315 west 103 enterprises LLC

11 grace avenue
ste. 108
great neck, new york 11021

NYS Entity Status
ACTIVE

NYS Filing Date
AUGUST 18, 2014

NYS DOS ID#
4623227

County
NASSAU

Jurisdiction
NEW YORK

Registered Agent
NONE

NYS Entity Type
DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

Name History
2014 - 315 WEST 103 ENTERPRISES LLC









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  • AROUND THE WEB

  • The Hunt: A Private Roof Deck on the Upper West Side
    By JOYCE COHEN - Thursday Jun 8, 2017

    A couple wanted outdoor space, and found it, but at the top of a walk-up building.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Stonewall Inn Project to Preserve Stories Behind a Gay Rights Monument
    By SARAH MASLIN NIR - Saturday Jun 17, 2017

    A $1 million grant will go toward conserving the oral histories of those who lived through the 1969 riots.

    Source: NYT > Home Page
  • Marin Cilic breaks down in tears during Wimbledon final
    Sunday Jul 16, 2017

    Croatian tennis player Marin Cilic was overwhelmed with emotion during the second set in Sunday's final match in Wimbledon against Sweden's Roger Federer, sparking a series of reactions on social media.

    Source: Fox News Sports
  • Ex-Stars coach Lindy Ruff hired as NY Rangers assistant
    Monday Jul 10, 2017

    New York Rangers have hired longtime NHL head coach Lindy Ruff

    Source: Fox News Sports
  • The Oscars' 9 best picture nominees and how we rated them
    By Chronicle Staff Report - Thursday Feb 23, 2017

    The Oscar’s 9 best picture nominees Prep for your Oscars party this weekend with a recap of this year’s nine best picture nominees, each film reviewed by The Chronicle’s Datebook team. On the big day, also keep up-to-date with us at www.sfchronicle.com/entertainment. The 89th annual Academy Awards, hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, is broadcast live on ABC at 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. Arrival Director Denis Villeneuve casts aside almost every “Independence Day,” “E.T.” and “Contact” cliché, and makes a science fiction epic that breaks free of genre shoeboxing. Amy Adams is a linguistics professor who, in collaboration with a physicist and mathematician played by Modesto-bred Jeremy Renner, races against the clock to make conversation with aliens. Better to leave the rest to surprise. The film is tightly calibrated, but leaves things open to interpretation, for discussion on the ride home from the theater and beyond. PG-13. 116 minutes. To read the full review, click here. Brilliantly written (by playwright August Wilson and directed by Denzel Washington), this is one for the ages, alongside “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “A Streetcar Named Desire” as one of the handful of great movies made from great plays. The ensemble work is flawless, highlighted by Washington and Viola Davis as a working class couple in the Pittsburgh of the 1950s. PG-13. 138 minutes. To read the full review, click here. Andrew Garfield is terrific in the lead role. R. 131 minutes To read the full review, click here. Hell or High Water An outstanding modern Western, about two bank-robbing brothers (Chris Pine, Ben Foster) pursued by a pair of Rangers (Jeff Bridges, Gil Birmingham) in dusty and economically depressed West Texas. The film touches on many weighty themes — the law, institutional responsibility, loyalty to family, individualism — but has a surprising amount of humor. R. 103 minutes To read the full review, click here. A by-the-books historical piece, about black women mathematicians working in NASA’s early days, the film is enlivened by the three principal actresses, Taraji P. Henson, Janelle Monae and Octavia Spencer, and by Kevin Costner, who is the perfect vision of the early 1960s man. PG. 127 minutes. To read the full review, click here. The result is one of the best films of the year, with Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling as a pair of strivers who meet in Los Angeles and try to help each other. PG-13. 128 minutes. To read the full review, click here. Knowing the ending in advance is usually considered detrimental to effective filmmaking, but a smart director and screenwriter can use foreknowledge to their advantage, if they work it right. For much of the way, director Garth Davis and screenwriter Luke Davies work it right in “Lion,” the fact-based story of a young man (Dev Patel) who goes in search of his lost childhood. PG-13 118 minutes. To read the full review, click here. Manchester by the Sea Casey Affleck is magnificent in this portrait of a working class guy in Massachusetts, stumbling through life in the wake of personal tragedy. R. 137 minutes. To read the full review, click here. Stars Bay Area’s own Mahershala Ali. R. 110 minutes. To read the full review, click here.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Movie Reviews
  • ‘Game of Thrones': Clues About the Ironborn and House Greyjoy From Real Viking History (Guest Blog)
    By Carolyne Larrington, provided by
    - Friday Jul 7, 2017

    Ironborn military power is underpinned by their slender, beautifully designed warships which allow them to strike at will along the Westerosi coastline, and so it’s tempting to compare them with the Vikings, the medieval Scandinavian raiders who brought terror to Europe for three centuries.When he discovers that Theon’s splendid neck chain was bought rather than stolen, Balon tears it from his son’s neck, snarling, “That bauble around your neck, did you pay the iron-price for it, or the gold?” Balon clearly is not the kind of medieval Scandinavian king who would be celebrated by his court poets (skalds) for distributing treasure; no one would praise him as a “breaker of rings” or a “thrower of gold” or even a “hater … of the flame-red dragon square,” to cite just a few of Old Norse poetry’s terms for the generous king.The military successes of the Viking-age Scandinavians — settling northern England, founding Dublin and establishing the duchy of Normandy — were possible because their ships could travel far up the great rivers of Europe.The Great Army which swept across northern England in 865 A.D. took horses from those they defeated and thus were mobile enough to achieve military success inland, away from the rivers and coastlines where they easily could regroup on their ships.The Ironborn’s faith is very different from any version of Viking religion that we know of, but their belief in life after death closely resembles a watery version of Valhalla, the god Odin’s great hall, where the valkyries bring heroes who die in battle.When Yara and Theon sailed to Meereen to put their 50 ships at the disposal of Daenerys Targaryen for her long-anticipated invasion of Westeros, Daenerys agreed to support Yara’s claim to the Salt Chair, the Ironborn throne.The Vikings may have left their homelands because population pressure made it hard for them to sustain a living by agriculture on the thin soils and limited flatlands of the Norwegian or Icelandic fjords.For most of the Viking Age, Vikings were already successful traders, dealing in foodstuffs, timber, furs, falcons and slaves all across the North Atlantic, settling into lives as merchants and craftsmen in thriving towns such as Bergen and Trondheim.

    Source: SFGATE.com: Daily Dish
315 west 103 enterprises llc great neck ny