ads bus service incorporated

725 south 5 ave
mt. vernon, new york 10550

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
APRIL 23, 2013

NYS DOS ID#
4392733

County
WESTCHESTER

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2013 - ADS BUS SERVICE INCORPORATED









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Cyclist Killed by Bus in New York’s First Citi Bike Fatality
    By MATTHEW HAAG and HANNAH ALANI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Dan Hanegby of Brooklyn fell under a bus’s tires in Chelsea. He worked for Credit Suisse and was once the top-ranked tennis player in Israel.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Purina's Bus Shelter Ads Make Cats Want To Pounce -- And Humans, Play
    Monday Nov 25, 2013

    To launch the debut of Felix, a cat food brand, in Mexico City, Purina created life-sized cat's cradles in five bus shelters throughout the city. Would this much yarn put a smile on Grumpy Cat's face?Probably not, but it gave me one, as I fondly recalled playing Cat's Cradle as a kid. Big Bang Global, a Mexico City-based agency, came up with the creative concept, which took two weeks toconceptualize and create.

    Source: Media Post: Creative Media Blog
  • Leading a nonprofit rebrand: Lessons learned from Good to Great
    Thursday Dec 1, 2016

    Behind the most successful nonprofit rebranding initiatives lies not just a great logo or perfectly phrased tagline, but also a strong leader and team of people who feel engaged in the process, motivated to give thoughtful feedback, and focused on the goals of the work—not just the work’s deliverables.

    In the book Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't, Jim Collins offers a powerfully simple metaphor for explaining what makes a good organization become a great one, which naturally applies to the work of nonprofit rebranding.

    You are a bus driver. The bus, your company, is at a standstill, and it’s your job to get it going. You have to decide where you’re going, how you’re going to get there, and who’s going with you.

    Most people assume that great bus drivers (read: business leaders) immediately start the journey by announcing to the people on the bus where they’re going—by setting a new direction or by articulating a fresh corporate vision.

    In fact, leaders of companies that go from good to great start not with “where” but with “who.” They start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats. And they stick with that discipline—first the people, then the direction—no matter how dire the circumstances.

    Nonprofits embarking on big organizational shifts such as rebranding can also benefit from some of Collins’ thinking, shifting attention away from the “what” to the “who.” Inspired by his bus metaphor, we’ve assembled a few leadership lessons for nonprofits thinking about undergoing a significant rebrand. Safe travels.

    1. Invite the right passengers onboard the bus. Nonprofit rebranding is not a one-person job or a task managed exclusively by a consultant. Rebranding successfully requires assembling the right team for the journey as much as making decisions like what color your new logo should be. Strong leadership entails a well-thought-out plan for engagement and feedback from different areas of the organization—from staff inside and outside the communications team, to senior leadership, to the board, to outside experts and consultants. The earlier you know who needs to be on the bus, the better. 
    2. Get the right butts in the right seats. Effective nonprofit leaders don’t just invite the right people on the bus, they think about getting the right people in the right seats. For nonprofit rebranding, that means mapping out the responsibilities and expectations of those involved in the process based on their connection to the organization and areas of expertise, and clearly communicating how the ultimate decisions will be made. A RACI chart is a helpful tool to employ when rebranding: it clarifies roles and responsibilities, making sure that nothing falls through the cracks. RACI charts also prevent confusion by assigning clear ownership for tasks and decisions. We’ve seen that strong nonprofit leaders don't shoulder the full responsibility for decision making or obscure how the decision will ultimately be made or who will make it. 
    3. Agree upon the destination. Now that you have the right people in the right seats, work on defining and communicating the destination. Jim Collins explains that this is where many leaders fall short—they start first with the “what” and then shift to the “who.” In the case of the nonprofit rebrand, that means getting aligned about what the rebrand is ultimately in service of (fundraising? greater awareness? advocacy?), identifying who the right audiences are to achieve that goal, and clarifying the strategies to reach them. As a leader, it’s your job to ensure that everyone understands and is bought into what the destination is and how you’ll get there. If everyone on the bus has a different destination in mind, then it’s going to be a tough journey. Some of the most challenging rebrand processes we’ve been a part of happen when key people involved lose sight of why they’re doing this. It’s the leader’s job to keep that vision alive. 
    4. Expect some potholes. Change is hard, and rebranding is no exception. The more you can embrace the idea that challenges will be part of the process—and better yet, see them coming before anyone else does—the better shape you’ll be in. People will disagree, and the work might not be “it” the first time around. Rebranding is a process, and as a leader it’s your job to expect the challenges, understand them, and navigate through them. 
    5. Keep your passengers in the know. Communicating with everyone involved throughout the rebrand process is essential, especially because rebrands don’t happen overnight. Let folks know what the process will include, what’s happening next, and the status of everything. Don’t leave your passengers unengaged or lost. 
    6. Triage passenger feedback and politics. When it’s time to start making decisions and evaluating the work, it’s your job to listen to new ideas without judgment, take feedback seriously, and process what you’ve heard through the lens of the desired goals. Consider everything, but be comfortable knowing that not everyone’s opinions have to be included or have to be reflected in the final product. It’s up to you, as the leader, to decide and hold firm on what will (and what won’t) happen.
    7. Arrive safely at the destination. Ultimately, it’s your job as the driver on this journey to keep your hands on the wheel and your eyes on the road, and follow the smartest route possible. In a rebrand, you’ll have to ensure decisions are made, commit to those decisions, and make sure your team understands and supports those decisions. Some detours are okay, but a successful journey must come to an end.

