all we know is produce LLC

7014 13th avenue, suite 202
brooklyn, new york 11228

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
NOVEMBER 15, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4487997

County
WESTCHESTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
UNITED STATES CORPORATION AGENTS, INC.
7014 13TH AVENUE, SUITE 202
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, 11228

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - ALL WE KNOW IS PRODUCE LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The High Value of Your Nonprofit’s Values
    Wednesday Jan 25, 2017

    I was delighted to participate as a steering committee in the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s inaugural Spark Prize, an exciting new grantmaking initiative. I was truly impressed with how the Foundation integrated its values into every aspect of this project and leveraged them as a strategic decision-making tool in the grant review process, so I asked their fabulous DIrector of Communications, Liane Stegmaier, to write about it.  - Sarah Durham

    This month, Brooklyn Community Foundation marks the third anniversary of Brooklyn Insights—an extensive Brooklyn-wide community engagement project launched shortly after our President Cecilia Clarke joined the Foundation, which ultimately produced a bold grantmaking strategy that has since garnered national recognition.

    And coincidentally, on this anniversary we are announcing the recipients of our new Spark Prize—one of the Foundation’s highest-profile grantmaking efforts to date, awarding 5 outstanding Brooklyn nonprofits with no-strings-attached grants of $100,000 each in recognition of their service to Brooklyn, commitment to equity and justice, strong organizational values, and dynamic vision for the future.

    While we’re often asked about the major themes surfaced through our 1,000-plus Brooklyn Insights’ community conversations, the core grantmaking strategies we’ve since focused on, or our new institution-wide Racial Justice Lens—in this blog, we’re going to focus on the set of values that emerged during Brooklyn Insights that not only helped the Foundation determine our new direction, but continue to guide us and inform new initiatives like the Spark Prize.

    Of course, we knew three years ago that creating a community-led strategy might also lead us to change our mission statement and vision. But what we didn’t fully appreciate at the time was that while mission and vision are critical for moving us forward, strong institutional values are necessary to define who we are as an institution and how we hold ourselves accountable to these pursuits each and every day.

    Over the six months of listening to Brooklynites tell us about the challenges they faced in their communities, the opportunities they saw for change, and the roles we as their Community Foundation could play, we also heard loud and clear a call for us to be a different kind of institution: one that wears its values on its sleeve, keeps the doors open, and always positions community voices at the fore of its work.

    This call led us to articulate five new values for Brooklyn Community Foundation:

    • Courage. We believe in fearlessly identifying barriers to change and we fight for solutions that help overcome injustice.

    • Creativity. We believe that the power of imagination is greater than the challenges we face. We celebrate what works. We pursue the new. We learn as much from failure as we do from success.

    • Honesty. We are committed to being open and trustworthy in all we do and seek partners who share our values.

    • Collaboration. We believe in creating solutions together, harnessing the diversity of Brooklyn, and partnering with the community to spark change and produce results.

    • Respect. We believe in every resident’s dignity and basic human rights, and honor diversity of race, gender and background.

    We’ve come to refer to these values at every test in our decision-making, we talk about them in our Board meetings, staff meetings, and annual staff reviews, and they’ve informed our ongoing racial justice and equity trainings.

    And with the new Spark Prize, we are spotlighting the importance of strong values, and celebrating 5 Brooklyn nonprofits for their exemplary values-driven work. The first-ever recipients of the Spark Prize are Audre Lorde Project, Common Justice, Make the Road New York, MoCADA, and Neighbors Together.

    A committee of approximately 30 Brooklyn civic, business and philanthropic leaders (including Big Duck’s own Sarah Durham!) selected the 5 organizations from an applicant pool of over 150. They were chosen on the basis of a 1,000 word essay, followed by in person interviews where each spoke to the role their values play in their organization and how they align with the Foundation’s values.

    In their application, Audre Lorde Project stated that their values are rooted in transparency, wellness, transformation, cultural work and coalition building. “Collaboration with other social justice organizations is central to ALP’s intersectional, movement-building work.”

    Make the Road wrote that their values are why their 19,000+ members shape all of their campaigns: “Our youth challenge oppression by naming the disparate treatment of black and brown, LGBTQ and immigrant young people …. Their passionate advocacy has resulted in huge movement victories.”

    MoCADA isa museum founded on principles of justice, equity, and inclusion….courage, creativity and collaboration are the key elements of our mission, vision and values.”

