501 hedeman holdings corp.

914 bedford avenue
brooklyn, new york 11205

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 24, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4641274

County
KINGS

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - 501 HEDEMAN HOLDINGS CORP.









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • Neighborhood Joint: Staubitz Market in Brooklyn: 100 Years of Sawdust, Steaks and Chops
    By ANDREW COTTO - Wednesday Jun 14, 2017

    A display contains frozen items, and the shelves are stocked with jars and cans. But there’s just one reason to visit this Boerum Hill business: meat.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Cyclist Killed by Bus in New York’s First Citi Bike Fatality
    By MATTHEW HAAG and HANNAH ALANI - Tuesday Jun 13, 2017

    Dan Hanegby of Brooklyn fell under a bus’s tires in Chelsea. He worked for Credit Suisse and was once the top-ranked tennis player in Israel.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Pride 2017: New York’s L.G.B.T.Q. Story Began Well Before Stonewall
    By LIAM STACK - Monday Jun 19, 2017

    The gay bar’s 1969 patron-police battle, hailed as a starting point, actually followed many events in the city, now mapped in a sites project.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Booz Allen Hamilton Says It Is Under Federal Investigation
    By MATTHEW HAAG - Friday Jun 16, 2017

    The Virginia-based consultant said the Justice Department is reviewing its billing procedures in a civil and criminal investigation.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Pro-Trump Nonprofit 501(c)(4) Runs Ad Attacking Comey ahead of Testimony
    By Ruth McCambridge - Wednesday Jun 7, 2017

    Political attack ads against anyone, on any subject, by nonprofit advocacy groups are quickly and easily done, as we see in this week’s news.

    The post Pro-Trump Nonprofit 501(c)(4) Runs Ad Attacking Comey ahead of Testimony appeared first on Non Profit News For Nonprofit Organizations | Nonprofit Quarterly.

    Source: Nonprofit Quarterly
  • Finding your nonprofit’s voice in the Trump era
    Tuesday Feb 7, 2017

    The last couple of weeks have been an emotionally draining and stressful time for so many of us who work in the nonprofit sector and are devoted to social justice and democratic values. Despite several alarming executive orders and appointees, it has been assuring to witness powerful and swift communications from nonprofit leaders of all types whose missions and values feel like they’re under attack (see Farra’s round-up of nonprofit leaders responding to the election). The fact is that the voices and actions of nonprofits are needed now more than ever, and it’s critical that organizations across all issues and areas seriously consider what role they can play in navigating through these uncertain political times.

    Some nonprofits whose missions are under threat but also have powerful advocacy programs and robust communications teams appear well equipped to respond to these crises and take the lead in mobilizing supporters to take action. Within moments of a new piece of breaking news from the White House, it seems like organizations like the ACLU and Planned Parenthood Federation of America have updated their websites with relevant content, urging their followers to take specific actions and donate.  

    Most nonprofits aren’t in the same position of power and capacity as the ACLU or Planned Parenthood to respond. Many nonprofits have missions that will be impacted more tangentially (or perhaps not at all) by national policies and politics. It can be hard to know how and what to communicate—what the next tweet should be, what statement to issue, how urgent to sound, what action to request. And it can be tempting—especially in such stressful and emotional times—to dial up all your communications, responding to every news announcement or headline. But such a reactive approach can spiral out of control fast, lead you to inflate your connection to a particular issue, and is just unsustainable for most communications teams running with limited staff and resources.

    Staying silent on current events that impact your communities may not be an option either. You might be perceived as out of touch, miss an opportunity to make a powerful statement about what you stand for, or leverage this moment for fundraising. What's the right communications approach for your nonprofit?

    Here are a few ideas to help your nonprofit make decisions now:

      • Brush up on your nonprofit’s guidelines for political activity: You probably already know if your nonprofit is a 501(c)(3) or a 501(c)(4), but now is a great time to remind yourself of the rules and guidelines associated with both, especially some of the limitations of a 501(c)(3) when it comes to politics. They’re a little murky, so read carefully, and consult with knowledgeable staff or lawyers to confirm. Here’s a resource to get the basics.
      • Get aligned on your stance: Figuring out how your organization responds to the political fire should be a shared decision. Hold a meeting among primary communicators, senior staff, and key board members to discuss your organization’s approach as well as roles and responsibilities.
      • Review your key organizational and communications goals: Keep your organization’s primary goals in mind (fundraising? systems change? education? recruitment?), determine how communications support them,and who you need to engage most to reach those goals. Have these priorities shifted as a result of this election? Was advocacy more of a secondary goal that’s now more primary? How do the results of this election influence your ability to reach these goals?
      • Consider your audience's point of view: Who are your audiences and what are their political views? Is your list made up of bleeding heart liberals? A mix of people from across the ideological spectrum? Craft your messages and actions with your audience's values and perspectives in mind.
      • Know how you can uniquely contribute: What can your nonprofit contribute to the conversation that’s different from other groups (e.g. putting a spotlight on real voices, issue expertise)? Prioritize issues that are most important for you to weigh in on. Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
      • Keep your brand in mind: It might be tempting to shift your organization’s tone and style now. But if you’re a social services organization and suddenly sound like a radical advocacy organization, it could be alarming and confusing to your audiences. Keep your tone in check and make sure you’re staying true to what your organization is all about. If your style is shifting, consider updating your brand’s voice alongside it. (We’ve got a brand check-up process that can help.

