ajm re holdings ix, LLC

po box 234800
great neck, new york 11023

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 07, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4442427

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2013 - AJM RE HOLDINGS IX, LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Who run the nonprofit world?
    Wednesday Feb 1, 2017

    For years, I’ve noticed that the majority of faces you see in most nonprofits belong to women. Beyonce got it right: women are the backbone of the social sector! They lead organizations, run departments, and power nonprofits at all levels. In fact, women make up most of the nonprofit workforce, yet despite that, we still occupy only a small percentage of the leadership slots at the top 400 charities. Sigh.

    How can we change that? And what can you do to make sure one of those top nonprofit leadership seats is reserved for you?

    I got together with Stephanie Thomas (of Stetwin Consulting) and Adrienne Prassas (of NYU Wagner)-- both fundraisers par excellence-- to convene a pop-up event for AFP NY members about women’s leadership not long ago. A few dozen women participated, representing a diverse mix of ages, backgrounds, and nonprofit professional experience. Here are a few highlights from our discussion.

    Volunteering is a great way to develop your leadership skills. Want to transition into a career in international development? Build your skills in planned giving? Overcome your shyness at speaking in front of groups? Volunteer! Organizing or staffing an event, coordinating a committee, and other volunteer activities not only open up networks, they force you to work with new people in new situations.

    Tell them what you need to learn. Trying to break into a new area? Develop new skills? Tell your boss or your peers and colleagues what you want to learn, and offer to help out with projects that may be outside of your job description so you can build your skills. For instance, if you’re a grant writer but you want to get into major donor work, ask your boss if you can help them research and prep for a meeting, or listen in on a meeting or two.

    Be yourself. We talked a lot about the power of authenticity in building a strong reputation. Not sure what the answer is? Be honest about it. It’s good to stretch - but it’s not good to be something you’re not. Most of the experienced women at this event found their careers really took off when they spoke with their own voice, rather than trying to play a part they felt was expected of them.

    Show up. It’s easy to watch that webinar from your desk, follow along via social media in your jammies from home, and learn virtually. But when you show up at a conference, breakfast, workshop, or other event, the benefits are much greater. Get out and show up! You’ll make deeper, more meaningful connections faster.

    Personally, I was deeply inspired by the younger women who participated, like Amalyah Oren, a young woman who works by day, volunteers by night, and writes a blog called the Giving Kind.

    If you’re building your leadership skills I’ll be participating in a panel on women’s leadership for the Foundation Center on March 7—details are online here. I hope you can make it!

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Leading a nonprofit rebrand: Lessons learned from Good to Great
    Thursday Dec 1, 2016

    Behind the most successful nonprofit rebranding initiatives lies not just a great logo or perfectly phrased tagline, but also a strong leader and team of people who feel engaged in the process, motivated to give thoughtful feedback, and focused on the goals of the work—not just the work’s deliverables.

    In the book Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't, Jim Collins offers a powerfully simple metaphor for explaining what makes a good organization become a great one, which naturally applies to the work of nonprofit rebranding.

    You are a bus driver. The bus, your company, is at a standstill, and it’s your job to get it going. You have to decide where you’re going, how you’re going to get there, and who’s going with you.

    Most people assume that great bus drivers (read: business leaders) immediately start the journey by announcing to the people on the bus where they’re going—by setting a new direction or by articulating a fresh corporate vision.

    In fact, leaders of companies that go from good to great start not with “where” but with “who.” They start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats. And they stick with that discipline—first the people, then the direction—no matter how dire the circumstances.

    Nonprofits embarking on big organizational shifts such as rebranding can also benefit from some of Collins’ thinking, shifting attention away from the “what” to the “who.” Inspired by his bus metaphor, we’ve assembled a few leadership lessons for nonprofits thinking about undergoing a significant rebrand. Safe travels.

