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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Needham Joins Final Nike/USL HSG Top 25 With Upset of Longmeadow
    By mschneider - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    In the final in-season update of the Nike/US Lacrosse High School Girls Top 25, three teams found new spots at the bottom of the pack.

    Thanks to Needham (Mass.) upsetting previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game to jump in at No. 22, Archbishop Carroll (Pa.), the PIAA 3A champion, moved up two spots, while Bayport-Blue Point (N.Y.) dropped just one.

    Skip to: National | Northeast | Mid-Atlantic | South | Midwest | West
    Category: 
    High School
    Author: 
    Laurel Pfahler
    Body Section One: 

    National Top 25

     
    June 20, 2017

    W/L

    Prev

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    1 McDonogh (Md.) 22-0 1 Season complete (IAAM champion) 2 Garden City (N.Y.) 20-1 2 Season complete (Class B champion) 3 Glenelg (Md.) 20-0 3 Season complete (Maryland 3A/2A champion) 4 Notre Dame Prep (Md.) 19-3 4 Season complete (IAAM runner-up) 5 Mount Sinai (N.Y.) 18-2 5 Season complete (Class C champion) 6 Bridgewater-Raritan (N.J.) 22-1 6 Season complete (Group 4/TOC winner) 7 Ridgewood (N.J.) 21-1 7 Season complete 8 Bishop Ireton (Va.) 19-5 8 Season complete (WCAC/VISAA champion) 9 St. Stephen's & St. Agnes (Va.) 27-2 9 Season complete (ISL Champion/VISAA runner-up) 10 Darien (Conn.) 20-3 10 Season complete (Class L champion) 11 Pittsford (N.Y.) 20-1 11 Season complete (Class A champion) 12 Middle Country (N.Y.) 18-4 12 Season complete (Class A runner-up) 13 Skaneateles (N.Y.) 18-4 13 Season complete (Class D champion) 14 Milton (Ga.) 17-4 14 Season complete (GHSA 6A/7A champion) 15 Loyola Academy (Ill.) 28-2 15 Season complete (state champion) 16 Oak Knoll (N.J.) 21-5 16 Season complete (NJSIAA Group 1 champion) 17 Summit (N.J.) 19-3 17 Season complete (NJSIAA Group 3 champion) 18 Moorestown (N.J.) 20-3 18 Season complete 19 Christian Brothers (N.Y.) 16-4 19 Season complete 20 Eastport-South Manor (N.Y.) 15-3 20 Season complete 21 Archbishop Carroll (Pa.) 24-1 23 Season complete (PIAA 3A champion) 22 Needham (Mass.) 23-3 NR Season complete (Division I champion) 23 Bayport-Blue Point (N.Y.) 13-4 22 Season complete 24 Agnes Irwin (Pa.) 21-5 24 Season complete (PAISAA champion) 25 Fayetteville-Manlius (N.Y.) 17-4 25 Season complete (Class B runner-up)
    Also considered: Marriotts Ridge (Md.), West Genesee (N.Y.), Shoreham-Wading River (N.Y.), St. Anthony's (N.Y.), Ward Melville (N.Y.), Episcopal Academy (Pa.), Lawrenceville (N.J.), Brighton (N.Y.), Longmeadow (Mass.)
    Quote: 
    Check back to USLaxMagazine.com each Tuesday next year for national and regional rankings and top performers.
    AD Spot: 
    Image Parallax: 
    Body Section Two: 
    Nike/US Lacrosse High School Rankings
    National Boys' Top 25 | National Girls' Top 25
    Northeast Boys' Top 10 | Northeast Girls' Top 10
    Mid-Atlantic Boys' Top 10 | Mid-Atlantic Girls' Top 10
    South Boys' Top 10
    | South Girls' Top 10
    Midwest Boys' Top 10
    | Midwest Girls' Top 10
    West Boys' Top 10
    | West Girls' Top 10

    Northeast Top 10

    1. Garden City (N.Y.), 20-1

    The Trojans claimed their 14th state title in the past 22 years with a 16-8 win over Fayetteville-Manlius (N.Y.) in the Class B championship. Their lone loss was against nationally-ranked Moorestown (N.J.). Previous: 1

    2. Mount Sinai (N.Y.), 18-2

    The Mustangs topped Honeoye Falls-Lima (N.Y.), 15-4, to win their third straight Class C state title. They ended the season on a 15-game winning streak, following early losses to Shoreham-Wading River (N.Y.) and national No. 4 Notre Dame Prep (Md.) by a combined three goals. Previous: 2

    3. Darien (Conn.), 20-3

    The Blue Wave collected their fifth straight Class L state title with a 13-10 win over Wilton (Conn.). Their losses were to national No. 7 Ridgewood (N.J.), No. 2 Garden City and then-ranked Manhasset (N.Y.). Darien has won nine titles the past 10 years. Previous: 3

    4. Pittsford (N.Y.), 20-1

    Sophomore Ellie Mooney scored on a free-position shot just into the start of the second overtime to lift the Panthers to a 10-9 win over Middle Country (N.Y.) in the Class A final for the program’s first state title. Pittsford’s lone loss was to Brighton (N.Y.). Previous: 4

