all you can eat corporation

846 portion road
lake ronkonkoma, new york 11779

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
MAY 30, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4584752

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
CHENG LIN
324 GREAT NECK
GREAT NECK, NEW YORK, 11021

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - ALL YOU CAN EAT CORPORATION









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Restaurant Review: At Atla, Mexican for Every Moment of the Day
    By PETE WELLS - Tuesday Jul 25, 2017

    From the chefs behind Cosme, a more casual cafe whose food you may want to eat every day.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Gadget Lab Podcast: Muzzle Phone Before It Eats You Alive
    By Wired Staff - Friday Jul 28, 2017

    Ban all smartphone notifications.

    Source: Wired Product Reviews
  • New Alexa skill aims to cut food waste by offering storage advice and tips on what’s still OK to eat
    By Kurt Schlosser, GeekWire - Friday Aug 18, 2017

    You can order takeout or learn how to prepare a meal with the help of Amazon's Alexa, but what about storing food or learning whether stuff in the fridge is still suitable for eating? A new skill for the voice assistant takes care of that, too.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Business and Technology News
  • Four ways a strong brand can drive corporate giving
    Thursday Feb 23, 2017

    A strong brand provides countless benefits for nonprofit fundraising programs. It helps organizations stand out from their peers, focuses fundraisers and other communicators on the messages they need to drive action, and provides the vision for a better future that inspires supporters to give.

    A strong brand can also give you the edge you need to attract corporate donors. With $24.5 billion donated by corporations last year, that’s no small consideration. Here are four ways that your brand can help support your corporate giving program:

    1. Trust
    A clearly defined brand will help your organization generate stronger, more trusting relationships with your supporters, a key ingredient in building engaged communities. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs want to do good, but they also want to promote their own brand and connect with consumers. If your audience is highly engaged, corporate donors can feel confident that their support will get noticed. Because people like to support companies that do good, a recognized connection with your organization can help them build trust and find new, loyal customers within your community.

    2. Reliability
    Corporate donors want to support good causes, but they also know that the nonprofit they choose to associate their brand with reflects back onto them. So, it is equally true that the values associated with a nonprofit brand will reflect on your corporate donors, and if your brand isn’t sufficiently professional or reliably expressed, you are starting at a disadvantage.

    3. Clarity
    CSR programs operate based on defined philanthropic priorities, which are typically selected based on the causes’ affinities with the company’s business interests. For example, Disney’s corporate citizenship program focuses on causes benefiting children. Other companies, like Google, that focus on organizations using technology to combat a range of issues, can get fairly niche. Having a clear mission statement—which is a core piece of your brand identity—as well as key messages articulated in concise language will help you appeal to a CSR team.

    4. Personality
    Well-defined brands, whether nonprofit or corporate, express a clear personality that helps them to distinguish themselves. Corporations prefer to support organizations that align with their brand’s personality, so having a distinct personality that aligns with a corporate brand can make your nonprofit more attractive.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • When’s the best time to rebrand?
    Thursday Mar 9, 2017

    There’s no such thing as the perfect moment to rebrand. Thoughtful timing makes a big difference in the experience and its outcomes, and can help make sure the right people are on the bus. But waiting too long can have very negative implications-- demotivating your staff and board, confusing your community, and creating a lackluster experience for donors and clients.

    So if you know it’s a necessary step for your organization to take at some point, how do you determine the right time to tackle a rebrand?

    Rebranding during times of predictable change
    Most nonprofits expect predictable moments of change such as the term-limiting of board members, the retirement of a CEO, or those that emerge from a long strategic planning or capital campaign process. Predictable change can be hard and scary, but because you saw it coming, time has hopefully been set aside to work on whatever is changing, and priorities have shifted in ways the whole organization acknowledges.

    The rebrands that generate the best results for nonprofits typically happen right after a new leader joins the organization, strategic planning concludes, or just before a significant capital campaign.

    Rebranding during these moments is more effective because leadership views the work as one of several changes essential to the organization’s growth and development, so there’s real commitment to see it through. Our national study of the impact rebranding has on nonprofits, “The Rebrand Effect”, showed that these organizations seem to raise more money, attract better board members, recruit more program participants, and motivate their staff more, too. (You can download the ebook about that study here.)