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • NEW! Campaign Touts Benefits Of Local Pet Adoptions
    Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    New Jersey's Liberty Humane Society is launching its largest campaign thanks to The S3 Agency's pro bono program that awards free creative services to selected clients.

    The Adopt A City Petcampaign combines  “shop local” with “adopt local” to convey the benefits of adopting a city pet. Images of pets are presented alongside headlines such as “Wedouble-dog dare you” and “Don’t be a scaredy-cat" to serve as a call-to-action. The goal is to get people to understand the impact of adopting local — and adopting throughLiberty Humane Society, who takes in city pets that need loving homes just as much as the fluffballs in the pet store, says The S3 Agency.

    The challenge is that there is a lot of competitionwhen it comes to the animal adoption market; how do you motivate potential pet owners to see the needs that are most beneficial to their community?.

    The ads run exclusively on out-of-homemedia along various NJ TRANSIT bus, rail, and light rail lines to reach commuters and residents throughout the summer. The message is supported across social media via the #AdoptACityPet hashtag.

     

     

    Source: Media Post: Social Media & Marketing Daily
  • What Does Apple's No-Tracking Feature Mean For Ad Tech?
    Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Continuing its efforts to promote itself as privacy-friendly, Apple made an announcement this week that its Safari browser will block autoplay video ads and incorporate a no-tracking feature thatwill hide consumers' Web browsing from ad targeting. These moves are bound to affect an already beleaguered ad-tech sector.

    Source: Media Post: MediaDailyNews
  • What Does Apple's No-Tracking Feature Mean For Ad Tech?
    Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Continuing its efforts to promote itself as privacy-friendly, Apple made an announcement this week that its Safari browser will block autoplay video ads and incorporate a no-tracking feature thatwill hide consumers' Web browsing from ad targeting. These moves are bound to affect an already beleaguered ad-tech sector.

    Source: Media Post: Search Marketing Daily
  • The Bus Crash: Lessons Learned From The Accidental Oscars
    Friday Mar 3, 2017

    Jimmy Kimmel was on cruise control, generally killin' it at the Oscars. All was surprisingly unpolitical and stellar, until the Dolby Theater tour bus crashed.

    Source: Media Post: Mad Blog
  • YouTube shows off VR-centric video analytics
    By Lucas Matney - Friday Jun 16, 2017

     Google may have a few VR projects lined up across hardware, but for now one of its biggest selling points for mobile VR is YouTube. Today, YouTube announced that it’s bringing heat map analytics to the service so that 360-degree video producers can see where their viewers are paying attention at any given time. 360-degree video may not be as hyped as it once was, but YouTube has the… Read More

    Source: TechCrunch