all that glitters event planning and coordination LLC

44 east oneida street
oswego, new york 13126

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
NOVEMBER 15, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4488034

County
OSWEGO

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
SARA FULLER
44 EAST ONEIDA STREET
OSWEGO, NEW YORK, 13126

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - ALL THAT GLITTERS EVENT PLANNING AND COORDINATION LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Coordinated San Antonio Lawsuit Seeks to Derail Texas Anti-Sanctuary Law
    By Jason Schneiderman - Monday Jun 5, 2017

    The newly minted Trump administration and its immigration policies have aided anti-administration advocates. Recent events in San Antonio reflect this.

    The post Coordinated San Antonio Lawsuit Seeks to Derail Texas Anti-Sanctuary Law appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • Two Tips to Make Your Event Ticketing Process Easier
    By Sandy Rees - Thursday Apr 20, 2017

      It’s event season! As you prepare to get your gala on, here are some insights from our friends at AccelEvent to make it easier for participants to get tickets to your upcoming shindig.     As fundraisers and nonprofits tirelessly plan their fundraising events, one aspect that is typically taken for granted is the30

    The post Two Tips to Make Your Event Ticketing Process Easier appeared first on Get Fully Funded.

    Source: Get Fully Funded
  • Are You Having Too Many Fundraising Events?
    By Gail Perry - Friday Jun 9, 2017

    Are you having too many fundraising events?

    Love ‘em’ or hate ‘em, fundraising events are a fact of life for most nonprofits.

    Here’s the challenge: Fundraising events are our most inefficient way of raising money.

    In general, when you consider the true cost of events - many fundraising professionals feel they are not worth it.

    Here’s a well-known chart of “cost per dollar raised” for various fundraising strategies. It compares the efficiency of events versus direct mail versus major gifts.

    Cost Per Dollar Raised

    How much does it cost you to raise a dollar?

    (Data comes from James M. Greenfield.)

    When you consider fundraising strategies, there are clearly many other much more efficient and profitable ways to raise money.

    Let's educate the board and leadership about the true cost of too many fundraising events.

    Often board members and volunteers are not familiar with the financial model of event fundraising.

    They don't realize fundraising events take up so very much staff time.

    Events pull valuable fundraising staffers away from other, far more productive and profitable strategies.

    So devoting too much time to events means that you are not deploying your staff resources at their highest and best use.

    Every minute a staffer spends on events means that they are not able to call on major donors - where the money really is.  

    Board members and other leaders are often unfamiliar with -- or personally uncomfortable with -- the other fundraising strategies at our disposal.

    Particularly major gifts when we are face to face with donors.

    That’s probably why board members too often zero in on EVENTS as the life-saving panacea for fundraising.

    Events may be the only thing in their sphere of reference. Or it's their personal preference.

    Create an honest conversation with board members:

    When is the best time to have a calm and rational conversation about what's working and what's not working?

    It's when you're creating your Fundraising Plan for the year.

    It's a great time to discuss the smartest ways to raise the money your mission needs. It's a time to suggest that we cut back on events.

    That's why I created my Highly Profitable Fundraising Plan Toolkit, - to create a format to plan out the fundraising strategies that are best for your organization.

    I included a video module called "The Board Member's Guide to Fundraising Planning," where I discuss the consequences of having too many fundraising events.

    The Toolkit can help you put together a plan to maximize staff time and resources, and max out your fundraising potential.

    Click here to get your Highly Profitable Fundraising Plan Toolkit now

     

    Here are 3 reasons you should DITCH your next event:

    1. Events are not very efficient fundraising strategies.

    As I've mentioned, the return on investment you get from an event is far less than other fundraising options.

    Looking at the chart above, compare the costs of raising money with an event that to a mailing campaign like the annual fund – the cost per dollar raised is only $.25-.30 cents on the dollar.

    And the most efficient way to raise money of all is major gifts - when you are developing personal relationships with major donors.

    That’s only $.05 -.10 on the dollar.

    2. Too many fundraising events wear out your volunteers and staff.

    The last thing your hard-working staff needs is another event.

    Just consider - many fundraising staffers are working really long hours for not a lot of pay.

    They DO want to raise lots of gifts and contributions for your cause. But why ask them to spend so much energy on strategies that have such a low return?

    That's when they feel like their time is wasted - when it could be spent so much more productively.

    And consider your organization's wonderful, dedicated volunteers. How hard do events work your volunteers?

    Let's not run your lovely volunteers ragged either. Or they will abandon you.

    3. You can raise more money with one annual event than with 3, 4 or 5 events.

    Why? The real money from an event typically comes from sponsorships.

    And it takes months to organize a great sponsorship campaign.

    You need time to develop sponsorship materials, identify prospects, organize a committee and make the asks.

    Then you need the lead time to close the gifts and get the correct names on the invitation.

    By having too many events, you never have time to really max out your sponsorship potential.  You simply don't have the lead time.

    But if you only have one event - then you can focus all your efforts on smart sponsorship fundraising -and really bring in some serious sponsorship funding.

    Five benefits of only staging one major event a year:

    1.Your volunteers can focus and go all out in spreading the word and generating attendance, because they are only going to work on one a year.

    2. You can have the lead time you need to identify, cultivate, and ask sponsors. And, as I noted, that’s where the money is.

    3.. You’ll have greater attendance and attention from your supporters.

    4. You’ll be able to raise more money overall because the staff now has time to focus on other, more productive and more efficient fundraising strategies.

    5. You’ll have a happier and more productive staff.

    Bottom Line - Too Many Fundraising Events?

    Are YOU having too many fundraising events? At what cost?

    Leave a comment and let us know!

     

     

    The post Are You Having Too Many Fundraising Events? appeared first on Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry.

    Source: Fired-Up Fundraising with Gail Perry
  • 'NY Times' Finally Joins Snapchat Discover
    Monday Apr 24, 2017

    Does The New York Times joining Snapchat Discover lend an air of respectability to a new platform, and breathe new life into an aging publisher? That's obviously what the partners are planning -- butonly time will tell.

    Source: Media Post: MoBlog
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Netflix’s wrestling comedy ‘GLOW’ is a glittering knockout
    By USA TODAY - By USA TODAY - Friday Jun 23, 2017

    Even if you’re not a fan of the WWE, it’s hard not to get swept up in the fun with the Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling in Netflix’s new series. 

    Source: USA Today: All Entertainment Headlines
  • IAB Plans Marketplace Event Featuring Publishers' Content Studios
    Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) will launch a marketplace for publishers' content studios, to demonstrate the ways they apply their expertise to build marketers' brands. The day-long event isplanned for October in New York and will include nearly a dozen content studios.

    Source: Media Post: MediaDailyNews