aloha international tourism development limited

111 washington ave., suite 703
albany, new york 12210

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MARCH 07, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4540269

County
ALBANY

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - ALOHA INTERNATIONAL TOURISM DEVELOPMENT LIMITED









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Harnessing The Brain Power In Travel
    Monday May 1, 2017

    Tourism Cares works to develop, enhance and unite the industry's pro bono volunteering efforts.

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Travel
  • Destination Unknown: Travel Brands Amidst The Current Travel Climate
    Monday May 8, 2017

    As we reach the midpoint of 2017, the U.S. dollar is strong, domestic traveler optimism is up, and the market is experiencing positive consumer sentiment. This after a new administration took the reins in January amidst an increasingly divisive political climate - and introducing a travel policy that temporarily restricted inbound travel for certain international travelers. This shot heard 'round the world reasoned protection, anticipation, and readiness; however, it also echoed sentiments of unwelcomeness and created an immediate (and costly) decline in U.S. tourism. But we have seen this before.

    Source: Media Post: Marketing: Travel
  • North Korea Accuses U.S. of ‘Mugging’ Its Diplomats in New York
    By CHOE SANG-HUN - Sunday Jun 18, 2017

    Officials returning from a United Nations conference were about to board a plane when federal agents seized a package they were carrying.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Needham Joins Final Nike/USL HSG Top 25 With Upset of Longmeadow
    By mschneider - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    In the final in-season update of the Nike/US Lacrosse High School Girls Top 25, three teams found new spots at the bottom of the pack.

    Thanks to Needham (Mass.) upsetting previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game to jump in at No. 22, Archbishop Carroll (Pa.), the PIAA 3A champion, moved up two spots, while Bayport-Blue Point (N.Y.) dropped just one.

    Skip to: National | Northeast | Mid-Atlantic | South | Midwest | West
    Category: 
    High School
    Author: 
    Laurel Pfahler
    Body Section One: 

    National Top 25

     
    June 20, 2017

    W/L

    Prev

    Next

    1 McDonogh (Md.) 22-0 1 Season complete (IAAM champion) 2 Garden City (N.Y.) 20-1 2 Season complete (Class B champion) 3 Glenelg (Md.) 20-0 3 Season complete (Maryland 3A/2A champion) 4 Notre Dame Prep (Md.) 19-3 4 Season complete (IAAM runner-up) 5 Mount Sinai (N.Y.) 18-2 5 Season complete (Class C champion) 6 Bridgewater-Raritan (N.J.) 22-1 6 Season complete (Group 4/TOC winner) 7 Ridgewood (N.J.) 21-1 7 Season complete 8 Bishop Ireton (Va.) 19-5 8 Season complete (WCAC/VISAA champion) 9 St. Stephen's & St. Agnes (Va.) 27-2 9 Season complete (ISL Champion/VISAA runner-up) 10 Darien (Conn.) 20-3 10 Season complete (Class L champion) 11 Pittsford (N.Y.) 20-1 11 Season complete (Class A champion) 12 Middle Country (N.Y.) 18-4 12 Season complete (Class A runner-up) 13 Skaneateles (N.Y.) 18-4 13 Season complete (Class D champion) 14 Milton (Ga.) 17-4 14 Season complete (GHSA 6A/7A champion) 15 Loyola Academy (Ill.) 28-2 15 Season complete (state champion) 16 Oak Knoll (N.J.) 21-5 16 Season complete (NJSIAA Group 1 champion) 17 Summit (N.J.) 19-3 17 Season complete (NJSIAA Group 3 champion) 18 Moorestown (N.J.) 20-3 18 Season complete 19 Christian Brothers (N.Y.) 16-4 19 Season complete 20 Eastport-South Manor (N.Y.) 15-3 20 Season complete 21 Archbishop Carroll (Pa.) 24-1 23 Season complete (PIAA 3A champion) 22 Needham (Mass.) 23-3 NR Season complete (Division I champion) 23 Bayport-Blue Point (N.Y.) 13-4 22 Season complete 24 Agnes Irwin (Pa.) 21-5 24 Season complete (PAISAA champion) 25 Fayetteville-Manlius (N.Y.) 17-4 25 Season complete (Class B runner-up)
    Also considered: Marriotts Ridge (Md.), West Genesee (N.Y.), Shoreham-Wading River (N.Y.), St. Anthony's (N.Y.), Ward Melville (N.Y.), Episcopal Academy (Pa.), Lawrenceville (N.J.), Brighton (N.Y.), Longmeadow (Mass.)
    Quote: 
    Check back to USLaxMagazine.com each Tuesday next year for national and regional rankings and top performers.
    AD Spot: 
    Image Parallax: 
    Body Section Two: 
    Nike/US Lacrosse High School Rankings
    National Boys' Top 25 | National Girls' Top 25
    Northeast Boys' Top 10 | Northeast Girls' Top 10
    Mid-Atlantic Boys' Top 10 | Mid-Atlantic Girls' Top 10
    South Boys' Top 10
    | South Girls' Top 10
    Midwest Boys' Top 10
    | Midwest Girls' Top 10
    West Boys' Top 10
    | West Girls' Top 10

