322 old town road family properties inc

po box 1103
setauket, new york 11733

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
SEPTEMBER 16, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4636829

County
SUFFOLK

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC BUSINESS CORPORATION

Name History
2014 - 322 OLD TOWN ROAD FAMILY PROPERTIES INC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • 19th-Century Diary Suggests Slaves Are Buried in Brooklyn Lot
    By MICHAEL WILSON - Friday Aug 4, 2017

    A Gowanus farmer’s writings from 1828 to 1830 describe burying them on property that includes the proposed site of a prekindergarten.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Hiking and biking County Mayo, Ireland’s Wild West
    By Larry Habegger - Thursday Jun 22, 2017

    Just 15 minutes earlier, I’d been abandoned by my wife and two teenage daughters, who refused to join me on our afternoon bike ride when the heavy sky began spitting rain. County Mayo is the kind of place that visitors imagine when they think of rural Ireland: whitewashed stone houses in impossibly green fields dotted with sheep; rolling hills that tumble into the sea or break off in sheer cliffs; narrow winding roads that lead to villages with pubs and fish markets; residents with an admirable patience who are happy to take a moment to chat; small towns with cozy cafes and restaurants serving local fare. We strolled around Westport, a thriving town with shops that ably serve both the community and visitors, and enjoyed the cafes and tearooms. [...] mostly because of dumb luck, we climbed Ireland’s holy mountain Croagh Patrick on the annual pilgrimage day when tens of thousands of people make the ascent, some of them barefoot as a way to do penance. [...] you don’t have to be a pilgrim to join the conga line slithering up the holy mountain. A statue of St. Patrick marks the starting point to the climb, but to get there we had to run the gantlet of souvenir stands selling rosaries, candles, portraits of the pope, images of Catholic saints, prayer books and various trinkets. A welcoming sign read, PREPARE TO MEET THY GOD. Dozens of people milled about apparently contemplating just that while gazing up at the rocky trail sprinkled with confetti-colored specks that turned out to be distant hikers. Strangers called out words of encouragement as stones clattered under our boots and nylon rustled against nylon. Within minutes, the view opened up over the pastures and hills; islands dotted the silver sea below. Teams of paramedics relaxed around first-aid tents, ready for the inevitable injuries. Some say the annual rite began in the Stone Age 5,000 years ago when people climbed to mark harvest season; others say it started 1,500 years ago. Up and up we went, slower than some, faster than others, and stopped after an hour for a snack on a ridge, preparing for the next hour, which would be a steep climb up unstable scree to the summit. Clouds drifted in and partially obscured the view, but we could see the trail thick with people climbing, descending, passing each other along the way. On the steep climb, the rocks shifted with every step, and it would be easy to twist an ankle, especially in the crowd. Step by step we made our way up with our many fellow climbers, and before we knew it we were at the top, where groups posed for photos and in the chapel a priest was saying Mass at a window above the throng. A cloud had settled on us, and we waited in the chill, snacking again, congratulating ourselves and others, hoping to get the full summit view. [...] 15 minutes later, the sun broke out and I was skimming along the paved path through the pastures with the wild sky above and shimmering Clew Bay below. Later, when I decided I didn’t need to wear my rain pants anymore, I stopped to take them off and shoot a few photos. The Greenway opened in April 2010 through the efforts of the Mayo County Council and the agreement of the landowners whose property the Greenway crosses. Even though the right of way followed the defunct rail line of Midlands Great Western Railway, the county needed their permission. Since it opened, statistics show a peak of about 1,000 people per day using the path, with an overall average of about 250 people per day in the June-August high season. The Greenway has produced some 130 seasonal and 60 off-season jobs, 7 bike rental companies, and several cafes and restaurants in Newport, Westport and Mulranny. The county has plans to restore a railroad station at the Mulranny Park Hotel, create an interpretive center, improve the pathway surface in some places, and restore old railway cottages as shelters with toilets and refreshments. Just before Newport, it skirted then crossed an inlet from the sea over the arched stone Burrishoole Bridge, and I coasted downhill in glorious sunshine into town for coffee at the Blue Bicycle Tea Rooms. If the rain came, I’d be just another fool let loose on the wind, but I’d dry out in no time by the turf fire in our cottage, a cup of tea in hand and the green pastures and glistening sea outside the window. In the town center, Willow Cafe Tea Room serves simple meals of soups, salads, sandwiches, quiches and lots of baked goods along with excellent coffee and teas. Kelly’s Kitchen serves full Irish breakfast and lunches with locally sourced meats from the adjacent butcher (all in the family), who’s been serving the community for decades.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Travel
  • Charges in road-rage death don't temper family's grief
    Monday Jul 3, 2017