    5. Middle Country (N.Y.), 18-4

    The Wolverines scored two goals in the final minute of regulation to force overtime, but ultimately fell 10-9 in double overtime to Pittsford (N.Y.) in the Class A championship game. Three of their losses were to nationally-ranked opponents. Previous: 5

    6. Skaneateles (N.Y.), 18-4

    The Lakers closed the season with 15 straight wins, capped by a thrilling 12-11 overtime victory over Bronxville (N.Y.) in the Class D state final. Senior Kyla Sears (Princeton) scored her fifth goal with 23 seconds left in the second overtime to lift Skaneateles. Previous: 6

    7. Christian Brothers Academy (N.Y.), 16-4

    The Brothers didn’t get a chance to try to defend their state title after falling 9-7 to eventual champion Pittsford in the Class A semifinals. All four of their losses were against teams that are currently or have been ranked in the top 25 this season. Previous: 7

    8. Eastport-South Manor (N.Y.), 15-3

    E-SM’s season ended with a 12-6 loss to top-ranked Garden City in the Long Island Class B championship game. The Sharks led 6-5 at halftime, but were shut out in the second half. Kaitlyn Dowsett led E-SM with 34 goals and 41 assists this season. Previous: 8

    9. Needham (Mass.), 23-3

    The Rockets raced out to an early 4-1 lead and used strong team defense to secure an 8-5 win over previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game. Sarah Conley and Maeve Barker each finished with two goals and two assists for Needham, which topped Andover (Mass.), 18-8, in the state semifinals. Previous: NR

    10. Bayport-Blue Point (N.Y.), 13-4

    Bayport-Blue Point ended the season with a 9-6 loss to Mount Sinai in the Suffolk County Class C title game last month. Junior midfielder Cassidy Weeks led the Phantoms with 24 goals and 15 assists. Previous: 10

    — Will Cleveland

     

    Mid-Atlantic Top 10 (season complete)

    1. McDonogh (Md.), 22-0

    The Eagles’ unprecedented streak lives on as they finished an eighth straight perfect season with another IAAM title. They beat Notre Dame Prep (Md.), 12-9, in the final May 13 for their 177th consecutive win. Julia Hoffman (Maryland) posted a team-best 55 goals and Maddie Jenner (Duke) added 44 to go along with 165 draw controls. Previous: 1

    2. Glenelg (Md.), 20-0

    The Gladiators were perfect on the way to a repeat Maryland 3A/2A title, finishing with a comfortable win over C.M. Wright (Md.) in the championship May 23. Their résumé included a victory over IAAM power Notre Dame Prep (Md.) and two defeats of rival Marriotts Ridge (Md.). Glenelg put up 319 goals in 20 games this season with Alayna Pagnotta (Jacksonville) scoring a team-high 64 of them and Lindsay LeTellier (Davidson) assisting on 74. Previous: 2

    3. Notre Dame Prep (Md.), 19-3

    The Blazers pushed top-ranked McDonogh twice but couldn’t spring the upset. The second one was a 12-9 loss in the IAAM championship on May 13. Their only other setback came to Glenelg on April 15. Caitlynn Mossman (Boston College) stoked the offense with 46 goals and 46 assists, while goalie Lucy Lowe (Penn State) limited opponents to 6.7 goals per game. Previous: 3

    4. Bridgewater-Raritan (N.J.) 22-1

    Kirsten Murphy’s goal with one minute, 37 seconds left put the Panthers ahead for good in Saturday’s NJSIAA Tournament of Champions final against then-No. 12 Oak Knoll (N.J.). The senior attacker scored four times in the 7-6 win that gave Bridgewater-Raritan its first ToC title. Arielle Weisman made a pair of saves in the final minute to seal the narrow victory, which avenged its only loss of the season. Previous: 4

    5. Ridgewood (N.J.), 21-1

    The Maroons piled up as many impressive wins as anybody this spring, but their unbeaten run abruptly ended with a 10-9 loss to Bridgewater Raritan in the NJSIAA Group 4 semifinals on May 31. Chelsea Trattner (Stanford) and Alex Absey (Columbia) tied for the team lead with 61 goals apiece, while Hannah Cermack (Boston College) posted 47 goals and 44 assists for the most points. Previous: 5

    6. Bishop Ireton (Va.), 19-5

    The Cardinals earned WCAC and Virginia independent school titles, finishing the spring on a 13-game winning streak. They closed with their best victory, dropping St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes (Va.), 9-8 in overtime, on May 21. Madison Mote (Notre Dame) was the offensive catalyst, posting 24 goals and 68 assists for the season. Previous: 6

    7. St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes (Va.), 27-2

    The Saints started the spring with 15 straight wins and later claimed the ISL title, but they came up short in the Virginia independent school tournament. They lost 9-8 to Bishop Ireton in overtime on May 21. A high-scoring attack showed remarkable balance all season with Zoe Belodeau (Penn) leading the way with 115 goals and 55 assists. Previous: 7