    Neighbors Together’s work isgrounded in our belief in the dignity and potential of each person to be a vital part of creating a more just society” and its members have the courage “to fight for real and lasting solutions to overcome injustice.”

    And last but not least, Common Justice highlighted each of their values in their application—demonstrating a deep connection between their values and the unique nature of their healing work between victims and perpetrators of violence:

    • Accountability. We are responsible for our actions, our words, our power, and our impacts. We know that accountability affirms the dignity and humanity both of those responsible and of those harmed, and we hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold others. 

    • Transparency. We are transparent about our actions, our intentions, our options, and our decisions. We communicate with clarity and consistency with those impacted by what we do. 

    • Transformation. We believe in the potential of all human beings to transform, heal, grow, change, and be resilient. We believe we all deserve individuals, communities, and institutions that support us in being our best selves. 

    • Respect. We believe in the inherent worth, importance, rights, culture, and strengths of all people, and work to reflect and honor that in the way we behave toward others. 

    • Purpose. We uphold the responsibilities and boundaries of our work because we are ambitious, hopeful, and outcomes-driven. 

    These 5 values send a powerful message, and are a primary reason Common Justice is receiving the Spark Prize in our inaugural year.

    As nonprofit communicators, we are all very familiar with the adage “Show, Don’t Tell.”

    Mission tells us what you do; values show who you are.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Saturday Night In ... Bedford-Stuyvesant: At the Center of Change, Cherry’s Unisex
    By GREG HOWARD - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    Saturday night in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, where the salon is an almost always-open witness to a neighborhood in the throes of change.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • ‘Confederate’ Producers on Backlash: We Know We’re ‘Dealing With Weapons-Grade Material’
    By Ashley Boucher, provided by
    - Friday Jul 21, 2017

    When the “Game of Thrones” creators announced their next project — “Confederate,” an alternate-history series that imagines a different outcome to the Civil War — on Wednesday, they knew there would soon be backlash.It is exhausting to think of how many people at @HBO said yes to letting two white men envision modern day slavery.[...] another Twitter user added, “So is the goal here to let racists all over know the blue print on how to bring slavery back?”‘OK, if this had happened here, how did the rest of the world change?’ That was another huge bonus factor for me — the idea of rewriting some of the history of, like, the French Revolution.The producers said that while the concerns expressed by many online are valid, people should reserve judgement for the premiere of the show to see whether or not they really do fail.“I wish their concern had been reserved to the night of the premiere, on HBO, on a Sunday night, when they watched and then they made a decision after they watched an hour of television as to whether or not we succeeded in what we set out to do,” Spellman said.“And it’s easy for folks to hide from it, because sometimes you’re not able to map it out, especially with how insidious racism has become,” he continued.[...] the idea that this would be pornography goes back to people imagining whips and plantations.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
  • Letter of Recommendation: Letter of Recommendation: The Pull-Up
    By SAM GRAHAM-FELSEN - Thursday Jun 29, 2017

    A quest to perfect an exercise of form and strength.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Giants need Matt Moore to start producing
    By John Shea - Sunday Jul 16, 2017

    Giants need Matt Moore to start producing SAN DIEGO — The next chapter in Matt Moore’s career with the Giants will begin Monday with the opening of a 10-game homestand. Moore will be pitching on eight days’ rest after lasting just 31/3 innings his last start, giving up a career-high-matching 12 hits. The Giants, who acquired the lefty knowing he had a team-friendly contract through 2019, are hoping for a second-half turnaround and momentum heading into next season. “That’d be huge for him and us,” manager Bruce Bochy said. The biggest thing with Matty is to simplify things, concentrate on throwing quality starts and not get caught up with the mechanics too much. Moore has given up 125 hits and issued 41 walks in 981/3 innings for a 1.69 WHIP this season. Suddenly, it’s no longer a slam dunk the Giants will exercise his $9 million option for 2018. Asked if Moore has been tipping his pitches, Bochy said, I don’t think so. There’s always a chance, but we’ve looked at that. Madison Bumgarner came out OK from Saturday’s start, his first in nearly three months. “We got him to where we wanted him,” Bochy said. When he was on the DL, he said ‘When I come back, you’re not going to hold me back, are you?’ I’m sure he feels some responsibility to come back in a strong fashion where he’s going to help the ballclub. John Shea is The San Francisco Chronicle’s national baseball writer. The Giants won’t face All-Star Corey Kluber because the Indians don’t want him to hit; he has had back issues.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top Sports Stories
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