apple 6 LLC

58-03 calloway st apt 4b
elmhurst, new york 11373

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
JANUARY 08, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4510088

County
QUEENS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
MICHAEL ARIS
58-03 CALLOWAY ST APT 4B
ELMHURST, NEW YORK, 11373-7701

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - APPLE 6 LLC









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Website
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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • NY couple 'enslaved' South Korean kids for 6 years: DA
    By foxnewsonline@foxnews.com (Fox News Online) - Thursday Jul 20, 2017

    Source: Fox News
  • Hey glassholes: Apple just bought an eye-tracking company
    By Adario Strange - Monday Jun 26, 2017

    Apple's attempts to hide the development of secret new products by using shell companies usually works, but some clever sleuthing by one site has revealed what may be a key component of Apple's future with augmented reality

    Documents have been uncovered by MacRumors that indicate Apple has quietly acquired eye-tracking company SensoMotoric Instruments. In addition to tracking down acquisition documents linked to Apple attorney Gene Levoff, the site also spoke to an anonymous tipster in contact with an Apple employee who confirmed the acquisition.  Read more...

    More about Apple, Virtual Reality, Vr, Augmented Reality, and Ar

    Source: Mashable!
  • Guy remade the upcoming 'Star Wars' trailer using only an 1984 Apple computer
    By Yvette Tan - Tuesday Jun 27, 2017

    If Star Wars: The Last Jedi were a retro video game, we imagine it'd look a lot like this.

    Indonesian illustrator Wahyu Ichwandardi made it his mission to remake the upcoming Star Wars trailer using only an Apple llc from 1984.

    Ichwandardi, who is based in New York, painstakingly drew his tribute on a KoalaPad from the '80s, using a 1984 bitmap paint program, Dazzle Draw.

    In the '80s, the setup was deemed the "most complete computer graphics system," but it's clear from his process how far we've come.

    For instance, in order to draw in layers for the animation, the illustrator had to draw each layer by hand, using plastic sheets held over the monitor, to trace each frame from the trailer, for reference. Read more...

    More about Apple, Star Wars, Indonesia, Movie Trailer, and Graphics

    Source: Mashable!
  • Report Reveals In-App Purchase Scams in the App Store
    By Tim Hardwick - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    An investigation into App Store developer pay-outs has uncovered a scamming trend in which apps advertising fake services are making thousands of dollars a month from in-app purchases.

    In a Medium article titled How to Make $80,000 Per Month on the Apple App Store, Johnny Lin describes how he discovered the trend, which works by manipulating search ads to promote dubious apps in the App Store and then preys on unsuspecting users via the in-app purchase mechanism.

    I scrolled down the list in the Productivity category and saw apps from well-known companies like Dropbox, Evernote, and Microsoft. That was to be expected. But what's this? The #10 Top Grossing Productivity app (as of June 7th, 2017) was an app called "Mobile protection :Clean & Security VPN".

    Given the terrible title of this app (inconsistent capitalization, misplaced colon, and grammatically nonsensical "Clean & Security VPN?"), I was sure this was a bug in the rankings algorithm. So I check Sensor Tower for an estimate of the app's revenue, which showed… $80,000 per month?? That couldn't possibly be right. Now I was really curious.
    To learn how this could be, Lin installed and ran the app, and was soon prompted to start a "free trial" for an "anti-virus scanner" (iOS does not need anti-virus software thanks to Apple's sandboxing rules for individual apps). Tapping on the trial offer then threw up a Touch ID authentication prompt containing the text "You will pay $99.99 for a 7-day subscription starting Jun 9, 2017".


    Lin was one touch away from paying $400 a month for a non-existent service offered by a scammer.
    It suddenly made a lot of sense how this app generates $80,000 a month. At $400/month per subscriber, it only needs to scam 200 people to make $80,000/month, or $960,000 a year. Of that amount, Apple takes 30%, or $288,000?—?from just this one app.
    Lin went on to explain how dishonorable developers are able to take advantage of Apple's App Store search ads product because there's no filtering or approval process involved. Not only that, ads look almost indistinguishable from real results in the store, while some ads take up the entire search result's first page.

    Lin dug deeper and found several other similar apps making money off the same scam, suggesting a wider disturbing trend, with scam apps regularly showing up in the App Store's top grossing lists.

    It's unclear at this point how these apps managed to make it onto the App Store in the first place given Apple's usually stringent approval process, or whether changes to the search ads system in iOS 11 will prevent this immoral practice from occurring in future. We'll be sure to update this article if we hear more from Apple.

    In the meantime, users should report scam apps when they see them and inform less savvy friends of this scamming trend until something is done to eradicate it.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • Changes to iCloud Put Apple on Collision Course With Governments Seeking Access to Encrypted Messages
    By Tim Hardwick - Thursday Jul 20, 2017

    Apple has sent its top privacy executives to Australia twice in the past month to lobby government officials over proposed new laws that would require companies to provide access to encrypted messages.

    According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Apple privacy advocates met with attorney general George Brandis and senior staff in Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull's office on Tuesday to discuss their concerns about the legal changes, which could compel tech companies to provide decryption keys to allow access to secure communications such as that provided by WhatsApp and iMessage.

    Apple has consistently argued against laws that would require tech companies to build so-called "back doors" into their software, claiming that such a move would weaken security for everyone and simply make terrorists and criminals turn to open-source encryption methods for their digital communications.

    While Apple's position is clear, the Turnbull government has yet to clarify exactly what it expects tech companies to give up as part of the proposals. A source familiar with the discussions said that the government explicitly said it did not want a back door into people's phones, nor to weaken encryption.

    However, given that encrypted services like WhatsApp and iMessage do not possess private keys that would enable them to decrypt messages, a back door would seem the only alternative. "If the government laid a subpoena to get iMessages, we can't provide it," CEO Tim Cook said in 2014. "It's encrypted and we don't have a key."

    As it happens, Cook's comment only applies to iMessages that aren't backed up to the cloud: Apple doesn't have access to messages sent between devices because they're end-to-end encrypted, but if iCloud Backup is enabled those messages are encrypted on Apple's servers using an encryption key that the company has access to and could potentially provide to authorities.

    However, Apple is moving in the same direction as WhatsApp and Telegram to make encryption keys entirely private. As announced at WWDC in June, macOS High Sierra and iOS 11 will synchronize iMessages across devices signed into the same account using iCloud and a new encryption method that ensures the keys stay out of Apple's hands.

    As senior VP of software Craig Federighi noted in interview with Daring Fireball's John Gruber, even if users store information in the cloud, "it's encrypted with keys that Apple doesn't have. And so they can put things in the cloud, they can pull stuff down from the cloud, so the cloud still serves as a conduit — and even ultimately a kind of a backup for them — but only they can read it."

    How this will play out in Apple's discussions with the Australian government – and indeed other governments in the "Five Eyes" intelligence sharing network seeking similar access to encrypted communications – is anything but clear. According to sources, Apple and the Turnbull government are taking a collaborative approach in the discussions, but previous statements by officials imply a tougher stance behind the scenes.

    Last week, Senator Brandis said the Australian government would work with companies such as Apple to facilitate greater access to secure communications, but warned that "we'll also ensure that the appropriate legal powers, if need be, as a last resort, coercive powers of the kind that recently were introduced into the United Kingdom under the Investigatory Powers Act... are available to Australian intelligence and law enforcement authorities as well".

    Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.


    Discuss this article in our forums

    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
  • What Is Apple Blotch Fungus: Tips For Treating Apple Tree Fungus
    By Kristi Waterworth - Sunday Jun 4, 2017

    Source: Gardening Know How
apple 6 llc elmhurst ny