    8. Oak Knoll (N.J.), 21-5

    The Royals finished their season Saturday with a 7-6 loss to then-national No. 6 Bridgewater-Raritan in the NJSIAA Tournament of Champions final. They had a couple of chances to tie in a thrilling final minute but couldn’t convert. Ali Baiocco (Stanford) scored once and closed her senior season with 104 goals. Oak Knoll knocked off then-No. 13 Summit, 11-9, on Wednesday to earn its spot in the final. Previous: 8

    9. Summit (N.J.), 19-3

    The Hilltoppers couldn’t land a repeat NJSIAA Tournament of Champions title. They won the Group 3 championship again but fell, 11-9, to then-No. 12 Oak Knoll in a ToC semifinal Wednesday. Summit scored the first four goals of the second half to take the lead before cooling off down the stretch. Helen Johnson (Stanford) and Anna Huntley-Robertson posted two goals apiece in the season-ending setback. Previous: 9

    10.  Moorestown (N.J.), 20-3

    The Quakers battled Summit into the final minute June 3 before falling, 9-8, in the NJSIAA Group 3 championship. Moorestown’s marquee victory in a strong spring came against New York power Garden City. Penn State-bound Quinn Nicolai provided a consistent spark with 60 goals and 28 assists. Previous: 10

    — Eric Detweiler

    Body Section Three: 

    South Top 10 (season complete)

    1. Milton (Ga.), 19-4

    Milton reclaimed the GHSA 6A/7A state championship with a convincing 13-4 win over Cambridge (Ga.). It is the 11th title overall for the Eagles, who finished as the state runner-up last year. Sophie Baez led the team with five goals. Milton reached the title game by handing North Gwinnett its second loss of the season. The Eagles scored the first 11 goals of the game in the 16-3 win, and Lexie Morton finished with five goals, all in the first half, while Hannah Demis added four scores.

    2. Hutchison (Tenn.), 20-1

    The Sting won their seventh consecutive TGLA championship, beating Harpeth Hall (Tenn.) 18-7. Griffin Gearhardt had five goals and two assists, and Elizabeth Farnsworth added four goals, three assists and seven draw controls. Janessa Mai scored three goals. The Sting advanced to the final with a 15-7 win over St. Mary’s in the semifinals. Gearhardt had six goals in that win.

    3. Bishop Moore (Fla.), 20-4

    The Hornets beat St. Thomas Aquinas in double overtime to claim their first FHSAA state title and complete their season. They had lost to STA earlier in the season.

    4. St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.), 18-2

    The Raiders were the Florida state runners-up after falling to Bishop Moore in the final to end a 16-game win streak. Their only other loss was against American Heritage-Delray (Fla.) in the third game of the season – one they avenged with an overtime win in the final stage before the state semifinals. 

    5. Cardinal Gibbons (N.C.), 19-2

    The Crusaders beat Myers Park (N.C.) 19-12 to win their second consecutive NCHSAA state championship. Elizabeth Wilson led with five goals, including two in the first five minutes when the Crusaders sprinted to a 5-0 lead. Myers Park rallied and kept it close, but never led. The Crusaders beat Broughton 20-3 in the semifinals to advance to the title game, as Jordan Lappin led with seven goals and an assist, Grace Nelson had four goals and Sarah Boney chipped in six groundballs and three interceptions. 

    6. American Heritage-Delray (Fla.), 19-1

    The Stallions suffered their only loss of the season in the third round of the Florida state playoffs, losing to St. Thomas Aquinas. Freshman Caitlyn Wurzburger finished the season with 101 goals and 117 assists. 

    7. Episcopal School of Dallas (Texas), 20-2

    The Eagles capped an impressive season by winning their first Texas state championship. They avenged their only in-state loss by beating Hockaday (Texas) in the final. 

    8. North Gwinnett (Ga.), 20-2

    The Bulldogs’ dream season ended with a 16-3 loss to top-ranked Milton in the GHSA 6A/7A semifinals. It was their first appearance in the state final four and their only other loss this year was a one-goal decision against Northview (Ga.). 

    9. Blessed Trinity (Ga.), 19-3

    The Titans beat Kell (Ga.) 11-9 to win their second consecutive GHSA 1-5A state championship. Mary Markwordt led the team with four goals and two assists, Elise Hammelrath added three goals and Mackenzie Driscoll had 12 saves. Blessed Trinity went up 2-0 and then 4-2, a lead they never surrendered even though Kell scored the final three goals of the game. 

    10. Barron Collier (Fla.), 20-2

    The Cougars’ season ended in the Florida state semifinals, but they took a huge step in getting to the Final Four. For the first time in program history, they beat perennial road block Vero Beach in the regional final. 