    Northeast Top 10

    1. Garden City (N.Y.), 20-1

    The Trojans claimed their 14th state title in the past 22 years with a 16-8 win over Fayetteville-Manlius (N.Y.) in the Class B championship. Their lone loss was against nationally-ranked Moorestown (N.J.). Previous: 1

    2. Mount Sinai (N.Y.), 18-2

    The Mustangs topped Honeoye Falls-Lima (N.Y.), 15-4, to win their third straight Class C state title. They ended the season on a 15-game winning streak, following early losses to Shoreham-Wading River (N.Y.) and national No. 4 Notre Dame Prep (Md.) by a combined three goals. Previous: 2

    3. Darien (Conn.), 20-3

    The Blue Wave collected their fifth straight Class L state title with a 13-10 win over Wilton (Conn.). Their losses were to national No. 7 Ridgewood (N.J.), No. 2 Garden City and then-ranked Manhasset (N.Y.). Darien has won nine titles the past 10 years. Previous: 3

    4. Pittsford (N.Y.), 20-1

    Sophomore Ellie Mooney scored on a free-position shot just into the start of the second overtime to lift the Panthers to a 10-9 win over Middle Country (N.Y.) in the Class A final for the program’s first state title. Pittsford’s lone loss was to Brighton (N.Y.). Previous: 4

    5. Middle Country (N.Y.), 18-4

    The Wolverines scored two goals in the final minute of regulation to force overtime, but ultimately fell 10-9 in double overtime to Pittsford (N.Y.) in the Class A championship game. Three of their losses were to nationally-ranked opponents. Previous: 5

    6. Skaneateles (N.Y.), 18-4

    The Lakers closed the season with 15 straight wins, capped by a thrilling 12-11 overtime victory over Bronxville (N.Y.) in the Class D state final. Senior Kyla Sears (Princeton) scored her fifth goal with 23 seconds left in the second overtime to lift Skaneateles. Previous: 6

    7. Christian Brothers Academy (N.Y.), 16-4

    The Brothers didn’t get a chance to try to defend their state title after falling 9-7 to eventual champion Pittsford in the Class A semifinals. All four of their losses were against teams that are currently or have been ranked in the top 25 this season. Previous: 7

    8. Eastport-South Manor (N.Y.), 15-3

    E-SM’s season ended with a 12-6 loss to top-ranked Garden City in the Long Island Class B championship game. The Sharks led 6-5 at halftime, but were shut out in the second half. Kaitlyn Dowsett led E-SM with 34 goals and 41 assists this season. Previous: 8

    9. Needham (Mass.), 23-3

    The Rockets raced out to an early 4-1 lead and used strong team defense to secure an 8-5 win over previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game. Sarah Conley and Maeve Barker each finished with two goals and two assists for Needham, which topped Andover (Mass.), 18-8, in the state semifinals. Previous: NR