    How is your nonprofit navigating communications in the Trump era? We’d love to hear from you.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • The High Value of Your Nonprofit’s Values
    Wednesday Jan 25, 2017

    I was delighted to participate as a steering committee in the Brooklyn Community Foundation’s inaugural Spark Prize, an exciting new grantmaking initiative. I was truly impressed with how the Foundation integrated its values into every aspect of this project and leveraged them as a strategic decision-making tool in the grant review process, so I asked their fabulous DIrector of Communications, Liane Stegmaier, to write about it.  - Sarah Durham

    This month, Brooklyn Community Foundation marks the third anniversary of Brooklyn Insights—an extensive Brooklyn-wide community engagement project launched shortly after our President Cecilia Clarke joined the Foundation, which ultimately produced a bold grantmaking strategy that has since garnered national recognition.

    And coincidentally, on this anniversary we are announcing the recipients of our new Spark Prize—one of the Foundation’s highest-profile grantmaking efforts to date, awarding 5 outstanding Brooklyn nonprofits with no-strings-attached grants of $100,000 each in recognition of their service to Brooklyn, commitment to equity and justice, strong organizational values, and dynamic vision for the future.

    While we’re often asked about the major themes surfaced through our 1,000-plus Brooklyn Insights’ community conversations, the core grantmaking strategies we’ve since focused on, or our new institution-wide Racial Justice Lens—in this blog, we’re going to focus on the set of values that emerged during Brooklyn Insights that not only helped the Foundation determine our new direction, but continue to guide us and inform new initiatives like the Spark Prize.

    Of course, we knew three years ago that creating a community-led strategy might also lead us to change our mission statement and vision. But what we didn’t fully appreciate at the time was that while mission and vision are critical for moving us forward, strong institutional values are necessary to define who we are as an institution and how we hold ourselves accountable to these pursuits each and every day.

    Over the six months of listening to Brooklynites tell us about the challenges they faced in their communities, the opportunities they saw for change, and the roles we as their Community Foundation could play, we also heard loud and clear a call for us to be a different kind of institution: one that wears its values on its sleeve, keeps the doors open, and always positions community voices at the fore of its work.

    This call led us to articulate five new values for Brooklyn Community Foundation:

    • Courage. We believe in fearlessly identifying barriers to change and we fight for solutions that help overcome injustice.

    • Creativity. We believe that the power of imagination is greater than the challenges we face. We celebrate what works. We pursue the new. We learn as much from failure as we do from success.

    • Honesty. We are committed to being open and trustworthy in all we do and seek partners who share our values.

    • Collaboration. We believe in creating solutions together, harnessing the diversity of Brooklyn, and partnering with the community to spark change and produce results.

    • Respect. We believe in every resident’s dignity and basic human rights, and honor diversity of race, gender and background.

    We’ve come to refer to these values at every test in our decision-making, we talk about them in our Board meetings, staff meetings, and annual staff reviews, and they’ve informed our ongoing racial justice and equity trainings.

    And with the new Spark Prize, we are spotlighting the importance of strong values, and celebrating 5 Brooklyn nonprofits for their exemplary values-driven work. The first-ever recipients of the Spark Prize are Audre Lorde Project, Common Justice, Make the Road New York, MoCADA, and Neighbors Together.

    A committee of approximately 30 Brooklyn civic, business and philanthropic leaders (including Big Duck’s own Sarah Durham!) selected the 5 organizations from an applicant pool of over 150. They were chosen on the basis of a 1,000 word essay, followed by in person interviews where each spoke to the role their values play in their organization and how they align with the Foundation’s values.

    In their application, Audre Lorde Project stated that their values are rooted in transparency, wellness, transformation, cultural work and coalition building. “Collaboration with other social justice organizations is central to ALP’s intersectional, movement-building work.”

    Make the Road wrote that their values are why their 19,000+ members shape all of their campaigns: “Our youth challenge oppression by naming the disparate treatment of black and brown, LGBTQ and immigrant young people …. Their passionate advocacy has resulted in huge movement victories.”

    MoCADA isa museum founded on principles of justice, equity, and inclusion….courage, creativity and collaboration are the key elements of our mission, vision and values.”

    Neighbors Together’s work isgrounded in our belief in the dignity and potential of each person to be a vital part of creating a more just society” and its members have the courage “to fight for real and lasting solutions to overcome injustice.”

    And last but not least, Common Justice highlighted each of their values in their application—demonstrating a deep connection between their values and the unique nature of their healing work between victims and perpetrators of violence:

    • Accountability. We are responsible for our actions, our words, our power, and our impacts. We know that accountability affirms the dignity and humanity both of those responsible and of those harmed, and we hold ourselves to the same high standards to which we hold others. 

    • Transparency. We are transparent about our actions, our intentions, our options, and our decisions. We communicate with clarity and consistency with those impacted by what we do. 

    • Transformation. We believe in the potential of all human beings to transform, heal, grow, change, and be resilient. We believe we all deserve individuals, communities, and institutions that support us in being our best selves. 

    • Respect. We believe in the inherent worth, importance, rights, culture, and strengths of all people, and work to reflect and honor that in the way we behave toward others. 

    • Purpose. We uphold the responsibilities and boundaries of our work because we are ambitious, hopeful, and outcomes-driven. 

    These 5 values send a powerful message, and are a primary reason Common Justice is receiving the Spark Prize in our inaugural year.

    As nonprofit communicators, we are all very familiar with the adage “Show, Don’t Tell.”

    Mission tells us what you do; values show who you are.

     

    Source: BigDuck smart communications for nonprofits
  • No ‘Inner City’ in Brownsville, Brooklyn, Just Overlooked Strengths
    By GINIA BELLAFANTE - Thursday Mar 30, 2017

    The Brooklyn neighborhood synonymous with poverty is working to remake itself without giving in to the forces of gentrification.

    Source: New York Times