    — Aimee Ford Foster     

    Midwest Top 10

    1. Loyola Academy (Ill.), 28-2

    The Ramblers, led by senior Brennan Dwyer, won their ninth-straight state title by defeating New Trier (Ill.) 15-9 on June 2. Loyola’s only losses came against nationally-ranked St. Stephen's & St. Agnes (Va.) and Ohio champion Upper Arlington. Dwyer finished the season with a state-leading 108 goals to go along with 60 assists, and teammate Madison Kane joined the 100-point club with 103 points this season. Previous: 1

    2. Upper Arlington (Ohio), 19-2

    The Golden Bears repeated as state champions, winning the Division I title with a 15-6 win over then-undefeated Massillon Jackson (Ohio) on June 3. Upper Arlington’s season was highlighted by a win over Loyola Academy (Ill.). Olivia Schildmeyer led the way with 50 goals and 28 assists this season. Previous: 2

    3. Rockford (Mich.), 20-2

    The Rams won their fifth straight state title on June 10 by defeating Birmingham Unified (Mich.) 17-7. Mekenzie Vander Molen stood out for Rockford, scoring 51 goals and adding 33 assists. Rockford’s state season was punctuated with a win over New Trier (Ill.). Previous: 3

    4. Eden Prairie (Minn.), 18-1

    Abby Johnson scored six goals and teammate Naomi Rogge tallied four in a 16-10 win over the Blake School on Saturday, as the Eagles collected their third straight Minnesota state title. Eden Prairie defeated Farmington (Minn.) 19-3 in the semifinals Thursday. Previous: 5

    5. Cathedral (Ind.), 17-1

    The Irish won their second state title in three years after defeating previously unbeaten Culver Academy (Ind.) by a 12-11 margin on June 3. Cathedral’s only loss came against Loveland (Ohio) on April 8 and the Irish also had notable wins against Zionsville (Ind.) and Noblesville (Ind.). Previous: 4

    6. Massillon Jackson (Ohio), 21-1

    The Polar Bears couldn’t complete a perfect season, as they were upended by defending champion Upper Arlington (Ohio) in the state final for a second straight year on June 3. A pair of wins over New Albany (Ohio) and a three-win trip to Georgia punctuated Jackson’s season. Julia Hartnett finished the year with 75 goals, and Liz Davide scored 44 goals and added 14 assists. Previous: 6

    7. New Trier (Ill.), 22-4 

    The Trevians finished as state runners-up after falling to Loyola Academy (Ill.) 15-9 in the final June 2. New Trier defeated in-state rival Hinsdale Central twice, including a 7-5 win in the state semifinals. Katherine Gjertsen led the way for New Trier in 2017 with 123 points. Previous: 7

    8. Hinsdale Central (Ill.), 16-6

    The Red Devils officially ended the season in third place in Illinois after defeating Glenbrook South (Ill.) 9-8 in the state’s consolation game June 2. Hinsdale won big interstate contests against Cranbrook Kingswood (Mich.) and Potomac School (D.C.). Anna Santulli (Stanford) scored 84 goals and added 36 assists this season. Previous: 8

    9. Culver Academy (Ind.), 17-1

    Despite a furious comeback, the Eagles lost in the state title game to Cathedral 12-11 on June 3. Culver played a mostly in-state schedule, but defeated Fenwick (Ill.) during its unbeaten regular season. Previous: 9 

    10. Hudson (Ohio), 16-3

    The Explorers’ season ended on May 27 with a loss to then-undefeated Massillon Jackson in the regional finals. Two of Hudson’s three losses came against Jackson, but the Explorers had notable wins over Revere (Ohio) and New Albany (Ohio). Previous: 10

    — Justin Boggs

    West Top 10 (season complete)

    1. Torrey Pines (Calif.), 23-0

    The Falcons beat Poway 15-5 to claim the CIF San Diego Section Open Division championship and cap their first perfect season. Kelly McKinnon led the team with more than 90 goals this season, as Torrey Pines led the San Diego area with 15.04 goals per game and a 9.38 average goal differential. Previous: 1 

    2. Novato (Calif.), 25-1

    The Hornets three-peated as North Coast Section Division 1 champions in impressive fashion, beating California High 22-10 in the final. Charlie Rudy (Colorado) had 160 goals for the season. Novato’s lone loss was a one-goal decision against Davis (Calif.), which it avenged en route to its title. Previous: 2 

    3. Colorado Academy (Colo.), 17-2

    The Mustangs collected their third straight state title Wednesday with an 8-5 win over Cherry Creek (Colo.). They went on a 4-0 run in the first half to distance themselves and held on, as Claire Wright (three goals) and Sloane Murphy (two goals and one assist) led the way with three points each. Bridget Sutter recorded 12 saves. Previous: 3 

    4. St. Ignatius Prep (Calif.) 10-6

    The Wildcats ended a tough season on a high note, cruising to a 14-6 win over former No. 5 California High (Calif.) on May 2. Three of their losses came against teams that have been nationally-ranked this season and two others were against the No. 2 and 3 teams in the West. St. Ignatius has no postseason, as the West Bay Athletic League disbanded for girls’ lacrosse and the Central Coast Section offers no tournament. Previous: 4

    5. California High (Calif.), 18-4

    The Grizzlies beat San Ramon Valley (Calif.) 20-11 in the North Coast Section Division I semifinals but couldn’t keep up with Novato in the final. Isabella McHugh led the team with 78 goals and 14 assists, and Marissa Leonardi added 72 goals and 17 assists. Previous: 5

    6. Lake Oswego (Ore.), 20-2

    The Lakers claimed their second straight title with a 13-3 win over Oregon Episcopal (Ore.) in the OGLA final. Lauren Gilbert finished the season with 97 goals and 40 assists to lead the team, which was perfect against in-state opponents. Previous: 6