    10. Bayport-Blue Point (N.Y.), 13-4

    Bayport-Blue Point ended the season with a 9-6 loss to Mount Sinai in the Suffolk County Class C title game last month. Junior midfielder Cassidy Weeks led the Phantoms with 24 goals and 15 assists. Previous: 10

    — Will Cleveland

     

    Mid-Atlantic Top 10 (season complete)

    1. McDonogh (Md.), 22-0

    The Eagles’ unprecedented streak lives on as they finished an eighth straight perfect season with another IAAM title. They beat Notre Dame Prep (Md.), 12-9, in the final May 13 for their 177th consecutive win. Julia Hoffman (Maryland) posted a team-best 55 goals and Maddie Jenner (Duke) added 44 to go along with 165 draw controls. Previous: 1

    2. Glenelg (Md.), 20-0

    The Gladiators were perfect on the way to a repeat Maryland 3A/2A title, finishing with a comfortable win over C.M. Wright (Md.) in the championship May 23. Their résumé included a victory over IAAM power Notre Dame Prep (Md.) and two defeats of rival Marriotts Ridge (Md.). Glenelg put up 319 goals in 20 games this season with Alayna Pagnotta (Jacksonville) scoring a team-high 64 of them and Lindsay LeTellier (Davidson) assisting on 74. Previous: 2

    3. Notre Dame Prep (Md.), 19-3

    The Blazers pushed top-ranked McDonogh twice but couldn’t spring the upset. The second one was a 12-9 loss in the IAAM championship on May 13. Their only other setback came to Glenelg on April 15. Caitlynn Mossman (Boston College) stoked the offense with 46 goals and 46 assists, while goalie Lucy Lowe (Penn State) limited opponents to 6.7 goals per game. Previous: 3

    4. Bridgewater-Raritan (N.J.) 22-1

    Kirsten Murphy’s goal with one minute, 37 seconds left put the Panthers ahead for good in Saturday’s NJSIAA Tournament of Champions final against then-No. 12 Oak Knoll (N.J.). The senior attacker scored four times in the 7-6 win that gave Bridgewater-Raritan its first ToC title. Arielle Weisman made a pair of saves in the final minute to seal the narrow victory, which avenged its only loss of the season. Previous: 4

    5. Ridgewood (N.J.), 21-1

    The Maroons piled up as many impressive wins as anybody this spring, but their unbeaten run abruptly ended with a 10-9 loss to Bridgewater Raritan in the NJSIAA Group 4 semifinals on May 31. Chelsea Trattner (Stanford) and Alex Absey (Columbia) tied for the team lead with 61 goals apiece, while Hannah Cermack (Boston College) posted 47 goals and 44 assists for the most points. Previous: 5

    6. Bishop Ireton (Va.), 19-5

    The Cardinals earned WCAC and Virginia independent school titles, finishing the spring on a 13-game winning streak. They closed with their best victory, dropping St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes (Va.), 9-8 in overtime, on May 21. Madison Mote (Notre Dame) was the offensive catalyst, posting 24 goals and 68 assists for the season. Previous: 6

    7. St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes (Va.), 27-2

    The Saints started the spring with 15 straight wins and later claimed the ISL title, but they came up short in the Virginia independent school tournament. They lost 9-8 to Bishop Ireton in overtime on May 21. A high-scoring attack showed remarkable balance all season with Zoe Belodeau (Penn) leading the way with 115 goals and 55 assists. Previous: 7

    8. Oak Knoll (N.J.), 21-5

    The Royals finished their season Saturday with a 7-6 loss to then-national No. 6 Bridgewater-Raritan in the NJSIAA Tournament of Champions final. They had a couple of chances to tie in a thrilling final minute but couldn’t convert. Ali Baiocco (Stanford) scored once and closed her senior season with 104 goals. Oak Knoll knocked off then-No. 13 Summit, 11-9, on Wednesday to earn its spot in the final. Previous: 8