    (AP) — The family of a Pennsylvania woman who was fatally shot during a road-rage confrontation says they're relieved a suspect turned himself in, but it won't temper their grief over the recent high school graduate's death.After David Desper was taken into custody by Chester County authorities on Sunday for the murder of 18-year-old Bianca Roberson, the slain woman's brother told WPVI-TV he can't shake the image of her jostling with the suspect as the two tried to merge into a single lane.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Actor James Cromwell to report to jail for plant protest
    Wednesday Jul 12, 2017

    WAWAYANDA, N.Y. (AP) — Oscar-nominated actor James Cromwell is heading to jail in New York for blocking traffic to protest a power plant.A town judge sentenced the 77-year-old Cromwell and two fellow protesters to a week in the Orange County Jail for civil disobedience at the construction site of a 650-megawatt natural gas-fired power plant in December 2015.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Filipino church feeds expansion by buying ghost town in US
    By MICHAEL MELIA, Associated Press - Sunday Jul 16, 2017

    Filipino church feeds expansion by buying ghost town in USThere were requirements to preserve its historical character and problems with the septic system, not to mention rumors that it was haunted.The relief in East Haddam has been mixed with curiosity over what exactly the church has planned for the community known as Johnsonville, which was home to twine mills in the 19th century before becoming a tourist attraction in the 1960s.No plans for the Connecticut property have been finalized, Crisostomo said, but a chapel will probably be restored as a new house of worship, and the church expects to keep the four residential properties and possibly add some more.An industrialist who acquired it in the 1960s bought old buildings including a schoolhouse and stable and moved them here with aspirations of recreating a 19th century village but it never became a major tourist attraction.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Top News Stories
  • Detwiler Fire leaves family only memories
    By Kurtis Alexander - Saturday Jul 22, 2017

    MARIPOSA — Beneath the sweltering foothill sun, Miki and Jai Crawford stood in the front yard of their daughter’s home eyeing an odd but deliberately placed pile of stuff: two trash bags filled with clothes, several bins of family photos and a few pieces of small furniture, including an old sewing machine and a cuckoo clock.The items, strewn across a tarp next to an oak tree Friday, were all that the couple managed to rush out of their three-bedroom house before it burned in last week’s explosive wildfire west of Yosemite National Park.While what survived was little more than memories of raising three children in their home of 22 years, the Crawfords spent the recent morning taking stock of what they had — and, more importantly, what they would need going forward.Residents up and down the state will see skies continue to clog with suffocating summer smoke, and thousands in small towns and rural hills have already begun the tiresome drill of evacuating their homes until danger passes.While the Crawfords have not been back to their property since the fire hit — the area has remained under mandatory evacuation — their son has.Just like the homes on either side of them in the community of Mount Bullion, a few miles northwest of Mariposa, the Crawfords’ house was reduced to a pile of chalky debris.Jai works maintenance at the dump in Mariposa and Miki, 56, makes crafts that she sells at local fairs.Amid the somber talk of their future, Miki Crawford felt a pang of comfort when she realized the wisdom — and luck — of her impromptu decision earlier in the week to pack out her sewing machine.[...] she can continue to work, she said, and though that probably won’t produce the kind of windfall they need to get their lives back in order, it will at least help — and take her mind off the fire.The couple left within minutes, gathering up their six dogs and the few things they’d thrown together the day before, all the while expecting that they’d be back in their house soon.Sixty homes have burned in the Detwiler Fire since it began last Sunday, fire officials say.With the fire, the total area turned to ash in California since Jan. 1 has grown to nearly 200,000 acres, about twice what usually burns by this time of year, according to state and federal figures.The activity, officials say, is because of a wet winter that left behind an unusually thick proliferation of combustible grass and brush.In historical downtown Mariposa, which remained shutdown to all but firefighters until Friday afternoon, residents and merchants were already doing what they could to help fire victims.Bob Borchard, owner of Bett’s Gold Coin tavern — which at 167 years old is said to be the oldest occupied building in the Mother Lode — was preparing to open the bar after a four-day closure and serve food and drinks to locals.While Borchard was turning on the tavern lights, the president of the town’s Chamber of Commerce stopped by to talk about fundraising.Several aid groups, including the American Red Cross, were inviting donations while victims like the Crawfords were accepting contributions through individual GoFundMe accounts.“On Sunday, we were swimming in our pool with our four grandchildren,” Miki said, as she clutched one of the surviving photos that showed her home with colorful jasmine growing out front.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Bay Area News
322 old town road family properties inc setauket ny