    7. Cherry Creek (Colo.), 15-4

    The Bruins ended their season with an 8-5 loss to Colorado Academy in the state championship game for a third year in a row. Peal Schwartz and Emma Godfrey both scored two goals, but 10-time champion Cherry Creek came up short in its 20th straight finals appearance. Previous: 7

    8. Mater Dei (Calif.), 16-5

    After beating Foothill-Santa Ana (Calif.) 13-9 in the Orange County final, the Monarchs rolled to a 21-11 win over Redondo to repeat as CIF Southern Section champions. Grace Houser (California) led the team with 90 goals and 23 assists this season. Previous: 8

    9. Eastside Catholic (Wash.), 15-3

    The Crusaders avenged their two in-state losses in the Final Four to repeat as state champions. After beating Issaquah (Wash.) 15-11 in the semifinals, they topped previously unbeaten Bainbridge Island (Wash.), 16-11, in the championship. Previous: 9

    10. Menlo (Calif.), 17-2

    The Knights claimed the West Bay Athletic League Foothill Division tournament championship with an 8-3 win over Menlo-Atherton (Calif.) after knocking out Sacred Heart Prep (Calif.) 13-7 in the semifinals. Previous: 10

    — Laurel Pfahler

    Short Summary: 
    Needham (Mass.) upset previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photographer Main Image: 
    PHOTO BY MARY SCHWALM/BOSTON GLOBE
    Photographer Parallax: 
    PHOTO BY JOHN AUTEY/PIONEER PRESS
    Photo Main Caption: 
    Needham (Mass.) used strong team defense to secure an 8-5 win over previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    Eden Prairie earned its third straight Minnesota state title with a 16-10 win over the Blake School on Saturday.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine
  • Five Sites of New York’s L.G.B.T. History
    Monday Jun 19, 2017

    Jacob Riis Park, a Manhattan church, the Bum Bum Bar and more. In 360 degrees, visit five sites that helped shape New York City’s L.G.B.T. community and its history.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • AquaBounty Lines Up First U.S. Fish Farm With Deal for Indiana Site
    By Frank Vinluan - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    When salmon from AquaBounty Technologies reach grocery stores and restaurants, some of them will come from America’s heartland. AquaBounty (NASDAQ: AQB) has agreed to pay $14 million in cash to acquire some of the assets of Bell Fish Company, including that company’s fish farm in Albany, IN. The deal will give Maynard, MA-based AquaBounty its […]

    Source: Xconomy VC, Deals, & Startups Feed
  • Restaurant Review: At Don Peppe, Expect a Lot of Everything
    By PETE WELLS - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    The hallowed Italian-American restaurant is near the airport and the racetrack in Queens, but it’s in a world of its own.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Delta Increases Site Traffic From Paid Search By 852%
    Friday May 19, 2017

    The AAA estimates 39.3 million Americans will travel at least 50 miles from home this holiday weekend. And they'll look for the best airline to get them there.

    Source: Media Post: SearchBlog
  • Mearns Excited to Recruit, 'Build a Winner' at St. Bonaventure
    By mhamilton - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    St. Bonaventure announced Tuesday that it was hiring former Canisius and Canadian national team coach Randy Mearns to lead its newly founded men's lacrosse program. Mearns, who won the 2014 FIL World Cup gold medal with Canada, spent 19 seasons at Canisius before making the short jump to St. Bonaventure. During his time with the Golden Griffins, Mearns advanced to two NCAA tournaments and had nine players selected in the MLL or NLL drafts. 

    Mearns spoke with US Lacrosse Magazine about his vision for the Bonnies lacrosse program, which will officially begin playing at the Division I level in 2018-19, and his excitement for a new challenge.

    How do you sum up the opportunity that you’ve been presented with at St. Bonaventure?

    I’m very excited about the opportunity. It’s something that you dream about, having the opportunity. It was kind of a side thought, they were just gong to start Division I lacrosse at St. Bonaventure. That’s like news. It’s like Utah coming out. ‘Hey, wow, another Division I program. This is great. Growth of the game, where’s it all going, love it, love it, love it.’ I had the opportunity to listen to a podcast with [Athletic Director] Tim Kenney and kind of understand what they were going to do. You could hear the enthusiasm. You hear it and you just move on. I wrapped up the season and all that good stuff. Then, through some third parties, they were like ‘Hey, we feel like you’d be a good fit. You should be a short list guy. What are your thoughts on that?’ I said I appreciate that. I had to explore it a little bit more and figure out what they were really trying to do.

    I talked to my wife first and talked to [Cansius AD] Bill Maher and he was great through this whole process. I said ‘Hey, I just feel like I need to go explore this. I’m just interested to see what this is.’ … I had the opportunity to get up on campus and meet people. I hadn’t been up on campus for 25 years or so. I can’t recall whether it was ’91 or ’92 when I actually played against St. Bonaventure. I rolled up on campus and I was like ‘Wow. Look at this place.’ It’s like a gem in the rolling hills of the Allegheny.’ … All of a sudden, I didn’t sleep for three days. it’s a big life decision. At the end of the day, I was ready for a new opportunity. I said ‘Let’s take a bite out of this apple and let’s create this vision with a lot of energy.'