    9. Summit (N.J.), 19-3

    The Hilltoppers couldn’t land a repeat NJSIAA Tournament of Champions title. They won the Group 3 championship again but fell, 11-9, to then-No. 12 Oak Knoll in a ToC semifinal Wednesday. Summit scored the first four goals of the second half to take the lead before cooling off down the stretch. Helen Johnson (Stanford) and Anna Huntley-Robertson posted two goals apiece in the season-ending setback. Previous: 9

    10.  Moorestown (N.J.), 20-3

    The Quakers battled Summit into the final minute June 3 before falling, 9-8, in the NJSIAA Group 3 championship. Moorestown’s marquee victory in a strong spring came against New York power Garden City. Penn State-bound Quinn Nicolai provided a consistent spark with 60 goals and 28 assists. Previous: 10

    — Eric Detweiler

    Body Section Three: 

    South Top 10 (season complete)

    1. Milton (Ga.), 19-4

    Milton reclaimed the GHSA 6A/7A state championship with a convincing 13-4 win over Cambridge (Ga.). It is the 11th title overall for the Eagles, who finished as the state runner-up last year. Sophie Baez led the team with five goals. Milton reached the title game by handing North Gwinnett its second loss of the season. The Eagles scored the first 11 goals of the game in the 16-3 win, and Lexie Morton finished with five goals, all in the first half, while Hannah Demis added four scores.

    2. Hutchison (Tenn.), 20-1

    The Sting won their seventh consecutive TGLA championship, beating Harpeth Hall (Tenn.) 18-7. Griffin Gearhardt had five goals and two assists, and Elizabeth Farnsworth added four goals, three assists and seven draw controls. Janessa Mai scored three goals. The Sting advanced to the final with a 15-7 win over St. Mary’s in the semifinals. Gearhardt had six goals in that win.

    3. Bishop Moore (Fla.), 20-4

    The Hornets beat St. Thomas Aquinas in double overtime to claim their first FHSAA state title and complete their season. They had lost to STA earlier in the season.

    4. St. Thomas Aquinas (Fla.), 18-2

    The Raiders were the Florida state runners-up after falling to Bishop Moore in the final to end a 16-game win streak. Their only other loss was against American Heritage-Delray (Fla.) in the third game of the season – one they avenged with an overtime win in the final stage before the state semifinals. 

    5. Cardinal Gibbons (N.C.), 19-2

    The Crusaders beat Myers Park (N.C.) 19-12 to win their second consecutive NCHSAA state championship. Elizabeth Wilson led with five goals, including two in the first five minutes when the Crusaders sprinted to a 5-0 lead. Myers Park rallied and kept it close, but never led. The Crusaders beat Broughton 20-3 in the semifinals to advance to the title game, as Jordan Lappin led with seven goals and an assist, Grace Nelson had four goals and Sarah Boney chipped in six groundballs and three interceptions. 

    6. American Heritage-Delray (Fla.), 19-1

    The Stallions suffered their only loss of the season in the third round of the Florida state playoffs, losing to St. Thomas Aquinas. Freshman Caitlyn Wurzburger finished the season with 101 goals and 117 assists. 

    7. Episcopal School of Dallas (Texas), 20-2

    The Eagles capped an impressive season by winning their first Texas state championship. They avenged their only in-state loss by beating Hockaday (Texas) in the final. 

    8. North Gwinnett (Ga.), 20-2

    The Bulldogs’ dream season ended with a 16-3 loss to top-ranked Milton in the GHSA 6A/7A semifinals. It was their first appearance in the state final four and their only other loss this year was a one-goal decision against Northview (Ga.). 

    9. Blessed Trinity (Ga.), 19-3

    The Titans beat Kell (Ga.) 11-9 to win their second consecutive GHSA 1-5A state championship. Mary Markwordt led the team with four goals and two assists, Elise Hammelrath added three goals and Mackenzie Driscoll had 12 saves. Blessed Trinity went up 2-0 and then 4-2, a lead they never surrendered even though Kell scored the final three goals of the game. 

