american trade & goods inc

1213 loudon road
cohoes, new york 12047

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 15, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4388659

County
SARATOGA

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - AMERICAN TRADE & GOODS INC









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