    What are the first steps to building this new program?

    We can build a foundation and I’d like to say a new foundation. There’s probably 70, 80, 90, I think they call them the godfathers. Because back in the day St. Bonaventure did have men’s lacrosse. I played against them. I actually got smoked against them. From what I hear, they are super pumped because lacrosse is back at their institution. We can start to reconnect with them, that’s the first order of business.

    The second is to hire an assistant coach full-time. The third thing is to get on the road recruiting and start to build this program. I couldn’t be more excited. In some sense, you go through it and you take a leap of faith at times, but sometimes change is good. I’m proud and honored and humbled to be this guy leading a whole new generation of St. Bonaventure lacrosse.

    Category: 
    College
    Author: 
    Matt Hamilton
    Body Section One: 

    What was the prevailing factor that led you to join St. Bonaventure?

    It’s probably a couple things. It was a really good fit from a family standpoint. Just vision. We want to win there. We want to win it all. How do we get there? We know it’s going to take a little bit of time. You see it happening. You watch Marquette do it. I competed against Monmouth and watched Coach Fisher do that. Ryan Polley and Boston U and Richmond. You see this evolution of how to build a program right from the start with a clean slate. Then, in three, four or five years, you’re just nationally recognized. You’re getting to the NCAAs.

    It's just a blank canvas and now I can utilize 19 years of ups and downs and all those experiences and memories. I learned a lot of it, in the early years, by trial and error. So now I can sit there and say ‘Where can I go with this?’ Understanding the vision. We’re going to be fully funded and looking to really make an impact in the sport of lacrosse at St. Bonaventure. Tomorrow will be my first official day and then the journey begins.

    How is recruiting different from a small, private school like St. Bonaventure, as opposed to a new program at a larger school like Utah?

    You have to find the right kids. They have to have high academics. The academics at St. Bonaventure are phenomenal. You have to find the kids that don’t mind and are intrigued about a smaller campus as opposed to a bigger campus. You have to find those right fit kids who are looking to live a dream and have goals. Then I reflect and I can sit there and analyze every high school program in the United States, let alone all the connections in Canada that’s not far away. In my mind, I’m doing rough math, but there’s 42,000 juniors looking for homes. I feel like I got to be able to find 24-30 guys my first year.

    With the resources that I have, I’m extremely confident that we’re going to be able to get that done. Is that a metric of Western New York and upstate and down the 90 with Rochester and Syracuse, the Albanys, Southern Ontario, Michigan, Pennsylvanoa, Ohio? At the same time, there’s a lot of good lacrosse everywhere. There’s kids that are legit everywhere. Now it’s a function of not leaving any stone unturned and start to utilize all the contacts and connections and start to try to find those right fit student athletes that have those goals. There’s only 72 Division I lacrosse programs and I feel I can get those guys.

    Quote: 
    At the end of the day, I was ready for a new opportunity. I said ‘Let’s take a bite out of this apple and let’s create this vision with a lot of energy.' - Saint Bonaventure coach Randy Mearns
    Image Parallax: 
    Body Section Two: 

    How helpful is it that St. Bonaventure sits in a lacrosse-rich region?

    It’s going to help tremendously. There’s so much lacrosse around the area. That small little area  is like an untapped market. There’s not really a lot of lacrosse. They’ve been trying to grow the game there with youth lacrosse. There's lacrosse all around. Theres competition. Obviously, from a Canisius standpoint, a Hobart standpoint, Syracuse — as everyone starts to evolve, you try to find what that right little geographical area is for you, where you can make some inroads.

    You can see as the game's continued to evolve and grow, rosters are starting to evolve into areas or have players from areas that maybe you don’t necessarily always go and recruit. Again, we’re going to try to make an impact in the upstate market, absolutely. We’re going to make an impact on the Southern Ontario market. We’re going to try to make an impact in Pennsylvania and Ohio and Michigan. I don’t want to sit there and say ‘Hey, we’re just going to focus on and 90-mile radius.’ But we will focus on that. There’s just too much lacrosse being played and too many good players all over the country and in Canada that if we’re doing the things that we need to do, we can find those guys. That’s the exciting part about this.

    Mark Matthews texted me congratulations, which was awesome and I’m happy he did that and appreciated it. He said ‘Hey, maybe I’ll come play for you because I have a year of eligibility.’ I said obviously he didn't and we laughed about it. He was like ‘Good luck with the squad next year,’ I was like ‘I don’t have any players.’ There’s some club lacrosse at St. Bonaventure so I’m excited to coach and see what’s there. There’s just this energy. It’s there. With all the experiences that I’ve had over 19 years and the international experience, having the opportunity to work with guys like John Grant Jr., that whole thing. As I continue to evolve, we have to find those guys, because they had the opportunity to evolve in college, as well. They were dreaming of playing in the NLL and the MLL and internationally. You have to have that goal already in mind, or that marriage won't work.

    How would you characterize the attitude toward lacrosse on campus?