    10. Barron Collier (Fla.), 20-2

    The Cougars’ season ended in the Florida state semifinals, but they took a huge step in getting to the Final Four. For the first time in program history, they beat perennial road block Vero Beach in the regional final. 

    — Aimee Ford Foster     

    Midwest Top 10

    1. Loyola Academy (Ill.), 28-2

    The Ramblers, led by senior Brennan Dwyer, won their ninth-straight state title by defeating New Trier (Ill.) 15-9 on June 2. Loyola’s only losses came against nationally-ranked St. Stephen's & St. Agnes (Va.) and Ohio champion Upper Arlington. Dwyer finished the season with a state-leading 108 goals to go along with 60 assists, and teammate Madison Kane joined the 100-point club with 103 points this season. Previous: 1

    2. Upper Arlington (Ohio), 19-2

    The Golden Bears repeated as state champions, winning the Division I title with a 15-6 win over then-undefeated Massillon Jackson (Ohio) on June 3. Upper Arlington’s season was highlighted by a win over Loyola Academy (Ill.). Olivia Schildmeyer led the way with 50 goals and 28 assists this season. Previous: 2

    3. Rockford (Mich.), 20-2

    The Rams won their fifth straight state title on June 10 by defeating Birmingham Unified (Mich.) 17-7. Mekenzie Vander Molen stood out for Rockford, scoring 51 goals and adding 33 assists. Rockford’s state season was punctuated with a win over New Trier (Ill.). Previous: 3

    4. Eden Prairie (Minn.), 18-1

    Abby Johnson scored six goals and teammate Naomi Rogge tallied four in a 16-10 win over the Blake School on Saturday, as the Eagles collected their third straight Minnesota state title. Eden Prairie defeated Farmington (Minn.) 19-3 in the semifinals Thursday. Previous: 5

    5. Cathedral (Ind.), 17-1

    The Irish won their second state title in three years after defeating previously unbeaten Culver Academy (Ind.) by a 12-11 margin on June 3. Cathedral’s only loss came against Loveland (Ohio) on April 8 and the Irish also had notable wins against Zionsville (Ind.) and Noblesville (Ind.). Previous: 4

    6. Massillon Jackson (Ohio), 21-1

    The Polar Bears couldn’t complete a perfect season, as they were upended by defending champion Upper Arlington (Ohio) in the state final for a second straight year on June 3. A pair of wins over New Albany (Ohio) and a three-win trip to Georgia punctuated Jackson’s season. Julia Hartnett finished the year with 75 goals, and Liz Davide scored 44 goals and added 14 assists. Previous: 6

    7. New Trier (Ill.), 22-4 

    The Trevians finished as state runners-up after falling to Loyola Academy (Ill.) 15-9 in the final June 2. New Trier defeated in-state rival Hinsdale Central twice, including a 7-5 win in the state semifinals. Katherine Gjertsen led the way for New Trier in 2017 with 123 points. Previous: 7

    8. Hinsdale Central (Ill.), 16-6

    The Red Devils officially ended the season in third place in Illinois after defeating Glenbrook South (Ill.) 9-8 in the state’s consolation game June 2. Hinsdale won big interstate contests against Cranbrook Kingswood (Mich.) and Potomac School (D.C.). Anna Santulli (Stanford) scored 84 goals and added 36 assists this season. Previous: 8

    9. Culver Academy (Ind.), 17-1

    Despite a furious comeback, the Eagles lost in the state title game to Cathedral 12-11 on June 3. Culver played a mostly in-state schedule, but defeated Fenwick (Ill.) during its unbeaten regular season. Previous: 9 

    10. Hudson (Ohio), 16-3

    The Explorers’ season ended on May 27 with a loss to then-undefeated Massillon Jackson in the regional finals. Two of Hudson’s three losses came against Jackson, but the Explorers had notable wins over Revere (Ohio) and New Albany (Ohio). Previous: 10

    — Justin Boggs

    West Top 10 (season complete)