    Conversely, rebranding before a significant change in leadership can less effective, or even die on the vine entirely. A new Executive Director, Chief Development Officer, or Communications Director who inherits a rebrand they weren’t a part of has less investment in its success, or may not like it at all. Without senior-level support and a champion, the new brand is likely to be implemented less consistently and ineffectively. That’s a real waste of time and money.

    We recommend you wait for the key players to join your senior leadership team so they can be a part of the rebrand, if you know that change is coming within a year. They’ll be more likely to understand, leverage, and promote it if they are a part of the new brand’s creation.

    Its also best to wait until your strategic planning process is well underway and the future direction of the organization is clear before rebranding. Your rebrand is simply an extension of that plan: the two should, ideally, feel closely intertwined.

    Rebranding during times of unpredictable change
    While predictable changes can feel hard as you’re going through them, it’s the changes you didn’t see coming that can feel the most disruptive within an organization. Political changes alter the fundraising landscape. A crisis in your community shifts programmatic priorities overnight. The sudden departure of an executive director or other key staff person leaves you shocked… you get the point. These unpredictable changes inside and outside your nonprofit can stir up anxiety for staff, board, and your closest advocates. They eat up brainspace and energy you weren’t prepared for.

    When you’re already stretched thin, rebranding is harder because it requires real time, focus, and effort. If the changes aren’t likely to impact the engine that powers your work such as your fundraising and client-facing programs, waiting until you have the brainspace and energy for it as an organization may be the best plan. But if your funding sources are changing and you anticipate needing to build new relationships with individual donors or corporate supporters then it’s a mistake to wait too long, as you’ll want to establish your voice as effectively as possible. Don’t put off rebranding if it’s clearly an essential step toward building relationships that will be critical to your success or survival downstream.

    Timing
    A smart rebranding process begins by creating or refining assets that express your nonprofit’s vision, mission, and voice in powerful ways. Next, you’ll weave those elements into your website, social, print, in-person, and other materials. Finally, you’ll integrate it consistently into fundraising, awareness, recruitment, and other campaigns that reach and engage your audiences. That’s how household brands do it, and it takes time and consistency to do well. Start your rebrand before there’s a crisis or problem, if possible, so you don’t cut corners to get it done. After all, you’ll want it to last.

    Ask yourself these three questions
    Still not clear what you should do? Use these questions to guide a conversation about whether or not this is the right time to rebrand:

    1. Are we clear and aligned about where our organization is heading over the next few years so we can use that to inform our brand strategy, visuals, and messaging? 
    2. Is it likely that our Executive Director and any senior staff responsible for communications will be with the organization for at least a year to see this process through and help make it stick afterwards
    3. Is now a time when we should be investing in our own infrastructure and future so we can build relationships in a year or beyond with new donors, funders, clients, partners, or other key external audiences we might not be reaching effectively yet?

    This information visualization might help you decide, too. Lastly, it might also be useful to reach out to other organizations that have rebranded and learn from them. When and why did they do it? What were the benefits and challenges?

    Rebranding alone doesn’t raise awareness for your organization, it just gives you the tools to do so more effectively. A successful rebrand brings your organization’s vision and mission to life through a clear communications strategy, messaging, and visuals framework that staff and board can use to communicate consistently and effectively. Your staff will be able to speak, write, campaign, and engage people more powerfully, and in ways that reflects the essence of your vision and mission. Time it right to get the best value.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • 18 Clever Ways to Make Frugality a Highly Social Endeavor
    By Trent Hamm - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    It’s easiest to be frugal when you’re flying solo. When all you have to think about is yourself and your own internal demands, it’s easier to make frugal choices. Often, the desire to be social or the desire to keep up with social demands can really eat into our finances, because the financial cost of things like going out with friends and eating out with friends add up really quickly. Because of that, many people who dabble in frugality tend ...

    The post 18 Clever Ways to Make Frugality a Highly Social Endeavor appeared first on The Simple Dollar.

    Source: The Simple Dollar
all you can eat corporation lake ronkonkoma ny