    Everybody on campus is pumped. It checks a lot of boxes. It’s a sport that in short order, if you fund it correctly, you can get to a level that you’re nationally recognized, and that’s great for St. Bonaventure University. You have the opportunity to recruit and make some inroads maybe in some states and areas that St. Bonaventure, people there aren’t familiar with. From an enrollment standpoint, there’s an advantage to that because more kids are coming to the institution.

    Then you’re talking about building an alumni base, which will take a little bit of time. They are excited and ready to go and tackle this vision. Even within all the other sports, what [Athletic Director] Tim Kenney has been able to do there, with a new softball field and upgrading sports in terms of resources. There’s a really nice momentum moving forward. That’s exciting to be a part of. We talk and here’s what they say. They say ‘Listen, if you can just get them to come to campus, they’ll commit. You just have to get them there.’ That’s where I’m just like, ‘yeah, I can build a winner here.’

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    Are you planning on making a connection with the Native American tribes in the area?

    Obviously, we’re going to make some inroads. I have a relationship with some of those guys; Six Nation and Onondaga. Now, it’s a function of nurturing and starting to develop those relationships to a higher bond. At the end of the day, they are phenomenal lacrosse players. Are you kidding me? You look at Zed Williams and Zach Miller. They are countless. Then you have to say ‘What are you looking for?’ There’s an academic component to it. What’s the level that they are trying to play? Just like any other recruit. Now, it’s a function of making inroads, because it’s right in our back yard. it’s right there. That’s an exciting opportunity to try to take advantage. It’s part of the blank slate that we have. How do we build it? What relationships can we lean on immediately? What relationships can we start to develop? How do we introduce St. Bonaventure lacrosse to the world? The first couple years, there will be obstacles, but anything worthwhile doing is not easy.

    Where do you want this program to be in 5-10 years?

    I want to win a national championship. That’s just simple. That’s my goal. To do that, you have to have those resources. You have to have the right players. It’s hard to do. If I’m not talking about winning a national championship — for me, with the experiences from an international standpoint and playing experience with winning up in Canada — all of that stuff is my goal. That’s the goal we should be reaching for. We have to find a conference. Is it hard to win a conference championship? Hell yeah. It absolutely is. There’s so much great lacrosse being played at the Division I level.

    What conference do you see this program joining?

    We haven’t had too many of those conversations at this point. We know it would be strategically important to be within a conference because of the AQ. The lacrosse landscape continues to change. Off the get-go, is the application from a MAAC standpoint? Is it an NEC? Do those conferences need any more members? Is it America East? I don’t know what that is at this point. I know this: There are five programs out there that are independent. What’s that metric look like? There are four A-10 schools. What happens in five years? Are there more A-10 schools?

    I feel the growth of the game, and from a revenue standpoint to institutions, the landscape will continue to change. When Utah announced that they were adding it, that’s huge for lacrosse, just like St. Bonaventure adding. Any time there’s another program being added, it changes the landscape. I equate it to my old PLPA days. It’s like ‘Hey for those students out there wanting to play Division I lacrosse, another 40-45 jobs just opened up.’ That will work itself out. We’re hopeful that we can get into a conference.

    Short Summary: 
    Newly appointed Saint Bonaventure men's coach Randy Mearns spoke with us about his vision for the program.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photo Main Caption: 
    Randy Mearns was hired Tuesday to lead St. Bonaventure's first Division I men's lacrosse team.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    Mearns was an assistant for Team Canada in 2006 and 2010 before leading the team to the gold medal in 2014.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine
  • Boston to Baghdad: The Man Behind New England's Shootout for Soldiers Event
    By msilva - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    M

    ike Sullivan and lacrosse have long been in a love affair of sorts.

    It began in 1980s in Bardonia, N.Y., when Sullivan started playing in middle school. Eventually he made it to West Point and played two years of Division I lacrosse at Army. “Sully,” as he’s affectionately known, even played club lacrosse while stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, and while he was overseas in Kaiserslautern, Germany. His family also attends nearly every Boston Cannons home game. He serves on the board of the Eastern Massachusetts Chapter of US Lacrosse.

    Now 45 and a lieutenant colonel, Sullivan has taken his passion to another realm: organizing Boston’s Shootout For Soldiers event, which will commence its third rendition Friday at 7 p.m. Eastern at UMass Lowell.

    “While in Boston, I got an incredible feel for how lacrosse was growing, but also the patriotism and pride I saw in the community,” said Sullivan, who is wrapping up his doctorate at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts. “This was only a year after the Boston Marathon bombing, and things that caught my eye were everything from American flags to how much they seemed to respect the service members.”

    So Sullivan reached out to Tyler Steinhardt, the executive director of Shootout for Soldiers, and they ironed out the details of expanding to Beantown. The event, which features 24 hours of lacrosse and raises money to support American veterans, started in 2015 with 600 players and 3,200 attendees raising $26,170.

    That first year, Sullivan said there were plenty of hurdles, like having enough teams to play and working with Harvard, the host site. Last year, Shootout for Soldiers Boston expanded to the complex at UMass Lowell and raised $56,586. Forty-one teams registered for this year’s event with hopes of raising $75,000 for four national and two local military charities. 