    1. Torrey Pines (Calif.), 23-0

    The Falcons beat Poway 15-5 to claim the CIF San Diego Section Open Division championship and cap their first perfect season. Kelly McKinnon led the team with more than 90 goals this season, as Torrey Pines led the San Diego area with 15.04 goals per game and a 9.38 average goal differential. Previous: 1 

    2. Novato (Calif.), 25-1

    The Hornets three-peated as North Coast Section Division 1 champions in impressive fashion, beating California High 22-10 in the final. Charlie Rudy (Colorado) had 160 goals for the season. Novato’s lone loss was a one-goal decision against Davis (Calif.), which it avenged en route to its title. Previous: 2 

    3. Colorado Academy (Colo.), 17-2

    The Mustangs collected their third straight state title Wednesday with an 8-5 win over Cherry Creek (Colo.). They went on a 4-0 run in the first half to distance themselves and held on, as Claire Wright (three goals) and Sloane Murphy (two goals and one assist) led the way with three points each. Bridget Sutter recorded 12 saves. Previous: 3 

    4. St. Ignatius Prep (Calif.) 10-6

    The Wildcats ended a tough season on a high note, cruising to a 14-6 win over former No. 5 California High (Calif.) on May 2. Three of their losses came against teams that have been nationally-ranked this season and two others were against the No. 2 and 3 teams in the West. St. Ignatius has no postseason, as the West Bay Athletic League disbanded for girls’ lacrosse and the Central Coast Section offers no tournament. Previous: 4

    5. California High (Calif.), 18-4

    The Grizzlies beat San Ramon Valley (Calif.) 20-11 in the North Coast Section Division I semifinals but couldn’t keep up with Novato in the final. Isabella McHugh led the team with 78 goals and 14 assists, and Marissa Leonardi added 72 goals and 17 assists. Previous: 5

    6. Lake Oswego (Ore.), 20-2

    The Lakers claimed their second straight title with a 13-3 win over Oregon Episcopal (Ore.) in the OGLA final. Lauren Gilbert finished the season with 97 goals and 40 assists to lead the team, which was perfect against in-state opponents. Previous: 6

    7. Cherry Creek (Colo.), 15-4

    The Bruins ended their season with an 8-5 loss to Colorado Academy in the state championship game for a third year in a row. Peal Schwartz and Emma Godfrey both scored two goals, but 10-time champion Cherry Creek came up short in its 20th straight finals appearance. Previous: 7

    8. Mater Dei (Calif.), 16-5

    After beating Foothill-Santa Ana (Calif.) 13-9 in the Orange County final, the Monarchs rolled to a 21-11 win over Redondo to repeat as CIF Southern Section champions. Grace Houser (California) led the team with 90 goals and 23 assists this season. Previous: 8

    9. Eastside Catholic (Wash.), 15-3

    The Crusaders avenged their two in-state losses in the Final Four to repeat as state champions. After beating Issaquah (Wash.) 15-11 in the semifinals, they topped previously unbeaten Bainbridge Island (Wash.), 16-11, in the championship. Previous: 9

    10. Menlo (Calif.), 17-2

    The Knights claimed the West Bay Athletic League Foothill Division tournament championship with an 8-3 win over Menlo-Atherton (Calif.) after knocking out Sacred Heart Prep (Calif.) 13-7 in the semifinals. Previous: 10

    — Laurel Pfahler

    Short Summary: 
    Needham (Mass.) upset previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game.
    Sub-Category: 
    Photographer Main Image: 
    PHOTO BY MARY SCHWALM/BOSTON GLOBE
    Photographer Parallax: 
    PHOTO BY JOHN AUTEY/PIONEER PRESS
    Photo Main Caption: 
    Needham (Mass.) used strong team defense to secure an 8-5 win over previously-ranked Longmeadow (Mass.) in the Division 1 state championship game.
    Photo Parallax Caption: 
    Eden Prairie earned its third straight Minnesota state title with a 16-10 win over the Blake School on Saturday.

