huntington’s Disease?
    Wednesday Jul 19, 2017

    For over 70 years Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) has been used to treat severe depression and there are reports that it could help patients with Huntington’s Disease who experience psychiatric symptoms. Many patients with Huntington’s Disease experience depression, with suicide rates 5 to 10 times higher than the general public. In 21 published case reports where -

    Source: The Doctor's Channel
  • MSH3 Gene Reveals Critical Link With Huntington’s Disease
    Wednesday Aug 9, 2017

    A recent study published in Lancet Neurology reveals important associations between MSH3 gene mutations and Huntington’s disease progression and disease burden.

    Source: The Doctor's Channel
  • Neighborhoods That Play Hard to Get
    By STEFANOS CHEN - Friday Aug 11, 2017

    In some New York neighborhoods, the housing stock is great, but turnover is so low, word of mouth is the best search engine.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Could the Rockaways Survive Another Sandy?
    By LUIS FERRÉ-SADURNÍ - Thursday Jul 13, 2017

    Residents are bracing for the worst, wondering whether measures taken so far are enough to keep devastation of the Queens community at bay.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Like a cut-and-paste tool, gene editing transforms research
    By LAURAN NEERGAARD, AP Medical Writer - Wednesday Aug 2, 2017

    There are several gene editing methods, but a tool called CRISPR-Cas9 has sparked a boom in research as laboratories worldwide adopted it over the past five years because it's faster, cheaper, simple to use with minimal training and allows manipulation of multiple genes at the same time.In laboratory experiments, a team lead by Oregon researchers used CRISPR to successfully repair a heart-damaging gene in human embryos, marking a step toward one day being able to prevent inherited diseases from being passed on to the next generation.The biggest everyday use of CRISPR so far is to engineer animals with human-like disorders for basic research, such as learning how genes cause disease or influence development and what therapies might help.[...] promising research, in labs and animals so far, also suggests gene editing might lead to treatments for such diseases as sickle cell, cancer, maybe Huntington's — by altering cells and returning them to the body.[...] it's ethically charged because future generations couldn't consent, any long-term negative effects might not become apparent for years, and there's concern about babies designed with enhanced traits rather than to prevent disease.Earlier this year, an ethics report from the prestigious National Academy of Sciences opened the door to lab research to figure out how to make such changes — but said if germline editing ever is allowed, it should be reserved for serious diseases with no good alternatives and performed under rigorous oversight.Any attempt to study germline editing in pregnant women would require permission from the Food and Drug Administration, which is currently prohibited by Congress from reviewing any such request.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
arl architecture and engineering dpc huntington ny