    1. Invite the right passengers onboard the bus. Nonprofit rebranding is not a one-person job or a task managed exclusively by a consultant. Rebranding successfully requires assembling the right team for the journey as much as making decisions like what color your new logo should be. Strong leadership entails a well-thought-out plan for engagement and feedback from different areas of the organization—from staff inside and outside the communications team, to senior leadership, to the board, to outside experts and consultants. The earlier you know who needs to be on the bus, the better. 
    2. Get the right butts in the right seats. Effective nonprofit leaders don’t just invite the right people on the bus, they think about getting the right people in the right seats. For nonprofit rebranding, that means mapping out the responsibilities and expectations of those involved in the process based on their connection to the organization and areas of expertise, and clearly communicating how the ultimate decisions will be made. A RACI chart is a helpful tool to employ when rebranding: it clarifies roles and responsibilities, making sure that nothing falls through the cracks. RACI charts also prevent confusion by assigning clear ownership for tasks and decisions. We’ve seen that strong nonprofit leaders don't shoulder the full responsibility for decision making or obscure how the decision will ultimately be made or who will make it. 
    3. Agree upon the destination. Now that you have the right people in the right seats, work on defining and communicating the destination. Jim Collins explains that this is where many leaders fall short—they start first with the “what” and then shift to the “who.” In the case of the nonprofit rebrand, that means getting aligned about what the rebrand is ultimately in service of (fundraising? greater awareness? advocacy?), identifying who the right audiences are to achieve that goal, and clarifying the strategies to reach them. As a leader, it’s your job to ensure that everyone understands and is bought into what the destination is and how you’ll get there. If everyone on the bus has a different destination in mind, then it’s going to be a tough journey. Some of the most challenging rebrand processes we’ve been a part of happen when key people involved lose sight of why they’re doing this. It’s the leader’s job to keep that vision alive. 
    4. Expect some potholes. Change is hard, and rebranding is no exception. The more you can embrace the idea that challenges will be part of the process—and better yet, see them coming before anyone else does—the better shape you’ll be in. People will disagree, and the work might not be “it” the first time around. Rebranding is a process, and as a leader it’s your job to expect the challenges, understand them, and navigate through them. 
    5. Keep your passengers in the know. Communicating with everyone involved throughout the rebrand process is essential, especially because rebrands don’t happen overnight. Let folks know what the process will include, what’s happening next, and the status of everything. Don’t leave your passengers unengaged or lost. 
    6. Triage passenger feedback and politics. When it’s time to start making decisions and evaluating the work, it’s your job to listen to new ideas without judgment, take feedback seriously, and process what you’ve heard through the lens of the desired goals. Consider everything, but be comfortable knowing that not everyone’s opinions have to be included or have to be reflected in the final product. It’s up to you, as the leader, to decide and hold firm on what will (and what won’t) happen.
    7. Arrive safely at the destination. Ultimately, it’s your job as the driver on this journey to keep your hands on the wheel and your eyes on the road, and follow the smartest route possible. In a rebrand, you’ll have to ensure decisions are made, commit to those decisions, and make sure your team understands and supports those decisions. Some detours are okay, but a successful journey must come to an end.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • Former Sears Executive: Retailer Has “No Capacity To Operate As A Successful Company”
    By Laura Northrup - Friday Jun 9, 2017

    If you want to know what’s happening with a company, talk to insiders — or with former insiders, who are free to talk on the record. Like, for example, a former Sears executive who is now unfettered in his ability to give his honest opinion of the once-great retailer (and the man who has been steering the ship toward apparent …

    Source: The Consumerist
  • Monotype Appoints T3's Gaddis To Board
    Wednesday Feb 26, 2014

    Woburn, Mass.-based Monotype Imaging Holdings, a typeface technology provider, has appointed Gay Warren Gaddis to its board of directors. Gaddis is founder and chief executive officer of ad agency T3 (The Think Tank). "We're very excited to welcome Gay to the board of directors," said Doug Shaw, president and CEO of Monotype, in a statement. "She brings a strong combination of brand expertise and an entrepreneurial perspective -- qualities that will be of great value to Monotype, particularly as we move forward in helping brands to optimize content and ensure brand integrity in an increasingly digital world."

    Source: Media Post: MAD Boston
  • Little Games, Big Engagement
    Friday Sep 23, 2011

    One of the challenges brands often face when they look at getting into gaming is cost and time. Concepting a game people will actually play takes a great deal of time and specialized skills. But sometimes, the simplest games can engage thousands of people if the right circumstances come together.

    Source: Media Post: Gaming Insider
  • Mobile, Desktop Even In Race For Video Eyeballs
    Friday Mar 3, 2017

    Mobile phones and desktops are neck-and-neck when it comes to video viewing. More than half, or about 57%, of consumers around the world watch videos on their mobile phones every day. That's on par with the 58% of consumers who are checking out videos on their computer, according to AOL's State of the Video Industry Global Research Study.

    Source: Media Post: Video Insider
  • Theresa May Battles to Hold On as U.K. Prime Minister
    By STEPHEN CASTLE - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    In a meeting with restive lawmakers in her Conservative Party on Monday, Mrs. May will appeal for the unified backing she will need to survive for long as head of a minority government.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • How to Tie a Bow Tie, According to Paul F. Tompkins
    By Nick Douglas - Monday Jun 12, 2017

    “Put it around your stupid neck.” That’s how comedian/actor/dandy Paul F. Tompkins starts his tutorial on how to tie a bow tie. He peppers his instructions not just with jokes, but with helpful guidance about why you’re doing each step, which makes it much easier to follow along.

    Read more...

    Source: Lifehacker