    Source: US Lacrosse Magazine
  • A Former Navy SEAL On The Hidden Influencers In Every Team
    By Chris Fussell - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    To spot who they are, have every new hire follow this rule for 90 days.

    In 2010, I was an executive officer in the Navy, splitting my time between U.S. headquarters and being deployed to an international location. This arrangement proved tricky as my responsibilities at headquarters grew, so I was authorized to hire a civilian to handle budget management, equipment maintenance, travel, and training coordination, among other functions.

    Read Full Story

    Source: Fast Company
  • 'The One Device' Explores the Creation of the iPhone, the Technology That Went Into It, and More
    By Eric Slivka - Tuesday Jun 20, 2017

    As we noted last week, today marks the release of The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone, a new book from Motherboard editor Brian Merchant chronicling the development of the original iPhone. I've had a chance to read through the book before its launch, and overall it's an entertaining read, although it comes up a bit short in its promise to unveil the secret history of the landmark device.


    The One Device is really a book in two parts, and the part directly covering the development of the original iPhone is actually only about 30 percent of the book, broken up into four chapters interspersed throughout. The remainder of the book covers topics that are related to the iPhone, but which are in most cases separate from the direct early iPhone history.

    In the four chapters that cover the development of the iPhone, Merchant weaves together his own interviews with a number of engineers who worked on the original iPhone with tidbits and quotes pulled from other sources such as executives' testimony in the Samsung trial, Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs, and Brett Schlender and Rick Tetzeli's Becoming Steve Jobs. Many of the members of the original iPhone team have left Apple over the past ten years, so some of those key former employees including Bas Ording, Richard Williamson, Imran Chaudhri, and the colorful Andy Grignon were willing to talk to Merchant about their time working on the project.

    There are some interesting details about early work on multi-touch inspired by Wayne Westerman's FingerWorks technology that was eventually acquired by Apple, Steve Jobs' obsession with secrecy on the project that led to the team winning an internal "innovation award" at Apple's annual "Top 100" retreat even though the project they working on couldn't be revealed to the those in attendance, and the trials and tribulations faced by the small initial team working under signifiant pressure.

    "That project broke all of the rules of product management," a member of the original iPhone group recalls. "It was the all-star team — it was clear they were picking the top people out of the org. We were just going full force. None of us had built a phone before; we were figuring it out as we went along. It was the one time it felt like design and engineering were working together to solve these problems. We'd sit together and figure it out. It's the most influence over a product I've ever had or ever will have."
    The "secret history" outlined in these chapters feels a bit on the light side, and it left me wishing Merchant could have dug into more detail on it. That's understandably a difficult task given Apple's penchant for secrecy that keeps many of those with direct knowledge off limits and others who were able to talk still limited in what they felt comfortable disclosing, but I was still hoping for a bit more.

    The bulk of the book covers topics that are more ancillary to the iPhone's development, areas such as raw material mining in Bolivia and Chile, working conditions in Foxconn's Chinese facilities, and some of the additional history on multi-touch. Background on ARM processors, lithium-ion battery technology, and Corning's Gorilla Glass help to fill things out, while a fairly extensive interview with Tom Gruber, one of the founders of Siri, helps the reader understand where Apple's personal assistant came from.

    Merchant spices up these chapters with his own first-hand experiences gained by traveling to many of the locations, offering not only vivid descriptions of the locations themselves but also in-person interviews with some of the innovators responsible for the technological leaps that eventually enabled the development of the iPhone.

    Overall, the book reveals only a few new tidbits and insights on the actual creation of the iPhone, but it's still interesting to hear some of these details shared directly by those who were there. Combine those stories with the background chapters on many of the components and technologies that have made their way into the iPhone, and for those reasons alone The One Device is a worthy read. It's a nice overview for those who may not be steeped in the history of Apple and its devices, but it left me wishing for more depth in the areas that mattered most.

    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone launches today and is available from Amazon, the iBooks Store [Direct Link], and other retailers.
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    Source: MacRumors : Mac News and Rumors
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