    Category: 
    Fuel
    Author: 
    Jonathan Sigal
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    Sullivan said the point of Shootout for Soldiers Boston isn’t the money raised, but rather bringing the lacrosse community together and offering educational resources to veterans of the armed services. It helps, too, he said, that some “pretty cool” stories come out of the day.

    “We start with the veterans game, and last year we had three Vietnam vets, one guy who brought his old bucket helmet and wooden stick with him,” Sullivan said. “It looked like he was stepping out of a history book. The goalie on my team lost his leg in Afghanistan in 2012, so he's out there playing with a prosthetic limb.”

    Stories aside, partners and fellow organizers say that Sullivan truly is the lifeblood of Shootout for Soldiers Boston.

    It’s a sentiment echoed by Kevin Barney, the vice president and general manager of the Cannons. For this year’s event, the Cannons are expected to send Josh Hawkins and several other players to guest coach and interact with fans.

    “The event itself is something the Cannons saw as a great way for us to support our military veterans on a national and local level,” Barney said. “It’s a unique event and great opportunity and something we’re happy to get behind. Then when Mike Sullivan took over, it made it easier. A great guy who’s supportive of us and we obviously wanted to return that and support something he’s very passionate about.”

    Steinhardt went a step further, saying Sullivan has grabbed the event by the horns and “just run with it” the last few years. 

    “If you look at a Venn diagram of people who love lacrosse and work in the military, Sully fits exactly in the middle,” Steinhardt said. “He’s a guy who cares deeply about both. It comes from a place of genuine care and authenticity that really drives the event. It’s what fueled Boston to grow so rapidly.”

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    “If you look at a Venn diagram of people who love lacrosse and work in the military, Sully fits exactly in the middle.” — Tyler Steinhardt, executive director of Shootout for Soldiers
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    While praise for Sullivan and Shootout for Soldiers Boston go hand in hand, the organization also hosts events on a national scale. In all, 11 cities ranging from Dana Point, Calif. to Aurora, Colo., to Baltimore hold similar days. A recent event in Baltimore raised a Shootout for Soldiers-record $201,738.

    And if Sullivan’s plans unfold, their portfolio will expand even further.

    On July 2, he’s shipping out to Baghdad, Iraq for a yearlong deployment. There’s a group of about 20 guys at the American embassy who play lacrosse on a turf field, Sullivan said, but often lack enough equipment. Thus, Sullivan, who works with Operation Baggataway, a charity that donates used lacrosse gear to service members, plans to bring sticks and more.

    With that, he hopes to launch a Shootout for Soldiers Baghdad.

    “There’s no way we can play for 24 hours, but even if we just do two or three hours and maybe do a live stream of what we’re doing and tell people about where the different players are from and their jobs in Iraq are, I think it’d be a neat opportunity,” Sullivan said. “It’d educate people about why we’re still there and how lacrosse weaves into everything we do. Once I get on the ground, I'm going to try and make it happen.”

    Sullivan’s hope for expansion does not stop there, though. 

    Upon returning from his deployment, the military will send him and his family to a currently unknown city, where he plans on starting another Shootout for Soldiers event. And even while stationed in Baghdad, Sullivan plans on helping organize the Boston event in 2018, much to his wife’s chagrin.

    He’ll have plenty of help, though, mainly Rachael Rennie, who will take over and he dubbed his “partner in crime.” 

    “Mike’s been a huge all-around life mentor,” Rennie said. “I’m going to miss him like crazy and it’ll be sad to see him go, but I’m looking forward to filling his shoes. I know what we need to do, I just have to set aside the time. It’ll be a struggle for sure, but I’m excited for it.”

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    All things considered, Shootout for Soldiers Boston has grown by leaps and bounds, with Sullivan at the center of it all.

    It’s led to guys like Joe Cardona, the long snapper for the New England Patriots, and Margo McAuley, a broadcaster on Lacrosse Sports Network, coming out. This year’s event will even feature a Tufts alumni team, with former head coach Mike Daly and current head coach Casey D'Annolfo expected to show.

    But, at the end of the day, Sullivan has a simple message regarding what Shootout for Soldiers Boston is all about.

    “I tell everyone I get the opportunity to tell, the service members that deploy, we have the easier job, as much as people don’t believe me,” Sullivan said. “It’s the spouses, the husbands, the wives, the same-sex partners that stay back who I think have the much tougher job. This day really lets us all come together and experience what that’s all about.”

    Short Summary: 
    Lt. Col. Mike Sullivan, organizer of this weekend's Shootout for Soldiers in Boston, deploys to Iraq July 2.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photographer Main Image: 
    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHOOTOUT FOR SOLDIERS
    Photographer Parallax: 
    PHOTO COURTESY OF SHOOTOUT FOR SOLDIERS
    Photo Main Caption: 
    Lt. Col. Mike Sullivan, a former Army lacrosse player, deploys to Baghdad on July 2.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    “Sully” organizes Shootout for Soldiers Boston, which will draw 41 teams this weekend to UMass Lowell with hopes of raising at least $75,000 for national and local military charities.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine